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Evaluating psychiatry residents as physician-managers: development of an assessment tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117049
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2013 Jan 1;37(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2013
Author
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Vicky Stergiopoulos
Julie D Maggi
Ari Zaretsky
Laura Stovel
Brian Hodges
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto;the Dept. of Psychiatry, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sanjeev.sockalingam@uhn.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2013 Jan 1;37(1):11-7
Date
Jan-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Curriculum - standards
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Interview, Psychological
Male
Patient Care Team - standards
Physicians - standards
Psychiatry - education
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
With the emergence of physician-manager (PM) curricula in medical education, more effective assessment tools are needed to evaluate psychiatry trainees in this role. The aim of this study was to determine psychiatry residents', program directors', and PM educators' perceptions about PM role-assessment.
Psychiatry residents at two Canadian programs were given a survey on PM assessment and the use of portfolios to assess PM competency. Qualitative interviews of Canadian psychiatry educators and program directors were used to determine faculty perceptions on PM assessment. Authors analyzed survey data with descriptive statistics, and qualitative interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach.
Nearly 55% of psychiatry residents responded to the survey; 47% of residents did not want to change the way they were assessed by the PM role. Residents identified an array of assessment methods for each of the specific PM domains. Educator interview themes included supervisor and resident barriers to assessment, the need for new PM assessment approaches integrating multiple assessment methods, and a role for the use of portfolios if sufficient infrastructure was available.
The data supported a preference for a multimodal approach to assessment of the PM role. Future research should examine the implementation of the proposed PM assessment tool.
PubMed ID
23338865 View in PubMed
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Residents' perceived physician-manager educational needs: a national survey of psychiatry residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153634
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;53(11):745-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Vicky Stergiopoulos
Julie Maggi
Author Affiliation
Medical and Surgical Psychiatry Program, University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. Sanjeev.Sockalingam@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;53(11):745-52
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Education, Medical
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Mentors
Practice Management
Professional Competence
Psychiatry - education
Questionnaires
Abstract
To determine Canadian psychiatry residents' perceived gaps in physician-manager competencies during their residency training.
Residents at 16 Canadian psychiatry residency programs were mailed an 11-item questionnaire (a copy is available from the authors) assessing their perceived deficiencies in selected managerial knowledge (GSk) and skill (GSs) areas as determined by gap scores (GS). GSs are defined as the difference between residents' perceived current and desired level of knowledge or skill in selected physician-manager domains. Residents' educational preferences were also elicited in the questionnaire.
Among the 494 psychiatry residents who were sent the survey, 237 residents (48%) responded. Residents reported the greatest GSk in Program Planning and the greatest GSs in Personal and Professional Self-Care. Predictors of greater total GSks included a lack of previous administrative education during medical school, higher training level, and female sex. Only sex was a significant predictor of total GSss. More than 50% of residents preferred workshops, small groups, mentoring, and didactic learning methods for furthering their knowledge and skills.
Residents report significant gaps in specific physician-manager training areas, specifically Program Planning, and Personal and Professional Self-Care. The results of this national survey can inform the development of formal physician-manager curricula. To appeal to residents, such curricula should incorporate more interactive pedagogical methods combined with mentoring opportunities.
PubMed ID
19087468 View in PubMed
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Teaching and learning the physician manager role: psychiatry residents' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141974
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(7):e308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Vicky Stergiopoulos
Julie Maggi
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. stergiopoulosv@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(7):e308-14
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Ontario
Physician Executives - education
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Psychiatry - education
Abstract
Despite widespread consensus that additional training in administration is needed to prepare physicians for practice, little is known about how best to teach managerial competencies and how to integrate teaching into existing postgraduate curricula.
This study aimed to elicit resident perspectives on administrative curriculum development following exposure to a pilot physician manager curriculum at the University of Toronto.
The authors held five focus groups of psychiatry residents at the University of Toronto during 2008, engaging 40 trainees. Resident perspectives on barriers to teaching and learning administrative skills, preferred curriculum content and format and suggestions for integration of administrative training into the residency programme were elicited.
Identified barriers to learning include lack of physician manager role clarity, dearth of learning opportunities and multiple competing demands on residents' time. Residents value a formal administrative curriculum and propose additional opportunities for experiential learning such as elective rotations and mentorship opportunities. Suggested strategies for integrating administrative teaching into residency include faculty development, rotation-specific administrative objectives and end of rotation resident evaluations.
Our findings provide valuable learner input into an emerging educational framework aiming to address barriers to teaching administrative skills during residency and facilitate longitudinal reinforcement of learning.
PubMed ID
20653374 View in PubMed
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Teaching the physician-manager role to psychiatric residents: development and implementation of a pilot curriculum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151299
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2009 Mar-Apr;33(2):125-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Vicky Stergiopoulos
Julie Maggi
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8, Canada. stergiopoulosv@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2009 Mar-Apr;33(2):125-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Curriculum
Education
Education, Medical, Graduate
Hospitals, University
Humans
Internship and Residency
Leadership
Ontario
Physician Executives - education
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychiatry - education
Abstract
The authors describe a pilot physician-manager curriculum designed to address the learning needs of psychiatric residents in administrative psychiatry and health systems.
The pilot curriculum includes a junior and a senior toolkit of four workshops each. The junior toolkit introduces postgraduate-year two (PGY-2) residents to the principles of teamwork, conflict resolution, quality improvement, and program planning and evaluation. The senior toolkit exposes PGY-4 residents to leadership and change management, organizational structures, mental health and addictions reform, and self and career development. Following curriculum implementation at the University of Toronto, residents rated the importance and clinical relevance of curriculum objectives and commented on the strengths and weaknesses of the workshops and areas needing improvement.
The pilot curriculum was successfully introduced at the University of Toronto in 2006. Residents rated the curriculum very highly and commented that interactive learning and contextually relevant topics are essential in meeting their needs.
It is possible to successfully introduce a physician-manager curriculum early during psychiatric residency training, to match the specific needs of clinical rotations. Interactive techniques and clinical illustrations may be crucial in facilitating teaching and learning the physician-manager role. The authors discuss barriers, facilitators, and critical success factors in implementing such a curriculum.
PubMed ID
19398625 View in PubMed
Less detail