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108 records – page 1 of 11.

Access to and waiting time for psychiatrist services in a Canadian urban area: a study in real time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131782
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Elliot M Goldner
Wayne Jones
Mei Lan Fang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia. egoldner@sfu.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Cognitive Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To obtain improved quality information regarding psychiatrist waiting times by use of a novel methodological approach in which accessibility and wait times are determined by a real-time patient referral procedure.
An adult male patient with depression was referred for psychiatric assessment by a family physician. Consecutive calls were made to all registered psychiatrists (n = 297) in Vancouver. A semistructured call procedure was used to collect information about the psychiatrists' availability for receipt of this and similar referrals, identify factors that affect psychiatrist accessibility, and determine the availability of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT).
Efforts were made to contact 297 psychiatrists and 230 (77%) were reached successfully. Among the 230 psychiatrists contacted, 160 (70%) indicated that they were unable to accept the referral. Although 70 (30%) indicated that they might be able to consider accepting a referral, 64 (91% of those who would consider accepting the referral) indicated that they would need to review detailed, written referral information and could not provide estimates of the length of wait times if the patient was to be accepted. Only 6 (3% of the 230 psychiatrists contacted) offered immediate appointment times and their wait times ranged from 4 to 55 days. When asked whether they could provide CBT, most (56%) psychiatrists in clinical practice answered maybe.
Substantial barriers exist for family physicians attempting to refer patients for psychiatric referral. Consolidated efforts to improve access to psychiatric assessment are needed.
PubMed ID
21878158 View in PubMed
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Actuarial assessment of sex offender recidivism risk: a cross-validation of the RRASOR and the Static-99 in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192052
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2001 Dec;25(6):629-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
G. Sjöstedt
N. Långström
Author Affiliation
Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. gabrielle.sjostedt@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2001 Dec;25(6):629-45
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Follow-Up Studies
Forensic Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Offenses
Sweden
Abstract
We cross-validated two actuarial risk assessment tools, the RRASOR (R. K. Hanson, 1997) and the Static-99 (R. K. Hanson & D. Thornton, 1999), in a retrospective follow-up (mean follow-up time = 3.69 years) of all sex offenders released from Swedish prisons during 1993-1997 (N = 1,400, all men, age > or =18 years). File-based data were collected by a researcher blind to the outcome (registered criminal recidivism), and individual risk factors as well as complete instrument characteristics were explored. Both the RRASOR and the Static-99 showed similar and moderate predictive accuracy for sexual reconvictions whereas the Static-99 exhibited a significantly higher accuracy for the prediction of any violent recidivism as compared to the RRASOR. Although particularly the Static-99 proved moderately robust as an actuarial measure of recidivism risk among sexual offenders in Sweden, both procedures may need further evaluation, for example, with sex offender subpopulations differing ethnically or with respect to offense characteristics. The usefulness of actuarial methods for the assessment of sex offender recidivism risk is discussed in the context of current practice.
PubMed ID
11771638 View in PubMed
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[Acute admissions in pediatric psychiatry]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34196
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Jul 14;159(29):4538-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-1997

The Acute Project in Nordland County, northern Norway. A presentation of acute referrals in 1990, and some of the questions raised from them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35976
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994;53 Suppl 1:50-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T. Skarbø
A. Hartvigsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Nordland Psychiatric Hospital, Bodø, Norway.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1994;53 Suppl 1:50-6
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
This article describes the current Acute Project within Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Nordland County, Norway. One of the aims of the project is to gather information about referrals defined as acute. The numbers of acute referrals for the whole county from 1990 are presented, together with more detailed information from the Salten district. The following variables regarding acute referrals are given attention: gender, age, problem description, diagnosis, and cooperation and consultation with other professional agencies. During clinical work in 1990, the opinions of clients and co-workers were gathered concerning which aspects of working with children and their families in crisis they considered as important. These covered both direct client work and work with larger systems. A summary of these considerations is presented.
PubMed ID
8018229 View in PubMed
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Admissions to a Norwegian emergency psychiatric ward: patient characteristics and referring agents. A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132309
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;66(1):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Ingrid H Johansen
Liv Mellesdal
Hugo A Jørgensen
Steinar Hunskaar
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Uni Health, Bergen, Norway. ingrid.johansen@uni.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;66(1):40-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Emergency medical services
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, general practitioners serve as gatekeepers for specialist psychiatric care. Out-of-hours primary healthcare (i.e. casualty clinics) is responsible for the major part of acute psychiatric referrals. There are concerns regarding regular general practitioners' (rGPs') role in emergency psychiatric care of their enlisted patients. Also, the quality of casualty clinics' care and their gatekeeper function are questioned.
To investigate differences between acute admissions to a psychiatric hospital from casualty clinics, rGPs, specialist psychiatric services and other specialist services regarding characteristics of patients and circumstances of the referrals.
A prospective observational study. In the period of 1 May 2005 to 30 April 2008, anonymous information was recorded for all consecutive admissions (n = 5317) to the psychiatric acute unit (PAU) at a psychiatric hospital serving 400,000 inhabitants. The recorded information was: referring agent, circumstances of the referral, patient characteristics, and assessments by the receiving psychiatric resident and the therapist in charge of treatment at the PAU.
There were only small differences between patients referred to PAU from casualty clinics, rGPs, specialist psychiatric services and other specialist services. The referrals from the different referring agents seemed equally well founded. However, the casualty clinics used more police assistance and coercion, and legal basis for admissions was more frequently converted than for other referring agents.
Casualty clinics seem to function adequately as gatekeepers. The high proportion of casualty clinic referrals with converted legal basis might indicate unnecessary use of coercion.
PubMed ID
21830847 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide in Quebec and prior utilization of medical services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177876
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):357-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lambert Farand
Johanne Renaud
François Chagnon
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Administration, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC. lambert.farand@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):357-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - utilization
Child
Death Certificates
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Psychopathology is the main risk factor for adolescent suicide but several studies have shown that only a small proportion of suicide victims receive mental health care during the months preceding their suicide. The goal of this study is to describe the utilization of medical services by Quebec adolescent suicide victims during the year preceding their suicide.
All suicides of persons aged 19 or less that occurred during a five-year period were retrieved from the Quebec Coroner's database. Corresponding medical services utilization data were retrieved from the Quebec physician payment database (RAMQ) and the Quebec hospitalization database (MED-ECHO). Data were analyzed in terms of types and intensity of medical services (physical or psychiatric), types of providers (general practitioners, psychiatrists, and other medical specialists), and timing of interventions relative to the date of suicide.
78% of all Quebec adolescent suicide victims utilized medical services during the year before their suicide. However, only 12% of all victims received medical attention for psychiatric problems, and only 9.9% met with a psychiatrist during that same period of time. General practitioners and non-psychiatric medical specialists provided medical attention for psychiatric problems to only 5.6% and 0.7% of those future suicide victims with whom they met in outpatient settings, and the intensity of their interventions was low.
These results suggest that the level of recognition and treatment of psychopathology in Quebec adolescents who later commit suicide is low, despite the fact that a large proportion of them meet with physicians during the year preceding their suicide. This suggests that information and training programs pertaining to adolescent suicide and psychopathology should be implemented for GPs and non-psychiatric medical specialists as well.
PubMed ID
15490925 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling among psychiatric outpatients: a 1-year prevalence study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114803
Source
Subst Abus. 2013;34(2):162-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christina Nehlin
Leif Grönbladh
Anders Fredriksson
Lennart Jansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry Unit, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. christina.nehlin.gordh@neuro.uu
Source
Subst Abus. 2013;34(2):162-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gambling - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Prevalence
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies of alcohol habits in general psychiatric populations are scarce. The objective was to investigate alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling in a clinical sample of psychiatric outpatients. A further aim was to study age and gender differences in the rates of these habits.
Data were collected among psychiatric outpatients with mainly mood (47%) and anxiety (35%) disorders. A questionnaire package was distributed, including AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), DUDIT (Drug Use Disorders Identification Test), tobacco items, and gambling items. Two major drinking categories were formed: "Nonhazardous alcohol use" (NH) and "Alcohol use above hazardous levels" (AH).
In total, 2160 patients (65% females) responded to the questionnaire package. The AH rate was high among psychiatric outpatients (28.4%), particularly among young females (46.6%). Young female patients also reported a high prevalence of problematic drug use (13.8%). Problematic drug use, daily smoking, and problematic gambling were frequent. The unhealthy habits were linked to AH.
Alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling are all highly prevalent among psychiatric outpatients. Young females are in particular need of attention. Interventions should be tailored for co-occurring psychiatric disorders and applied within routine psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
23577911 View in PubMed
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Analysis of recurrent gap time data using the weighted risk-set method and the modified within-cluster resampling method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139931
Source
Stat Med. 2011 Feb 20;30(4):301-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2011
Author
Xianghua Luo
Chiung-Yu Huang
Author Affiliation
Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, U.S.A. luox0054@umn.edu
Source
Stat Med. 2011 Feb 20;30(4):301-11
Date
Feb-20-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Community Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Computer Simulation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Recurrence
Sampling Studies
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Software - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The gap times between recurrent events are often of primary interest in medical and epidemiology studies. The observed gap times cannot be naively treated as clustered survival data in analysis because of the sequential structure of recurrent events. This paper introduces two important building blocks, the averaged counting process and the averaged at-risk process, for the development of the weighted risk-set (WRS) estimation methods. We demonstrate that with the use of these two empirical processes, existing risk-set based methods for univariate survival time data can be easily extended to analyze recurrent gap times. Additionally, we propose a modified within-cluster resampling (MWCR) method that can be easily implemented in standard software. We show that the MWCR estimators are asymptotically equivalent to the WRS estimators. An analysis of hospitalization data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register is presented to illustrate the proposed methods.
PubMed ID
20963733 View in PubMed
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Assessing violence risk and psychopathy in juvenile and adult offenders: a survey of clinical practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145664
Source
Assessment. 2010 Sep;17(3):377-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Jodi L Viljoen
Kaitlyn McLachlan
Gina M Vincent
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. jviljoen@sfu.ca
Source
Assessment. 2010 Sep;17(3):377-95
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antisocial Personality Disorder - classification - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Risk assessment
United States - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study surveyed 199 forensic clinicians about the practices that they use in assessing violence risk in juvenile and adult offenders. Results indicated that the use of risk assessment and psychopathy tools was common. Although clinicians reported more routine use of psychopathy measures in adult risk assessments compared with juvenile risks assessments, 79% of clinicians reported using psychopathy measures at least once in a while in juvenile risk assessments. Extremely few clinicians, however, believe that juveniles should be labeled or referred to as psychopaths. Juvenile risk reports were more likely than adult reports to routinely discuss treatment and protective factors, and provide recommendations to reevaluate risk. The implications of these findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
20124429 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of general hospital emergency room personnel towards attempted suicide patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160415
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(5):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kirsi Suominen
Jaana Suokas
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. kirsi.suominen@ktl.fi
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(5):387-92
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - supply & distribution
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the attitudes of emergency room staff towards patients who have attempted suicide between two general hospitals, one with psychiatric consultation available and the other without. The Understanding Suicidal Patients (USP) Questionnaire was given to all staff in the emergency rooms of Jorvi Hospital (in the city of Espoo, with routine psychiatric consultation) and Malmi Hospital (in the city of Helsinki, without routine psychiatric consultation) (n=115). There were clear differences in staff attitudes between the hospitals. Female gender, older age and working in Malmi Hospital without routine psychiatric consultation were associated with more positive attitudes towards attempted suicide patients. Surprisingly, only working in Jorvi Hospital was associated with more negative attitudes. Differences in attitudes towards suicide attempters between personnel working in the different hospitals were found. Further investigation is needed to find the ideal psychiatric consultation arrangement for suicide attempters in good cooperation with emergency room staff.
PubMed ID
17990201 View in PubMed
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108 records – page 1 of 11.