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Antecedents and outcomes of intervention program participation and task priority change among school psychology counselors: a latent variable growth framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153677
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2008 Feb;46(1):23-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Thormod Idsoe
Knut A Hagtvet
Edvin Bru
Unni Vere Midthassel
Stein Knardahl
Author Affiliation
Center for Behavioral Research, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway. thormod.idsoe@uis.no
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2008 Feb;46(1):23-52
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Counseling - education
Culture
Curriculum
Employee Performance Appraisal
Female
Humans
Inservice training
Internal-External Control
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Psychology, Educational - education
Self Efficacy
Abstract
A three-year national intervention program introduced into the School Psychology Service (SPS) in Norway with the aim of increasing systemic level work among SP counselors was investigated. Latent variable growth models based on longitudinal data from 195 SP counselors gave no significant mean level change in systemic level work. This concurred with GLM analyses based on data from a sample of 20 schools. However, retrospective self-reported significant positive mean level change for systemic level work was detected among the SP counselors. Intervention program participation was associated with individual change in systemic level work. Self-efficacy beliefs about systemic level work, and school-related etiology beliefs predicted individual change to a certain degree. Comparison of two rival models gave no support for a hypothesized interaction among intervention program participation and beliefs in their effects on systemic level work. Open-ended questions indicated that individual level workload and the perceived expectations from the schools may have concern for a successful effect of the intervention program in addition to the hypothesized ones. Individual change in systemic level work was positively associated with individual change in job satisfaction.
PubMed ID
19083350 View in PubMed
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The approach of medical students towards studies of the humanities and social sciences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161568
Source
Medicina (Kaunas). 2007;43(7):580-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Irayda Jakusovaite
Aurelija Blazeviciene
Author Affiliation
Department of Philosophy and Social Sciences, Kaunas University of Medicine, A. Mickeviciaus 9, Kaunas, Lithuania.
Source
Medicina (Kaunas). 2007;43(7):580-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Chi-Square Distribution
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Medical
Ethics
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humanities - education
Humans
Lithuania
Male
Philosophy
Poland
Psychology - education
Questionnaires
Russia
Social Sciences - education
Sociology - education
Students, Medical
Abstract
To analyze the attitudes of the medical students from Kaunas University of Medicine, Krakow Jagiellonian University, and St. Petersburg State University towards the studies of the humanities and social sciences.
The survey was carried out in three universities (Kaunas University of Medicine, Krakow Jagiellonian University, and St. Petersburg State University) during 2004-2005. The questionnaire for the investigation was developed based on R. D. Stenberg's works on the ways of knowledge-, practice-, and personality-oriented thinking.
After the analysis of students' attitudes towards the importance of the disciplines of ethics, philosophy, sociology, and psychology at the universities of Kaunas, Krakow, and St. Petersburg, important differences have been found among them. Students gave the highest priority to ethics in their profession. Answering the question, "Are philosophical studies important in medical studies," statistically significant differences appeared among Krakow, Kaunas, and St. Petersburg universities. Students of all the universities agreed that sociology and psychology studies were important for their future profession.
Having estimated the opinions of medical students' attitudes towards the importance of the humanities and social sciences, we may state that the students of Krakow and St. Petersburg universities more often agreed that ethics and philosophy were important for their studies. The importance of psychology science was emphasized by the students of all universities, and the students of Kaunas University of Medicine and St. Petersburg State University agreed more often that the discipline of sociology was important for the future studies.
PubMed ID
17768374 View in PubMed
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Collaboration between family physicians and psychologists: what do family physicians know about psychologists' work?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158813
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Feb;54(2):232-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Jean Grenier
Marie-Hélène Chomienne
Isabelle Gaboury
Pierre Ritchie
William Hogg
Author Affiliation
Montfort Hospital, 713 Montreal St, Ottawa ON K1K 0T2. jgrenier@uottawa.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Feb;54(2):232-3
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Gatekeeping
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental Health Services - manpower
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physicians, Family - psychology
Professional Role
Psychology - education - methods
Psychotherapy - manpower
Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore factors affecting collaboration between family physicians and psychologists.
Mailed French-language survey.
Eastern Ontario.
Family physicians practising in the area of the Réseau des services de santé en français de l'Est de l'Ontario.
Physicians' knowledge and understanding of the qualifications of psychologists and the regulations governing their profession; beliefs regarding the effectiveness of psychological treatments; views on the integration of psychologists into primary care; and factors affecting referrals to psychologists.
Of 457 surveys sent, 118 were returned and analyzed (27% of surveys delivered). Most family physicians were well aware that there were evidence-based psychological interventions for mental health and personal difficulties, and some knew that psychological interventions could help with physical conditions. Physicians had some knowledge about the qualifications and training of psychologists. Many physicians reported being uncomfortable providing counseling themselves owing to time constraints, the perception that they were inadequately trained for such work, and personal preferences. The largest barrier to referring patients to psychologists was cost, since services were not covered by public health insurance. Some physicians were deterred from referring by previous experience of not receiving feedback on patients from psychologists. Increased access to clinical psychologists through collaborative care was considered a desirable goal for primary health care.
Family physicians know that there are evidence-based psychological interventions for mental health issues. Psychologists need to communicate better about their credentials and what they can offer, and share their professional opinions and recommendations on referred patients. Physicians would welcome practice-based psychological services and integrated interdisciplinary collaboration as recommended by the Kirby and Romanow commissions, but such collaboration is hampered by the lack of public health insurance coverage.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18272640 View in PubMed
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Course in basic sexology for medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52947
Source
Br J Med Educ. 1975 Jun;9(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1975
Author
J. Beckmann
P. Hertoft
J F Larsen
A M Laursen
G. Wagner
Source
Br J Med Educ. 1975 Jun;9(2):114-24
Date
Jun-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Paraphilias
Physiology - education
Psychology - education
Sex Education
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological
Abstract
The present article describes the pilot course in basic sexology for medical students. The duration of the course was 5 days (35 hours). The themes-sex and gender, sexual physiology, contraception, sexual inadequacy, sexual deviations, and sexual counselling-were approached from many different angles. The teaching procedure comprised lectures, group work, and group discussions, internal television, films, plenary discussions, and debates. The course was evaluated by means of the sex knowledge and attitude test (SKAT) given before and after the course. Furthermore an evaluation was given by the students, by a professional teacher, and by a paramedical evaluator at the end of the course. The results showed significant changes in attitudes and knowledge.
PubMed ID
1170873 View in PubMed
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Development of a urinary incontinence educational program using a competency-based approach and case method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149287
Source
J Nurses Staff Dev. 2009 Jul-Aug;25(4):E5-E10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Caroline Collette
Gina Bravo
Le Mai Tu
Author Affiliation
Sherbrooke University Geriatric Institute, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Caroline.Collette@USherbrooke.ca
Source
J Nurses Staff Dev. 2009 Jul-Aug;25(4):E5-E10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Records
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Program Development - methods
Psychology, Educational
Quebec
Urinary Incontinence - nursing
Abstract
Nurses have limited knowledge about urinary incontinence and find it difficult to care for those who suffer from it, yet there is little training on incontinence designed for nurses. Hence, there is a real need to develop and evaluate an appropriate urinary incontinence educational program. A critical issue is the choice of teaching strategies designed to integrate learning. This article describes the competency-based approach and case method used to develop a urinary incontinence education program.
PubMed ID
19657244 View in PubMed
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[Education in public health sciences at the faculty of medicine at Tampere].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251458
Source
Nord Med. 1976 Jan;91(1):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1976
Author
P. Harjuniemi
Source
Nord Med. 1976 Jan;91(1):13-5
Date
Jan-1976
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical
Finland
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Psychology - education
Public Health - education
Sociology - education
Abstract
A large public health institute - one of the three at Tampere - handles the instruction in subjects related to behaviour and community medicine. The students meet patients already in the first term during the group instruction, take part in educational visits, and work for several different periods with the health and sick-care services. In the third year, 30 hours are devoted to a course on the doctor-patient relationship.
PubMed ID
1246510 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Education of medical students in mental retardation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251141
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1976 Apr 19;138(17):1051-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-1976

Efficacy of screen-capture tutorials in literature search training: a pilot study of a research method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108599
Source
Med Ref Serv Q. 2013;32(3):314-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Catherine Boden
Christine J Neilson
J X Seaton
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Library, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. catherine.boden@usask.ca
Source
Med Ref Serv Q. 2013;32(3):314-27
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum - standards
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychology - education
Saskatchewan
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
This pilot study evaluated a research method for examining the efficacy of screen capture tutorials in teaching database search skills. This is not a results-oriented paper but rather describes the facets and testing of a mixed methods protocol. The lessons learned can be applied to a result-oriented study with a larger sample size and to the development of methods for similar studies. The protocol tried to balance control of variables with observing behavior in the natural setting. A combination of concept maps, an information stage questionnaire, and screen recordings provided rich information about health practitioners' research questions and search strategies.
PubMed ID
23869636 View in PubMed
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Electroconvulsive therapy teaching in Canada: cause for concern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117378
Source
J ECT. 2013 Jun;29(2):109-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Simon Patry
Peter Graf
Nicholas John Delva
Peter Chan
Murray Enns
Ian Gilron
Caroline Gosselin
Mark Jewell
James Stuart Lawson
Barry Martin
Roumen Milev
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. simon.patry@institutsmq.qc.ca
Source
J ECT. 2013 Jun;29(2):109-12
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Humans
Internship and Residency
Occupational Therapy - education
Psychiatry - education
Psychology - education
Questionnaires
Social Work - education
Students, Medical
Students, Nursing
Teaching
Abstract
The objective of this study was to present survey data on the teaching of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in health care centers across Canada.
Of 1273 centers identified, 175 were found to practice ECT. These centers were asked to complete a questionnaire, and 107 (61%) of them answered 5 questions dealing specifically with ECT teaching. These questions were as follows: (1) Does your facility have an ECT teaching program for residents in psychiatry? (2) How is ECT taught to residents in psychiatry? (3) If direct supervision of the administration of ECT is a requirement of the psychiatry training program, is there a minimum number of supervised treatments or minimum duration of training period? (4) Do residents provide unsupervised ECT at your center? (5) Which other groups of learners, if any, are provided with orientation, teaching, or training in ECT?
Sixty percent of respondents had no ECT teaching program for psychiatry residents. Pedagogical methods varied, ranging from direct observation of ECT treatments to directed readings. Few centers required a minimum number of supervised treatments. No resident-administered ECT is performed without direct supervision. Interestingly, various groups of health care professionals were often invited to participate in ECT training.
The situation regarding ECT teaching continues to be a cause for concern given the noted absence of organized, structured, and mandatory programs. No resident administering ECT, however, goes unsupervised, which is in keeping with good practice. Electroconvulsive therapy is taught in many different ways, and teaching is accessible to different groups of health care professionals. However, much remains to be done to standardize ECT teaching to render this therapy available to all those who need it and to overcome the stigma and bias associated with it.
PubMed ID
23303423 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.