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2172 records – page 1 of 218.

The 2-year course following detoxification treatment of substance abuse: the possible influence of psychiatric comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11106
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tómasson
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Landspítalinn, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the course and outcome in a nationwide representative sample (n = 351) of treatment-seeking substance users over a 28-month period was studied prospectively. The patients were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and a questionnaire on drinking history. At 16 and 28 months after admission the patients returned a questionnaire on drinking history and mental health. In cases of those lacking information on either follow-up (45%), details on drinking status was obtained from informants. Completely abstinent were 16%. Generalized anxiety disorder and/or social phobia at the index admission predicted abstinence during the follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.25], whereas onset of alcoholism among these patients after age 25 years predicted a worse prognosis (OR = 13.5). Also increasing number of social consequences related to abuse (OR = 1.3) and drinking more than the median (OR = 2.1) predicted a poor outcome. The abstinent group had significantly better mental health at follow-up. The patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders at admission were worse at follow-up. Although substance use disorders and comorbid psychiatric disorders have to a certain degree separate courses, there is nevertheless significant interaction between them. Early treatment and recognition of comorbid psychiatric disorders among substance abusers is necessary.
PubMed ID
9477012 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 year survey of pretrial examinations in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246688
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
R. Kunjukrishnan
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Crime
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The results of a survey of pretrial examination cases admitted to the provincial psychiatric hospital in Saskatchewan from 1966 to 1975 are reported. The demographic and psychiatric data and data from the psychiatric reports to the Court are analyzed. Some deficiencies noted in the reports to the Court are discussed and some remedial measures are suggested.
PubMed ID
519634 View in PubMed
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A 24-Year Follow-up Study on Recidivism in Male Mentally Disordered Sexual Offenders With and Without Psychotic Disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311282
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2020 Sep; 65(5):1610-1618
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
Christian Baudin
Thomas Nilsson
Märta Wallinius
Joakim Sturup
Peter Andiné
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2020 Sep; 65(5):1610-1618
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Criminals
Follow-Up Studies
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Mentally Ill Persons - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Recidivism - statistics & numerical data
Sex Offenses
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of knowledge on mentally disordered sex offenders (MDSOs) targeting adult victims, especially regarding recidivism patterns and the specific subgroup with psychiatric disorders. This paper presents index offense data, clinical data, and recidivism patterns over up to 24 years in a cohort of 146 MDSOs, with and without psychotic disorders, sentenced in Sweden between 1993 and 1997. At the time of the offense, all offenders were affected by clinical, developmental, and criminal history factors. MDSOs with psychotic disorders only marginally differed from those without, the former being less likely to have been institutionalized during childhood, intoxicated during the index offense, or diagnosed with a personality disorder, substance use disorder, or paraphilic disorder. In the cohort, 3.4% of the MDSOs were reconvicted for a new sex offense over 2 years, 9.6% over 5 years, 13.0% over 10 years, and 17.1% over the entire follow-up period of 24 years. In MDSOs with psychotic disorders, no subjects were reconvicted during the first 2 years, while 2.6% were reconvicted over 5 years, 5.3% over 10 years, and 7.9% over 24 years. Recidivism rates for violent and general reoffenses were 39.0% and 37.7%, respectively, for the cohort of MDSOs, and subjects with psychotic disorders reoffended significantly later in general offenses. In conclusion, MDSOs with psychotic disorders showed the same recidivism pattern as MDSOs without psychotic disorders. Furthermore, recidivism research may preferably focus on follow-up periods of 5-10 years since most offenders appear to recidivate within this timeframe.
PubMed ID
32311773 View in PubMed
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[25th anniversary of the Moscow Children's Psychiatric Hospital No. 6].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236035
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1987;87(10):1557-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987

A 30-year follow-up study of a child psychiatric clientele. I. Demographic description.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68611
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
F W Larsen
V. Dahl
E. Hallum
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Psychiatry
Crime
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marriage
Mental Disorders - mortality - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Adjustment
Social Class
Abstract
A register investigation was carried out as of December 31, 1980, with the aim of giving a broad description of a child psychiatric clientele 30 years after admission to hospital. The material consists of 322 patients--189 boys (59%) and 133 girls (41%)--who were admitted during the period 1949-1951 to the only 2 child psychiatric departments at that time in Denmark. We succeeded in identifying 93% of the patients. The mean age at the time of analysis was 38.6 years (range 32-46). The material was compared with the age-related Danish population by marital status, vocational education, and socioeconomic class. A total of 115 patients (36%) had been admitted to an adult psychiatric department, and 50 patients only once. A total of 95 patients (30%) had committed criminal offences and 12 had only committed traffic offences. A total of 60 patients (19%) had obtained disability pensions. During the 30-year follow-up period, 19 patients (6%) had died. A statistically significant extra mortality was found only for women. Four patients had committed suicide. By logistic regression analysis, a statistically significant correlation was found between criminal record and admission to psychiatric department and the variables: divorce, no vocational education, and lowest socioeconomic class. About 54% had managed well, judging by the variables employed.
PubMed ID
2330827 View in PubMed
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[46 forensic psychiatric problems in cases of sexual abuse. Sex crime hysteria or public health problem?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34321
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Mar 26;94(13):1211-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-26-1997
Author
R. Schlaug
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Mar 26;94(13):1211-2
Date
Mar-26-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Sex Offenses
Sweden
PubMed ID
9148064 View in PubMed
Less detail

1157 Academic dissertations in psychiatry in Sweden 1858-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273606
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2015 Oct;132(4):316-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Hans Ågren
Lennart Wetterberg
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2015 Oct;132(4):316-7
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Psychiatry - education
Dissertations, Academic as Topic
Humans
Psychiatry - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
25955219 View in PubMed
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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
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About the concept of the "dangerous individual" in 19th-century legal psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248925
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1978 Feb;1(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1978
Author
M. Foucault
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1978 Feb;1(1):1-18
Date
Feb-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dangerous Behavior
Europe
Forensic Psychiatry - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Terminology as Topic
Violence
PubMed ID
374291 View in PubMed
Less detail

2172 records – page 1 of 218.