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Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist and Teachers' Report Form in a normative sample of Greek children 6-12 years old.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200370
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999 Sep;8(3):165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
A. Roussos
G. Karantanos
C. Richardson
C. Hartman
D. Karajiannis
S. Kyprianos
H. Lazaratou
O. Mahaira
M. Tassi
V. Zoubou
Author Affiliation
Attiki Child Psychiatry Hospital, 4 Garefi Street, 115 25 Athens, Greece. alrousou@ath.forthnet.gr
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999 Sep;8(3):165-72
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Female
Greece
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Reference Values
Schools
Sensitivity and specificity
Urban Population
Abstract
Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teachers' Report Form (TRF) were administered to 6-12 year old school children comprising a large random community sample (n = 1200) drawn from the whole of Greece. These are the first data on the TRF in Greece and the first nation-wide data on the CBCL. Appropriate cutoff points for the behavioral problems and competence scales of both questionnaires were obtained for boys and girls. These were considerably higher than USA cutoffs for the CBCL but not for the TRF. Analysis of scores in relation to degree of urbanization showed that it was not necessary to define different cutoffs in different strata. Parents' and teachers' ratings of the same child were most highly correlated for Externalizing and Aggressive behavior for boys and for Attention problems for both sexes.
PubMed ID
10550697 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia following myocardial infarction: psychometric properties and correlates of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192918
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2001 Sep;51(3):487-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
M. Kojima
N. Frasure-Smith
F. Lespérance
Author Affiliation
Research Centre Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2001 Sep;51(3):487-95
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose was to explore the psychometrics and correlates of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) after myocardial infarction (MI).
The TAS-20 and other self-report measures were administered 3-6 months after discharge to 1443 patients.
Good internal reliability was confirmed for the total TAS-20 and two subscales (F1 and F2). The F3 showed low internal consistency linked to negatively keyed items. The prevalence of alexithymia was 30.2% at the first interview. Alexithymics were older, less educated, more likely to have previous MIs and had higher scores on all measures of negative emotions. Six-month test-retest reliability was.47 (n=167). Residual change score analysis showed patients with more education and a first MI had greater decreases in alexithymia than expected.
The TAS-20 has adequate internal consistency in post-MI patients, and its correlates are similar to other reports. Low temporal stability suggests that secondary alexithymia is important after MI.
PubMed ID
11602218 View in PubMed
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The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
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An international psychometric testing of the care dependency scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198946
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Apr;31(4):944-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
A. Dijkstra
L. Brown
B. Havens
T I Romeren
R. Zanotti
T. Dassen
W. van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre For Healthcare Research, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. ate.dijkstra@med.rug.nl
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Apr;31(4):944-52
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dementia - diagnosis
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Norway
Nursing Homes
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In an international study, psychometric properties of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) were examined by analysing data gathered in Dutch, Canadian, Italian and Norwegian nursing homes. For that purpose, from these countries a convenience sample was developed consisting of 525 patients with dementia. The English, Italian and Norwegian research instruments were translations of the original Dutch CDS. Psychometric evaluations of the CDS were carried out for each country separately as well as for the four countries combined. High alpha coefficients between 0.94 and 0.97 were calculated. Subsequent test-retest and inter-rater reliability revealed moderate to substantial Kappa values. Factor analysis resulted in a one-factor solution. The scalability of the CDS was demonstrated by means of Mokken scale analysis. One of the main outcomes of the cross-cultural comparison was that the findings in the four countries show more similarities than differences, so that the scale can be used appropriately in nursing home practice.
PubMed ID
10759991 View in PubMed
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Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Jul;41(7):841-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Michael J Zvolensky
Willem A Arrindell
Steven Taylor
Martine Bouvard
Brian J Cox
Sherry H Stewart
Bonifacio Sandin
Samuel Jurado Cardenas
Georg H Eifert
Author Affiliation
Anxiety and Health Research Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, John Dewey Hall, Burlington, VT 05405-0134, USA. m_zvolen@dewey.uvm.edu
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Jul;41(7):841-59
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Abstract
In the present study, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Revised (ASI-R; ) was administered to a large sample of persons (n=2786) from different cultures represented in six different countries: Canada, France, Mexico, The Netherlands, Spain, and the United States. We sought to (a) determine the factor structure and internal consistency of the ASI-R and (b) examine the correlations of the measure with psychiatric symptoms and personality dimensions in a single European non-English speaking country (The Netherlands). Partially consistent with the original hypothesis, the underlying structure of the anxiety sensitivity construct was generally similar across countries, tapping fear about the negative consequences of anxiety-related physical and social-cognitive sensations. Lower-order factors were moderately to strongly correlated with one another and showed good internal consistency. The observed lower-order ASI-R factors correlated with established psychiatric symptoms and with the personality trait of neuroticism. Partial correlations indicated that both factors are useful in accounting for variance in symptom measures. We discuss the results of this investigation in relation to the cross-cultural assessment of the anxiety sensitivity construct.
PubMed ID
12781249 View in PubMed
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[A screening test for depression in general practice. The COOP/WONCA chart]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46289
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 8;161(6):787-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-8-1999
Author
J K Pedersen
N. Damsbo
J. Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitet, Forskningsenheden og Fagomradet for Almen Medicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 8;161(6):787-90
Date
Feb-8-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emotions
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Predictive value of tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Registries
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Depressed patients in general practice may be difficult to identify. Questionnaires may be used for screening but some of the existing instruments are difficult to use and have only to a limited degree been introduced in general practice. In this study 798 patients' answers to the COOP/WONCA chart "Feelings" were compared to GPs' diagnosis according to ICD-10 criteria for depressive single episode (F32). At cut-off2/3 (slight/moderate problems) the chart had a sensitivity of 89% (76-100%) and specificity of 75% (72-78%). The predictive value of a positive test was not higher than 33% for any cut-off point and the predictive value of a negative test never less than 98%. A two-phased diagnostic strategy with the COOP/WONCA chart as step one is suggested as a possible and relatively simple way to optimize recognition of depressive patients in general practice.
PubMed ID
10028883 View in PubMed
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Assessing the ADL functioning of persons with Alzheimer's disease: comparison of family informants' ratings and performance-based assessment findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199779
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1999 Dec;11(4):399-409
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
S E Doble
J D Fisk
K. Rockwood
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Therapy, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1999 Dec;11(4):399-409
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - complications - psychology
Cognition Disorders - complications - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Nova Scotia
Observer Variation
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Sampling Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The activities of daily living (ADL) functioning of 26 subjects with Alzheimer's disease was measured using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) and family informants' Older Americans Resources and Services (OARS) Activities of Daily Living (ADL) reports. Concordance with a clinician's ratings of subjects' level of ADL functioning was achieved for 77% of the subjects based on their AMPS ADL process ability measures and for 54% for the subjects based on their family informants' OARS ADL ratings. In cases of discordance, subjects' AMPS ADL process ability measures were just as likely to overestimate (11.5%) as to underestimate (11.5%) subjects' ADL functioning. In contrast, 46% of the informants overestimated their family members' ADL functioning, and this was more likely to occur when subjects' cognitive impairment was mild.
PubMed ID
10631585 View in PubMed
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Assessment of anxiety sensitivity in young American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5551
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2001 Apr;39(4):477-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
M J Zvolensky
D W McNeil
C A Porter
S H Stewart
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, West Virginia University, Morgantown 26506-6040, USA. zvolensky@aol.com
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2001 Apr;39(4):477-93
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Anxiety - diagnosis - ethnology
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Kansas
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
In the present study, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index [ASI; Behav. Res. Ther. 24 (1986) 1] was administered to 282 American Indian and Alaska Native college students in a preliminary effort to: (a) evaluate the factor structure and internal consistency of the ASI in a sample of Native Americans; (b) examine whether this group would report greater levels of anxiety sensitivity and gender and age-matched college students from the majority (Caucasian) culture lesser such levels; and (c) explore whether gender differences in anxiety sensitivity dimensions varied by cultural group (Native American vs. Caucasian). Consistent with existing research, results of this investigation indicated that, among Native peoples, the ASI and its subscales had high levels of internal consistency, and a factor structure consisting of three lower-order factors (i.e. Physical, Psychological, and Social Concerns) that all loaded on a single higher-order (global Anxiety Sensitivity) factor. We also found that these Native American college students reported significantly greater overall ASI scores as well as greater levels of Psychological and Social Concerns relative to counterparts from the majority (Caucasian) culture. There were no significant differences detected for ASI physical threat concerns. In regard to gender, we found significant differences between males and females in terms of total and Physical Threat ASI scores, with females reporting greater levels, and males lesser levels, of overall anxiety sensitivity and greater fear of physical sensations; no significant differences emerged between genders for the ASI Psychological and Social Concerns dimensions. These gender differences did not vary by cultural group, indicating they were evident among Caucasian and Native Americans alike. We discuss the results of this investigation in relation to the assessment of anxiety sensitivity in American Indians and Alaska Natives, and offer directions for future research with the ASI in Native peoples.
PubMed ID
11280345 View in PubMed
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Association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity and ego structure of the Nanai people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290351
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2017 Jul 10; 22(1):59
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jul-10-2017
Author
Yoko Ota
Natalia Korshunova
Masashi Demura
Midori Katsuyama
Hironobu Katsuyama
Sri Ratna Rahayu
Kiyofumi Saijoh
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan.
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2017 Jul 10; 22(1):59
Date
Jul-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Chemical Hazard Release - psychology
Disasters
Ego
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Principal Component Analysis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Sexuality - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
A man-made chemical disaster occurred in the Amur River, leading to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the Nanai people indigenous to the river's surrounding area. PTSD severity measured by the total scores of Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) (Total-I) and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) (Total-C) were not always identical in terms of demographic and ethnocultural characters. It is possible that the results derived using the Total-I and Total-C may differ for persons with different backgrounds and/or individual characteristics. In this study, the associations between PTSD severity and personal characteristics were evaluated.
The study was a field-type survey including 187 randomly selected participants (75 males and 112 females). In addition to Total-I/Total-C, scores for each IES-R/CAPS item, Intrusion, Avoidance, and Hyperarousal, and Ego Structure Test by Ammon (ISTA) score were examined to evaluate their personal characteristics.
No specific trends in ISTA score were obvious among four groups defined according to Total-I/Total-C. The results of principal component analysis showed that all IES-R/CAPS items contributed positively to the 1st axis but to the 2nd axis in a different manner. ISTA items did not always show correlations to each other, but principal component analysis suggested that Construct contributed positively and Destruct and Deficient (with the exception of Destruct sexuality) contributed negatively. High IES-R scores were associated with Construct Aggression and Deficient Inner demarcation, but high CAPS score was less likely to exhibit Construct Narcissism.
To avoid the misdiagnosis of PTSD, usage of both IES-R/CAPS may be required. Simultaneous application of personality/ego tests may be helpful, but appropriate numbers of their questions would be important.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29165146 View in PubMed
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The Beck Depression Inventory and General Health Questionnaire as measures of depression in the general population: a validation study using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview as the gold standard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126700
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2012 May 15;197(1-2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2012
Author
Anna-Mari Aalto
Marko Elovainio
Mika Kivimäki
Antti Uutela
Sami Pirkola
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. anna-mari.aalto@thl.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2012 May 15;197(1-2):163-71
Date
May-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Community Health Planning
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Questionnaires - standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Self Report
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) are commonly used in population studies as measures of depression. We examined in a population sample the validity of four scales for depressive symptoms, the GHQ-12, the 21- and 13-item versions of the BDI, and a new 6-item version of the BDI developed for this study. A total of 5561 participants in the "Health 2000" survey (30-79 years) completed the four scales and were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), which was used as the validation criterion. We selected items for the BDI-6 through an exploratory factor analysis for the BDI-21. The accuracy of the scales, including the BDI-6, was satisfactory (c-statistics 0.88-0.92 for depression within the past 2 weeks and 0.80-0.83 within the past 12 months) and slightly better for men (0.92-0.96 and 0.85-0.87) than for women (0.86-0.88 and 0.78-0.79). Higher scores in all the scales were associated with more severe depression and more recent depressive episodes. This study suggests that various versions of the BDI and the GHQ-12 are useful in detecting depressive disorders in the general population. Even the 6-item version of the BDI showed acceptable criterion validity, although replication in an independent dataset is needed to confirm its validity.
PubMed ID
22365275 View in PubMed
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92 records – page 1 of 10.