Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1786 records – page 1 of 179.

The 2-year course following detoxification treatment of substance abuse: the possible influence of psychiatric comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11106
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tómasson
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Landspítalinn, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the course and outcome in a nationwide representative sample (n = 351) of treatment-seeking substance users over a 28-month period was studied prospectively. The patients were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and a questionnaire on drinking history. At 16 and 28 months after admission the patients returned a questionnaire on drinking history and mental health. In cases of those lacking information on either follow-up (45%), details on drinking status was obtained from informants. Completely abstinent were 16%. Generalized anxiety disorder and/or social phobia at the index admission predicted abstinence during the follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.25], whereas onset of alcoholism among these patients after age 25 years predicted a worse prognosis (OR = 13.5). Also increasing number of social consequences related to abuse (OR = 1.3) and drinking more than the median (OR = 2.1) predicted a poor outcome. The abstinent group had significantly better mental health at follow-up. The patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders at admission were worse at follow-up. Although substance use disorders and comorbid psychiatric disorders have to a certain degree separate courses, there is nevertheless significant interaction between them. Early treatment and recognition of comorbid psychiatric disorders among substance abusers is necessary.
PubMed ID
9477012 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 4-fold risk of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49604
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Kaisa M Saari
Sari M Lindeman
Kaisa M Viilo
Matti K Isohanni
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Liisa H Laurén
Markku J Savolainen
Hannu J Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. kaisa.saari@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diet Therapy
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with a shortened life expectancy and increased somatic comorbidity with, e.g., cardiovascular disorders. One major risk factor for these disorders is the metabolic syndrome, which has been reported to have a higher frequency in schizophrenic patients. Our objective was to study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a population-based birth cohort. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 5613 members of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort who participated in the field study from 1997 to 1998. Subjects were divided into 4 diagnostic categories (DSM-III-R): (1) schizophrenia (N = 31), (2) other functional psychoses (N = 22), (3) nonpsychotic disorders (N = 105), and (4) no psychiatric hospital treatment (N = 5455, comparison group). Subjects were assessed for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program. RESULTS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in subjects with schizophrenia compared with the comparison group (19% vs. 6%, p = .010). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with other psychoses was 5%. After controlling for sex, the results of logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.5 to 9.0). CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia even at such a relatively young age underscores the need to select antipsychotic medications with no or little capability to induce metabolic side effects. Also, developing comprehensive efforts directed at controlling weight and diet and improving physical activity are needed.
PubMed ID
15889940 View in PubMed
Less detail

5HTR2A gene polymorphism and personality traits in patients with major psychoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190821
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
V E Golimbet
M V Alfimova
K K Manandyan
N G Mitushina
L I Abramova
V G Kaleda
I V Oleichik
YuB Yurov
V I Trubnikov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Preventive Genetics, Research Mental Health Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Zagorodnoe sh. 2/2, Moscow, Russia 113152. golimbet@mail.ru
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow
Personality - genetics
Personality Inventory
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - genetics
Receptors, Serotonin - genetics
Abstract
Serotonin receptor (5HTR2A) gene polymorphism has been reported to be associated with clinical phenotypes in schizophrenia. The current study attempted to investigate a relationship between 5HTR2A 102T/C polymorphism and personality traits as well as clinical symptoms in patients with ICD-10 diagnoses of schizophrenia and affective disorders. 5HTR2A genotyping, clinical and psychological assessment were administered to 375 patients, 104 first-degree healthy relatives of the patients and 157 controls. In the patients an association was observed between the 2/2 5HTR2A genotype and scores on the Hypochondriasis scale (MMPI) (ANOVA, F = 4.56; P = 0.011) and trait anxiety (F = 4.21; P = 0.002). A significant difference between 1/1 and 2/2 genotypes has been also found for Neuroticism scores (EPI) (t = 2.18; P = 0.0031). No significant differences by 5HTR2A genotype were observed in either the control or first-degree relatives group for all scales studied. Positive, negative and psychopathological symptoms emerged higher in the 2/2 genotype patients compared to other genotype carriers. Therefore, the 2/2 genotype may contribute to produce the phenotype, with specific clinical and pathological features in common, regardless of nosologic heterogeneity of psychoses.
PubMed ID
11918989 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300956
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilse A C Arnoldussen
Valter Sundh
Kristoffer Bäckman
Silke Kern
Svante Östling
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Ingmar Skoog
Amanda J Kiliaan
Deborah R Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Dementia - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Fasting
Female
Humans
Independent living
Leptin - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Adiposity measured in mid- or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.
We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.
924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.
Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (
PubMed ID
29758945 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year follow-up study of an adolescent psychiatric clientele and early predictors of readmission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31747
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):11-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Pedersen
T. Aarkrog
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Centralsygehuset i Holbaek, Gl. Ringstedvej 1, DK-4300 Holbaek, Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):11-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia, Childhood - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Utilization Review
Abstract
Over a period of 20 years (from 1968 to 1988) all inpatients (n = 839) who were admitted for the first time to the adolescent psychiatric unit in Copenhagen were registered, and 40 social and psychiatric variables were recorded, to investigate early predictors of later readmission. Overall, 44.8% of the patients were readmitted within a certain observation period (range, 1.5-21.5 years). Among a subsample of 488 patients (58%) who could be followed up for more than 10 years after their first admission 26% became heavy users of psychiatric services, defined as long-term inpatients or revolving-door patients. Severe early diagnoses (schizophrenia and affective psychoses) were strongly associated with rapid relapses and frequent readmissions. A statistical estimate of the risk of later heavy use based on 12 independent variables is presented.
PubMed ID
11827601 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 12-month prevalence and characteristics of major depressive episode in a representative nationwide sample of adolescents and young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192702
Source
Psychol Med. 2001 Oct;31(7):1169-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
L. Haarasilta
M. Marttunen
J. Kaprio
H. Aro
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Psychol Med. 2001 Oct;31(7):1169-79
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Time Factors
Abstract
This study set out to estimate the 12-month prevalence of DSM-III-R major depressive episode (MDE) and to analyse factors associating with psychosocial impairment, episode duration, phenomenology and symptom severity in a representative general population sample of adolescents (15-19-year-olds) and young adults (20-24-year-olds).
The Finnish Health Care Survey '96 (FINHCS '96) was a cross-sectional nationwide epidemiological study. A random sample of 509 adolescents and 433 young adults was interviewed in 1996. MDE was assessed by University of Michigan Composite Diagnostic Interview Short-Form.
The 12-month prevalence of MDE was 5.3 % for adolescents (females 6.0%, males 4.4%) and 9.4% for young adults (females 10.7%, males 8.1%). When moderate psychosocial impairment was included in case definition, the prevalences were lowered by 20-25%. Increased impairment was associated with drunkenness at least twice a month, a higher mean number of depressive symptoms and impaired concentration. The median episode duration was 1 month. No factors associating with duration were found. With the exception of symptoms related to appetite being more common among females than males, the phenomenology of MDE was mainly independent of age and gender.
Episodes of major depression among adolescents and young adults in the general population are short but often associated with psychosocial impairment, especially if frequent drunkenness coexists.
PubMed ID
11681543 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 12-year Trend of Psychological Distress: National Study of Finnish University Students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285639
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Airi Oksanen
Katri Laimi
Katja Björklund
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kristina Kunttu
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
The study aimed to explore changes in the prevalence of psychological distress and co-occurring psychological symptoms among 19-34 years old Finnish university students between the years 2000 and 2012.
The prevalence of perceived frequent psychological symptoms was compared in four nationwide cross-sectional student health surveys with random samples (N=11,502) in the following years: 2000 (N=3,174), 2004 (N=3,153), 2008 (N=2,750), and 2012 (N=2,425).
In the time phase from 2000 to 2012, the overall psychological distress (12-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12) increased from 22% to 28%, while there was also an increase in the frequently experienced psychological symptoms (depressiveness from 13% to 15%, anxiety from 8% to 13%, concentration problems from 12% to 18%, and psychological tension from 13% to 18% with a peak prevalence observed in 2008). The co-occurrence of different psychological symptoms increased as well. Psychological distress was more common in females and in older students.
The findings suggest an increasing trend of frequent psychological distress among Finnish university students over the years from 2000 to 2012, with the peak prevalence occurring in 2008, which may reflect the growing multifaceted environmental demands.
PubMed ID
28662321 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 40-year perspective on the prevalence of depression: the Stirling County Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199227
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):209-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J M Murphy
N M Laird
R R Monson
A M Sobol
A H Leighton
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129-2000, USA. murphy@a1.mgh.harvard.edu
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):209-15
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
According to epidemiologic studies that use recall of lifetime episodes, the prevalence of depression is increasing. This report from the Stirling County Study compares rates of current depression among representative samples of adults from a population in Atlantic Canada.
Sample sizes were 1003, 1201, and 1396 in 1952, 1970, and 1992, respectively. The depression component of the study's method, the DPAX (DP for depression and AX for anxiety), was employed. The original procedure (DPAX-1) was applied in all years. A revision (DPAX-2) was used in 1970 and 1992. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) was also used in 1992.
With the DPAX-1, the overall prevalence of current depression was steady at 5% over the 2 early samples but declined in 1992 because of vernacular changes referring to dysphoria. The DPAX-2 gave a stable overall prevalence of 5% in the 2 recent samples, but indicated that women and younger people were at greater risk in 1992 than in 1970. The DIS, like the DPAX-2, found a current 1992 rate of 5% for major depressive episodes combined with dysthymia. Recalled lifetime rates using the DIS showed the same profile interpreted in other studies as suggesting an increase in depression over time.
Three samples over a 40-year period showed a stable current prevalence of depression using the DPAX methods that was comparable in 1992 with the current rates using the DIS. This casts doubt on the interpretation that depression is generally increasing. Within the overall steady rate observed in this study, historical change was a matter of redistribution by sex and age, with a higher rate among younger women being of recent origin.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):223-410711907
Comment In: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):227-810711908
PubMed ID
10711905 View in PubMed
Less detail

100 years after Alzheimer: contemporary neurology practice assessment of referrals for dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153508
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):516-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tiffany W Chow
Carin Binder
Steven Smyth
Sharon Cohen
Alain Robillard
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):516-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Neurology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The prevalence of dementia is placing an increased burden on specialists.
Canadian neurologists responded to a structured questionnaire to assess reasons for referral and services provided as well as to compare the neurologists' perceptions of their practice characteristics against cases seen over a 3-month period.
The audit confirmed the participants' perception that family practitioners are the main referral source (358/453, 79%). Sixty-two percent of patients had undergone clinical investigation for dementia prior to being seen by the neurologist; 39% (177/453) were on pharmacotherapy at the time of referral, 68% were initiated on pharmacotherapy by the neurologist. A fifth of the referrals did not meet clinical criteria for dementia, which may be directly related to the prevalence of prior workup that did not include mental status testing.
Neurologists currently treat patients referred for dementia who may already have been adequately evaluated and treated by primary care providers.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):513-519222144
PubMed ID
19106275 View in PubMed
Less detail

1786 records – page 1 of 179.