Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14 records – page 1 of 2.

Collaboration between child psychiatry and paediatrics: the state of the relationship in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35705
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Aug;83(8):884-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
I H Vandvik
Author Affiliation
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, National Hospital of Norway, Oslo.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Aug;83(8):884-7
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Psychiatry - education
Humans
Inservice training
Interprofessional Relations
Norway
Pediatrics - education
Abstract
In Norway, the first paediatric department was founded in Oslo 100 years ago. The first child psychiatric department was opened in 1950. To assess qualitative and quantitative aspects of child psychiatric liaison work, questionnaires were sent to the heads of 25 paediatric departments and 53 child psychiatric units. Scarce child psychiatric resources were spent in paediatrics. The average score for satisfaction with collaboration was moderate (5.5 on a 10-cm visual analogue scale) and agreement between the parties was modest. Improvement will involve development of a common language and a shared model for understanding the psychosocial aspects of acute and chronic childhood illnesses. In-service training for paediatricians in child psychiatry and vice versa may help. Both parties indicated a need for more training in consultation/liaison and in multi-professional assessments and therapeutic interventions with children with physical illnesses.
PubMed ID
7981570 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing a training program to improve supervisor-resident relationships, step 1: defining the types of issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195032
Source
Teach Learn Med. 2001;13(2):80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Sinai
R G Tiberius
J. de Groot
A. Brunet
P. Voore
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. j.sinai@utoronto.ca
Source
Teach Learn Med. 2001;13(2):80-5
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Feedback
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Interprofessional Relations
Mentors
Organizational Objectives
Pilot Projects
Power (Psychology)
Program Development
Psychiatry - education
Abstract
By some estimates, the teacher-learner relationship explains roughly half of the variance attributed to the effectiveness of teaching. Despite this, relationships largely have been ignored in the educational literature.
This qualitative pilot study sought to identify factors in the supervisor-resident relationship that hinder learning among University of Toronto psychiatry residents.
Thirteen postgraduate-year residents in Years 2-5 and their supervisors were interviewed regarding interactions that either assisted or adversely affected learning.
Qualitative analysis of the interview data led to the identification of 5 types of issues affecting the supervisory relationship: goals and individual differences, communication and feedback, power and rivalry, support and collegiality, and role modeling and expertise. Face validity was supported when typed anonymous written feedback obtained from annual supervisor evaluations also could be organized into the 5 categories.
Recognition of the types of interpersonal interactions that assist or hinder learning may contribute to enhanced teaching effectiveness.
PubMed ID
11302035 View in PubMed
Less detail

Family physicians and psychiatrists. Qualitative study of physicians' views on collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189861
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 May;48:923-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Ricardo J M Lucena
Alain Lesage
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche Fernand-Seguin, Hôpital Louis-H Lafontaine, 7331 rue Hochelaga, Montreal, QC H1N 3V2.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 May;48:923-9
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Mental Disorders - therapy
Psychiatry - education
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To understand how to improve collaboration between psychiatrists and family physicians in primary care settings.
Qualitative study using 10 in-depth interviews and a focus group session.
Catchment area in eastern Montreal, Que.
Five FPs and five psychiatrists.
Ten interviews and a focus group were conducted to identify ways of improving collaboration between FPs and psychiatrists. All session were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysts used Atlas.ti to compare findings vertically and horizontally.
Three strategies were identified: communication, continuing medical education (CME) for FPs, and access to consulting psychiatrists. The first two can be implemented by FPs and psychiatrists together, but psychiatrists thought the last one was not feasible due to lack of both time and remuneration for such activity.
Better communication and CME for FPs in psychiatry can help improve collaboration between FPs and psychiatrists. Increased access to consulting psychiatrists requires substantial alteration in established clinical roles and routines.
Notes
Cites: Br Med J. 1974 Mar 16;1(5906):505-74817165
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1999 Mar;48(3):180-710086760
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1981 Jan 31;282(6261):375-76780033
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1987 Apr;32(3):170-43567831
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1987 Mar;9(2):102-103569884
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1988 Nov;10(6):431-73203884
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Jul 22;299(6693):238-402504381
Cites: Med J Aust. 1992 Mar 16;156(6):379-821545744
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1992 Feb;37(1):2-61551041
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1992 Nov;149(11):1499-5051357992
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Mar;38(2):79-828467447
Cites: Psychosomatics. 1994 May-Jun;35(3):268-788036256
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Sep 6;274(9):700-57650822
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1996 Mar;42:387-9, 397-4008616275
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 1996 May;47(5):522-68740495
Cites: Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1996 Apr;30(2):278-868811273
Cites: Sante Ment Que. 1996 Spring;21(1):79-958932218
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Feb;43:251-69040912
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1997 Aug;171:169-749337955
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Nov;42(9):950-49429065
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Nov;42(9):955-99429066
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Nov;42(9):960-59429067
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1998 Mar;155(3):397-4049501752
Cites: Med J Aust. 1998 Feb 16;168(4):162-59507711
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Jun;33(6):291-89640098
Cites: Psychol Med. 1979 May;9(2):337-53472079
PubMed ID
12053637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improving health centre physicians' child-psychiatric networks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173781
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Mar;23(1):26-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Anneli Heikkinen
Kaija Puura
Karp Mattila
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Tampere, Finland. anneli.heikkinen@uta.fi
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Mar;23(1):26-7
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Psychiatry - education - standards
Clinical Competence
Community health centers - standards
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education - standards
Finland
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study changes in Finnish GPs' child-psychiatric networks over a one-year period.
Postal questionnaire.
Health centres in the area of Tampere University Hospital with a catchment population of one million.
A one-off course in the field of child psychiatry was held 56 times in different health centres.
GPs (n = 761) working in the area received a questionnaire in 2000 and 2001. Those responding in both years were included in the analysis (n = 371).
A fill-in picture was used to identify professionals in the network of each GP. Three levels were analysed: (1) health centre, (2) municipality, and (3) secondary healthcare.
The number of collaborators increased significantly only in the training group at municipality level. No statistically significant differences were found in proportions of GPs naming cooperating persons.
The impact of a one-off training programme on the scope of GPs' child-psychiatric networks was not very strong but was in accordance with the aims of the programme.
PubMed ID
16025870 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Pediatricians help starving child psychiatry]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44531
Source
Lakartidningen. 1968 Jun 12;65(24):2478-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1968
Author
B. Söderling
Source
Lakartidningen. 1968 Jun 12;65(24):2478-80
Date
Jun-12-1968
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Psychiatry - education
Child, Preschool
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Pediatrics
Sweden
PubMed ID
5725053 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychiatric training in rural and remote areas: increasing skills and building partnerships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172191
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;50(9):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005

14 records – page 1 of 2.