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Evaluating psychiatry residents as physician-managers: development of an assessment tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117049
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2013 Jan 1;37(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2013
Author
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Vicky Stergiopoulos
Julie D Maggi
Ari Zaretsky
Laura Stovel
Brian Hodges
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto;the Dept. of Psychiatry, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sanjeev.sockalingam@uhn.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2013 Jan 1;37(1):11-7
Date
Jan-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Curriculum - standards
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Interview, Psychological
Male
Patient Care Team - standards
Physicians - standards
Psychiatry - education
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
With the emergence of physician-manager (PM) curricula in medical education, more effective assessment tools are needed to evaluate psychiatry trainees in this role. The aim of this study was to determine psychiatry residents', program directors', and PM educators' perceptions about PM role-assessment.
Psychiatry residents at two Canadian programs were given a survey on PM assessment and the use of portfolios to assess PM competency. Qualitative interviews of Canadian psychiatry educators and program directors were used to determine faculty perceptions on PM assessment. Authors analyzed survey data with descriptive statistics, and qualitative interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach.
Nearly 55% of psychiatry residents responded to the survey; 47% of residents did not want to change the way they were assessed by the PM role. Residents identified an array of assessment methods for each of the specific PM domains. Educator interview themes included supervisor and resident barriers to assessment, the need for new PM assessment approaches integrating multiple assessment methods, and a role for the use of portfolios if sufficient infrastructure was available.
The data supported a preference for a multimodal approach to assessment of the PM role. Future research should examine the implementation of the proposed PM assessment tool.
PubMed ID
23338865 View in PubMed
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Neuroimaging week: a novel, engaging, and effective curriculum for teaching neuroimaging to junior psychiatric residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144917
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2010 Mar-Apr;34(2):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jonathan Downar
Adriana Krizova
Omar Ghaffar
Ari Zaretsky
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jonathan.downar@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2010 Mar-Apr;34(2):119-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain - anatomy & histology - pathology - radiography
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Electroencephalography - methods
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Psychiatry - education
Questionnaires
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Neuroimaging techniques are increasingly important in psychiatric research and clinical practice, but few postgraduate psychiatry programs offer formal training in neuroimaging. To address this need, the authors developed a course to prepare psychiatric residents to use neuroimaging techniques effectively in independent practice.
The authors present the format and curriculum of a highly interactive, 5-day intensive neuroimaging course, taught by psychiatry, neurology, radiology, nuclear medicine, and sleep medicine staff, covering psychiatrically oriented neuroanatomy; neuroimaging techniques and principles; clinical skills, including interpretation of computed tomography and MRI in neuropsychiatric cases; and formal approaches to critiquing neuroimaging research and applying its findings to clinical practice. Detailed questionnaires assessed the subjective and objective impact of the course on residents' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, neuroimaging in psychiatry before and after the course.
Twenty-five first-year residents completed the questionnaires. Participants were enthusiastic about the content and interested in improving their skills in interpreting clinical neuroimaging studies. By the end of the course, residents also reported large gains in subjective comfort level with neuroimaging literature appraisal and functional neuroanatomy and believed that the course was effective in meeting their own specific learning objectives. Objective measures showed significant gains in most areas of the curriculum.
This short, intensive course effectively teaches clinically oriented neuroimaging principles to psychiatric residents and can be readily adapted to other postgraduate programs or continuing medical education.
PubMed ID
20224021 View in PubMed
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Preparing international medical graduates for psychiatry residency: a multi-site needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122077
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 1;36(4):277-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2012
Author
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Raed Hawa
Mazin Al-Battran
Susan E Abbey
Ari Zaretsky
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University Health Network & University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sanjeev.sockalingam@uhn.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 1;36(4):277-81
Date
Jul-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication Barriers
Delivery of Health Care
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Foreign Medical Graduates - psychology
Humans
Internship and Residency
Medical Records
Needs Assessment
Psychiatry - education
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Abstract
Despite the growing number of international medical graduates (IMGs) training in medicine in Canada and the United States, IMG-specific challenges early in psychiatry residency have not been fully explored. Therefore, the authors conducted a needs-assessment survey to determine the needs of IMGs transitioning into psychiatry residency.
Using a 15-item online questionnaire, authors conducted a needs-assessment of IMG residents in five Canadian psychiatry residency programs. The survey examined IMGs' perceived difficulties with the transition into psychiatry residency, educational needs, and demographic data. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney tests.
IMGs identified the following difficulties with their transition into residency: understanding the healthcare system, medical documentation, and evidence-based medicine/mental health. Language barriers and social isolation were significant factors affecting the transition into residency for residents who did not speak English as their first language. Residents who lived in Canada 12 months or less had greater perceived difficulties in psychotherapy knowledge and adapting to the Canadian healthcare system; 88% of IMGs reported having little-or-no IMG-specific preparation for psychiatry residency from their psychiatry program; however, 69% reported that they would use IMG resources if offered; 63% felt that faculty in their program should undergo training to assist with IMG transition.
Several perceived challenges, needs, and gaps in training were reported by IMGs in Canadian psychiatry residency programs. The results of this survey will be used to inform future curriculum development to facilitate IMG transition into psychiatry postgraduate training programs.
PubMed ID
22851023 View in PubMed
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