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24 records – page 1 of 3.

The battered child syndrome in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43962
Source
Nord Psykiatr Tidsskr. 1971;25(2):112-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971

Changes in infant sleep problems after a family-centered intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58336
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2003 Sep-Oct;29(5):375-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arna Skuladottir
Marga Thome
Author Affiliation
Outpatient Clinic for Sleep Disturbed Infants, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2003 Sep-Oct;29(5):375-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy - methods
Child Development
Circadian Rhythm
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Iceland
Infant
Infant Behavior
Infant Care - methods
Irritable Mood
Male
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - education - psychology
Pediatric Nursing - methods
Psychoanalytic Theory
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Wakefulness
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe a family-centered intervention for sleep disturbed infants and its effect on the infants' sleep pattern. METHODS: The sample consisted of 33 infants (6-23 month of age) hospitalized because of sleep problems in The City Hospital in Reykjavik, Iceland, and 33 mothers and 30 fathers. Infants' sleep patterns were assessed by a 1-week diary and by interviews with parents before hospital admission, 1 week and 2 months after discharge. The intervention was based on correction of day-sleep rhythm, support of self-comforting capabilities of the infant, and education of parents in regard to the infants' characteristics and developmental status. Changes in day naps and infant irritability over daytime also improved significantly. FINDINGS: Night sleep improved significantly 1 week after discharge and even more so 2 months later. CONCLUSIONS: Offering a family-centered intervention improves infants' sleep patterns up to 2 months after discharge.
PubMed ID
14651310 View in PubMed
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The developmental/emergent model of archetype, its implications and its application to shamanism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170924
Source
J Anal Psychol. 2006 Feb;51(1):125-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
John Merchant
Author Affiliation
john@jungiananalyst.net.au
Source
J Anal Psychol. 2006 Feb;51(1):125-44
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Psychoanalytic Theory
Psychoanalytic Therapy - methods
Shamanism
Unconscious (Psychology)
Abstract
This paper addresses the ongoing debate in the JAP to do with archetype theory and supports an emergent/developmental model which sees archetypal imagery as an emergent phenomenon arising out of neural bio-structures laid down in early infant life as a result of developmental experience. This model is supported by the current findings of those developmental biologists who adhere to Developmental Systems Theory. The themes of Developmental Systems Theory are examined and corroborative parallels are drawn with the model. A number of implications follows: the model has substantial explanatory power and leads to a new perspective on innatism; it implies an archetype-environment nexus; it collapses the nature-nurture debate in relation to archetype theory; it collapses the 'sacred heritage' approach to archetypes and it removes the conceptual division between the collective and personal unconscious. This developmental/emergent perspective is then applied to the shaman archetype, using ethnographic records of the Sakha (Yakut) Siberian tribe. The material supports the hypothesis that the shamanic complex is laid down in early infancy by a combination of events which cause emotional ruptures in the mother-infant dyad. Siberian shamanism is then understood to arise out of developmental experience and not from the constellation of an autochthonous archetype.
PubMed ID
16451325 View in PubMed
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Father/son relationship during the preschool years. An integrative review with special reference to recent Swedish findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40002
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Dec;68(6):399-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
P. Nettelbladt
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Dec;68(6):399-407
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Father-Child Relations
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Object Attachment
Oedipus Complex
Personality Development
Psychoanalytic Theory
Sweden
Abstract
This review is an attempt to integrate Anglo-American and Swedish studies on father/son relationships. The puerperal period, infancy and early childhood are surveyed. Swedish studies do not support specific stereotyped bonding in the puerperal period. The review confirms the bidirectional nature of the father/son relationship. Thus, counteridentification, i.e. the father's identification with his son, and identification during the oedipal phase, i.e. the son's identification with his father, seem to be essential components in the father/son relationship. However, studies on parent-infant behaviour indicate that different parental roles exist early in infancy. Also, attachment studies point to the specificity of the father/son relationship before the oedipal phase. It is concluded that the major importance of the father/son relationship during the preschool years is to facilitate the son's masculine identification.
PubMed ID
6666637 View in PubMed
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Frame disturbances in no-fee psychotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243622
Source
Int J Psychoanal Psychother. 1982-1983;9:135-46
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Paris
Source
Int J Psychoanal Psychother. 1982-1983;9:135-46
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Fees and Charges
Humans
Insurance, Psychiatric
Male
Patient Discharge
Patient Dropouts - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychoanalytic Theory
Psychotherapy - economics
Abstract
The frame of psychotherapy shows both universality and social relativity. Since the intrapsychic world is permeable to social reality, the meaning of insurance in psychotherapy depends on context. Experience with Canadian National Health Insurance suggests that when no-fee psychotherapy in normative, it is absorbed in the frame. There are still trouble spots in the Canadian system, particularly the management of missed sessions. Depending on the needs of the patient, charging for missed sessions can disrupt therapy entirely or be constructive for the treatment.
PubMed ID
7152812 View in PubMed
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From treating to preventing psychosis: personal perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264218
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2015 May;203(5):352-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2015 May;203(5):352-5
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disease Progression
Early Diagnosis
Follow-Up Studies
Health education
Humans
Norway
Psychoanalytic Theory
Psychoanalytic Therapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - prevention & control
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Adjustment
United States
Abstract
The psychoanalytic treatment model of neurotic disorders was applied "experimentally," usually without concomitant pharmacotherapy, to psychotic disorders in the mid to late 20th century at a private institution (Chestnut Lodge) in Maryland. A long-term follow-up (by this author) essentially documented such an approach to be ineffective but suggested that initial treatment earlier in the development of disorder might prevent or ameliorate the "dementia" of dementia praecox. The opportunity to actually measure the effect of earlier detection and treatment became apparent to this author on sabbatical leave in Stavanger, Norway. The sectorized Norwegian health care system made it possible to engineer early detection of first psychosis in an "experimental" health care sector and compare their outcome to that of first onset patients from two control "usual detection" health care sectors. Early detection was engineered in the experimental sector with educational campaigns about the signs and symptoms of first psychosis targeting the sector's doctors, educators, and the general public through massive educational campaigns. The result was clear. Early detection and treatment resulted in a significantly better symptomatic, social, and instrumental outcome in the experimental sectors compared with "usual detection" sectors, a difference that lasted up to a 10-year follow-up (and perhaps permanently). These events and findings will be reviewed to assert that intervention timing may be far more important than intervention type in the overall strategy of antipsychotic interventions.
PubMed ID
25900549 View in PubMed
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How to motivate childcare workers to engage preschoolers in physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116801
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Feb;11(2):364-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Camille Gagné
Isabelle Harnois
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Laval University, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Canada.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Feb;11(2):364-74
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child care
Child Day Care Centers - manpower
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Intention
Male
Motivation
Motor Activity
Psychoanalytic Theory
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
Data available indicate that numerous childcare workers are not strongly motivated to engage children aged 3-5 in physical activity. Using the theory of planned behavior as the main theoretical framework, this study has 2 objectives: to identify the determinants of the intention of childcare workers to engage preschoolers in physical activity and to identify the variables that could be used to develop an intervention to motivate childcare workers to support preschoolers' physical activity.
174 childcare workers from 60 childcare centers selected at random in 2 regions of Quebec completed a self-administered questionnaire assessing the constructs of the theory of planned behavior as well as past behavior, descriptive norm and moral norm.
Moral norm, perceived behavioral control and subjective norm explained 85% of the variance in intention to engage the children in physical activity.
To motivate childcare workers, it is necessary that they perceive that directors, children's parents and coworkers approve of their involvement in children's physical activity. In addition, their ability to overcome perceived barriers (lack of time, loaded schedule, inclement weather) should be developed. Access to a large outdoor yard might also help motivate childcare workers.
PubMed ID
23359123 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.