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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approaching the vulnerability of refugees: evaluation of cross-cultural psychiatric training of staff in mental health care and refugee reception in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262133
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2014;14:207
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Sofie Bäärnhielm
Ann-Sofie Edlund
Michael Ioannou
Marie Dahlin
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2014;14:207
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cultural Competency - education
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Mental health services
Psychiatry - education
Refugees - psychology
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
This study evaluates the outcomes of cross-cultural mental health training given to professionals in health care and refugee reception in Stockholm, Sweden.
A mixed method approach, with quantitative data from questionnaires (n?=?232) and ten qualitative focus group interviews, was used.
After training, the participants reported that the hindering effect of lack of knowledge on their work decreased significantly from 2.81 (SD1.22) before, to 2.29 (SD1.00) (p?
Notes
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-8816204405
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:1517266765
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;23 Suppl 1:14-2018371575
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2012 Feb 1;63(2):147-5322302332
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;27 Suppl 2:S70-522863254
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Apr 9-15;365(9467):1309-1415823380
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):1153-6122552872
PubMed ID
25262446 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Criminal Code provisions for mentally disordered offenders: a survey of experiences, attitudes, and knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196183
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Nov;45(9):816-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
A S Crisanti
J. Arboleda-Florez
H. Stuart
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, Kealakekua, Hawaii, USA. crisanti@hawaii.edu
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Nov;45(9):816-21
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Clinical Competence
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - education
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Continuing
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - education
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Insanity Defense
Male
Middle Aged
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence
Psychiatry - education
Abstract
To systematically survey Alberta psychiatrists and lawyers regarding their knowledge of, attitudes toward, and experiences with the Criminal Code provisions regarding mentally disordered offenders to better understand the lack of impact in practice patterns.
A survey design was used, and 2 questionnaires, 1 for lawyers and 1 for psychiatrists, were developed and mailed out.
Out of 245 surveys sent to psychiatrists, 141 were returned, giving a response rate of 57%. The number of lawyers practising criminal law could not be determined, and 5273 surveys were sent to all lawyers on the Law Society of Alberta mailing list. Of these, 564 were returned, giving an overall response rate of 11%. The response rate for lawyers practising criminal law is unknown. Overall, lawyers were younger than psychiatrists. Most of the respondents in both groups were men. Overall, attitudes toward offenders with mental illness were very similar among lawyers and psychiatrists. Compared with lawyers, psychiatrists had significantly more correct responses to the items assessing knowledge. With a highest possible knowledge score of 27, the average score was 16 (SD 5.7) for psychiatrists and 13 (SD 7.23) for lawyers.
The lack of familiarity with many of the key provisions among psychiatrists and lawyers is worrisome and suggests the need for educational materials to improve knowledge of the Criminal Code provisions governing mentally disordered offenders.
PubMed ID
11143831 View in PubMed
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Canadian geriatric psychiatrists: why do they do it? A Delphi study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190381
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;47(3):250-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Susan Lieff
Diana Clarke
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Toronto, Ontario. s.lieff@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;47(3):250-6
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Career Choice
Delphi Technique
Female
Geriatric Psychiatry - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Abstract
To generate hypotheses regarding influential factors that have contributed to the practice of geriatric psychiatry by geriatric psychiatrists.
Using the Delphi technique, designed to generate ideas and consensus, a sample of members of the Canadian Academy of Geriatric Psychiatry (CAGP) was asked to provide ideas on what factors were influential in their decision to devote a significant part of their practice to geriatric patients. These items were then synthesized into a questionnaire and rated for their degree of influence by the same group of psychiatrists.
A total of 41 items were rated according to their degree of influence. The most influential items were related to geriatric psychiatry residency training experiences that were perceived to be positive or adequate. Supervision characteristics and interest in the medical psychiatric nature of the field were also deemed influential.
This study generates the hypothesis that the nature of the educational experience during psychiatry residency has a significant influence on the practice of geriatric psychiatry.
PubMed ID
11987476 View in PubMed
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Canadian training for residents from developing countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109585
Source
Can Psychiatr Assoc J. 1970 Apr;15(2):111-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1970

[Central American seminars for young psychiatrists of the region and training of leaders in community mental health. Sweden/PAHO-WHO collaboration program]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73150
Source
Acta Psiquiatr Psicol Am Lat. 1994 Sep;40(3):249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
U. Penayo
G. Kullgrèn
L. Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Psiquiatría, Universidad de Umeå, Suecia.
Source
Acta Psiquiatr Psicol Am Lat. 1994 Sep;40(3):249-52
Date
Sep-1994
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Central America
Community Psychiatry - education
Education, Medical, Graduate
English Abstract
Female
Humans
International Educational Exchange
Male
Sweden
World Health Organization
Abstract
The Swedish Psychiatric Association, in collaboration with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Umeå, Sweden, and the Pan American Health Organization/WHO, has obtained economic support from the Swedish Agency for International Development (ASDI), to organize training seminars for young psychiatrists from Central America. The program will continue until 1995 with an option to pursue further studies leading to a master or other post-graduate degrees. The overall purpose is to strengthen the knowledge in epidemiology and community mental health, along the lines set by the "Caracas Declaration" of a cadre of young leaders in the field of psychiatry in Central America.
PubMed ID
7872030 View in PubMed
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The certification examination: opinions of royal college examiners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243000
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1982 Aug;27(5):357-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982
Author
H. Prosen
P. Leichner
D. Harper
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1982 Aug;27(5):357-61
Date
Aug-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Certification
Clinical Competence
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatry - education
Specialty Boards
Abstract
There has been increasing concern among candidates and psychiatrists regarding the Canadian written and oral certification examinations. Views of candidates and psychiatrists have been obtained. The results presented in this survey were obtained through a questionnaire that was completed by 64 past and present Royal College examiners. General support for the establishment of guidelines for the selection of examiners, for increased emphasis on the use of in-training evaluations and for the need of clear operational criteria for examiners and candidates was voiced. Finally, the evaluation model that most responding examiners favoured included re-introducing one part essay into the written examination. Overall, although finding it exhausting, most examiners enjoy examining and are satisfied with the present system. Recommendations concerning improvements to the present system are presented.
PubMed ID
7116273 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical coaching in forensic psychiatry: an innovative program to recruit and retain nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150619
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2009 May;47(5):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Gail Thorpe
Pamela Moorhouse
Carolyn Antonello
Author Affiliation
Schizophrenia Clinic, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. gthorpe@rohcg.on.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2009 May;47(5):43-7
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Career Choice
Curriculum
Forensic Nursing - education - manpower
Forensic Psychiatry - education - manpower
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Mentors - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Ontario is currently experiencing a nursing shortage crisis. Recruitment and retention of nursing staff are critical issues. In response, retention strategies have been developed by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The Late Career Nurse Initiative is one such strategy. This innovative program encourages nurses age 55 and older to remain in the workforce by providing opportunities to use their nursing experience in less physically demanding alternate roles for a portion of their time. The Royal Ottawa Health Care Group has developed a clinical coach program in forensics that matches these veteran nurses with new graduates or nurses new to forensic psychiatric nursing. The program has resulted in retention rates of more than 91% after 1 year. This article provides background about the program and highlights its outcomes.
PubMed ID
19489514 View in PubMed
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Consultation-liaison psychiatry as a subspecialty. A Canadian survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220010
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1993 Nov;15(6):386-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1993
Author
J R Swenson
S. Abbey
D E Stewart
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Service, Ottawa General Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1993 Nov;15(6):386-91
Date
Nov-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Curriculum - trends
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - trends
Psychiatry - education - trends
Psychosomatic Medicine - education - trends
Referral and Consultation - trends
Specialization - trends
Abstract
In Canada, in recent years, there has been increased interest in the issue of subspecialization in psychiatry. One hundred and forty-four members of the Section on Psychosomatic Medicine of the Canadian Psychiatric Association responded to a survey about their opinions on teaching, training, continuing education, and designation of consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry as a subspecialty. Fifty-five percent of respondents agreed that C-L psychiatry should receive designation as a psychiatric subspecialty, 35% were opposed, and 10% did not give an opinion. The results also indicated that formal teaching in C-L psychiatry has increased, particularly over the past 20 years; that training in C-L psychiatry is believed by many to have been inadequate, regardless of when the training took place; and recent graduates were more likely than psychiatrists graduating more than 10 years ago to agree that C-L psychiatry should be designated as a subspecialty. Psychiatrists who devote more of their time to the care of patients with combined medical and psychiatric illness were also more likely to favor subspecialty designation. Factors unique to Canada that may influence attitudes toward psychiatric subspecialization include the number and geographic distribution of psychiatrists, their educational background, and governmental funding priorities.
PubMed ID
8112562 View in PubMed
Less detail

56 records – page 1 of 6.