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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child psychiatric consultation service to community agencies: a collaborative approach involving three community agencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207797
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Aug;42(6):656-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
A. Froese
P. Dwyer-Sepic
K. Parker
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Aug;42(6):656-8
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - education
Child
Child Psychiatry - education
Child Welfare
Community Mental Health Services
Education, Medical
Humans
Internship and Residency
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Patient care team
Referral and Consultation
Rural Population
Abstract
To report the early experience of a multiagency child psychiatric consultation service.
The program is described, and the demographic characteristics of clients referred to the consultation program over the first 25 months of operation are presented. Referrals were examined for demographics and the questions consultees wanted to have answered.
In 59 of 100 consultations, physical and/or sexual abuse was proved or highly suspected. In 82 of the 100 cases, consultees had questions pertaining to management issues. Questions related to diagnostic issues numbered 62, and there were 45 questions about safety issues.
Effective psychiatric consultations services to rural areas can be established. Once established, the questions of consultees can provide an effective training ground for future community-oriented child psychiatrists.
PubMed ID
9288429 View in PubMed
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The function of the multidisciplinary team in child psychiatry--clinical and educational aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214658
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Aug;40(6):348-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
C E Benierakis
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Montreal Children's Hospital, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Aug;40(6):348-53
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - education
Adult
Child
Child Psychiatry - education
Community Mental Health Services
Curriculum
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Patient care team
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To present experiences with teams in a university hospital and various community settings that promote the learning of collaboration among different professionals.
Research in developmental psychopathology has increasingly linked childhood vulnerabilities and risk factors to adolescent and adult disorders. In this context the multidisciplinary teams can be seen as the expression of the expanding knowledge and expertise of the medical and allied health professionals, which can be directed toward promotion of health as well as prevention and cure of illness.
Collaboration reflects the application of biopsychosocial principles to consultation and research both in the community and in hospital, and the general trend in medicine to move from solo to team practice.
Psychiatrists have the obligation to promote, develop and maintain the psychosocial and personal dimension in the teaching and practice of medicine.
PubMed ID
7585406 View in PubMed
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Mental health services in the family physician's office: a Canadian experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204934
Source
Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci. 1998;35(2):104-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
N. Kates
M. Craven
A M Crustolo
L. Nikoloau
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci. 1998;35(2):104-13
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Curriculum
Family Practice - education
Humans
Mental health services
Patient care team
Psychiatry - education
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
This paper describes a program in Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario, Canada, that brings mental health counselors and psychiatrists into the offices of 87 local family physicians, working in 35 practices serving 170,000 people. It outlines the organization of the mental health teams in the family physician's office and the way in which these teams are coordinated and discusses how this "shared care" approach can overcome many of the problems that traditionally bedevil the relationship between psychiatric services and family practices. It summarizes the benefits of this approach for patients providers and the health care system and looks at its implications for learners and for new approaches to continuing education. This model can be adapted to most communities.
PubMed ID
9689776 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychiatric consultation and teaching in a home for the aged.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252032
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1975 Aug;26(8):509-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1975
Author
D. Dawson
C. English
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1975 Aug;26(8):509-11
Date
Aug-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community Psychiatry
Education, Continuing
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Geriatric Nursing - education
Geriatric Psychiatry - education
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Nursing Staff
Ontario
Patient care team
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychiatric Nursing
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
An outpatient psychiatric department of a medical center was organized as a community psychiatry team to provide direct services, consultation and education, and preventive programs for high-risk groups. By successfully handling requests for service from a home for the aged, the team established a consultative relationship and then a six-month teaching program centered on problems presented by the home's staff in group sessions. Results included a drop in requests for direct service, the establishment of group programs for residents, and an increase in the home's willingness to accept and deal with disturbed behavior without resort to hospitalization.
PubMed ID
1165085 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sharing mental health care. Training psychiatry residents to work with primary care physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199579
Source
Psychosomatics. 2000 Jan-Feb;41(1):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
N. Kates
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Psychosomatics. 2000 Jan-Feb;41(1):53-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Humans
Internship and Residency
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Mental Health Services - manpower
Ontario
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Teaching
Abstract
Overcoming problems in communication between psychiatry and primary care requires new models of collaboration. Their success will depend upon the ability of participants to work productively with each other, which will require psychiatry residency programs to offer appropriate preparation for future graduates in working with primary care physicians. This article, based on the training at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, describes a brief curriculum for training psychiatry residents to work effectively with primary care physicians that can be easily integrated with current training rotations and looks at adjustments academic departments need to make to support such programs.
PubMed ID
10665268 View in PubMed
Less detail

Teaching consultation-liaison psychotherapy: assessment of adaptation to medical and surgical illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161258
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2007 Sep-Oct;31(5):367-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jonathan J Hunter
Robert G Maunder
Mona Gupta
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2007 Sep-Oct;31(5):367-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Curriculum
Defense Mechanisms
Hospitalization
Humans
Internship and Residency
Life Change Events
Object Attachment
Ontario
Patient care team
Personality Assessment
Physician's Role
Psychiatry - education
Psychotherapy - education
Referral and Consultation
Sick Role
Social Environment
Surgery Department, Hospital
Abstract
Little has been written about teaching consultation-liaison inpatient psychotherapy to residents or other trainees.
Resident interviews at completion of consultation-liaison training identified learning needs. In response, the authors created a seminar series and modified it reiteratively eight times.
In this approach, the primary task of consultation-liaison psychotherapy assessment is to determine the success of a patient's adaptation to hospitalization, and to identify obstacles to adaptation. Selected determinants of adaptation are reviewed and organized as individual factors and intrahospital and extrahospital environmental factors. This provides a viable means of organizing and integrating disparate bodies of knowledge for the student.
The teaching model awaits empirical validation as a tool that enhances teaching and patient care outcomes.
PubMed ID
17875621 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The medical association on psychiatry report: By all means an improved psychotherapy but other treatment methods should still be considered]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43006
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 May 22;71(21):2166-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-1974

9 records – page 1 of 1.