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Adolescents with anorexia nervosa: multiple perspectives of discharge readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173064
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri L Turrell
Ron Davis
Heather Graham
Iris Weiss
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sturrell@nygh.on.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Aftercare
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
Little is known about the conditions that must be in place to help adolescent patients and their families gain the confidence needed to continue recovery at home, following the adolescents' hospitalization for anorexia nervosa.
Beliefs about discharge readiness were obtained through an open-ended questionnaire following the patients' first weekend pass home from an in-patient unit. The perceptions of patients, parents, and registered nurses were obtained using parallel versions of a questionnaire.
An examination of the responses revealed four themes; medical stability, education, psychological changes, and community resource planning, that were common to all respondents, as well as themes specific to adolescents and to nurses.
The findings suggest that each group of respondents has unique discharge readiness needs and that registered nurses have an important role to play in helping patients and families make the transition home as successful as possible. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.
PubMed ID
16137269 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canada's programs to prevent mental health problems in children: the research-practice gap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177737
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1069-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2004
Author
John D McLennan
Harriet L MacMillan
Ellen Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1069-71
Date
Oct-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - therapy
Mental health
Preventive Medicine - organization & administration
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Research
Notes
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;40(7 Suppl):24S-51S11434483
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jul 28;323(7306):194-811473908
Cites: Prev Sci. 2001 Mar;2(1):1-1311519371
Cites: Prev Sci. 2001 Dec;2(4):209-2711833925
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Sep;110(3):486-9612205249
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2002 Oct;29(5):620-3912238705
Cites: Prev Sci. 2002 Dec;3(4):257-6512458764
Cites: Future Child. 1999 Spring-Summer;9(1):152-7810414015
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Aug 27;278(8):644-529272896
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Aug 27;278(8):637-439272895
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 12;273(14):1106-127707598
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1990 Aug;58(4):437-462212181
Cites: Pediatrics. 1982 Dec;70(6):883-947145543
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jun;94(6):1027-915249310
Cites: Am Psychol. 1999 Sep;54(9):755-6410510665
PubMed ID
15505271 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and staff resources of child and adolescent psychiatric hospital wards in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175590
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Apr;12(2):209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
H. Ellilä
A. Sourander
M. Välimäki
J. Piha
Author Affiliation
Turku Polytechnic, Social and Health Care, Finland. heikki.ellila@turkuamk.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Apr;12(2):209-14
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Adolescent Psychiatry - organization & administration
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child Psychiatry - organization & administration
Finland
Guidelines as Topic
Health Resources - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Psychology, Clinical - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Social Work, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Workload
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe structural characteristics and staff resources of child psychiatric and adolescent psychiatric hospital wards in Finland. The target group of the survey consisted of 69 child and adolescent psychiatric hospital units in Finland. Information was obtained from 64 units (93%). Most of the wards were based on 24-h-a-day provision. There were only 7-day-treatment programmes including two family wards. When compared internationally, the numbers of units, beds and staff levels were high in Finland, with all members of staff qualified. The nurse-patient ratio and psychiatrist resources were rather satisfactory. However, in many units there was a lack of psychologists, social workers and occupational therapists. General recommendations and guidelines for staff resources in child and adolescent hospital treatment wards are warranted.
PubMed ID
15788039 View in PubMed
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Clinical supervision, burnout, and job satisfaction among mental health and psychiatric nurses in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70639
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Jun;26(5):531-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Kristiina Hyrkäs
Author Affiliation
University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada. hyrkask@unbc.ca
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Jun;26(5):531-56
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Clinical Competence
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Occupational Health
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Population Surveillance
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Support
Time Factors
Workload
Abstract
This paper presents the findings from a survey of Finnish mental health and psychiatric nurses. The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate the current state of clinical supervision, and ascertain the levels of burnout and job satisfaction experienced by these health care professionals. Clinical supervision was found beneficial for mental health and psychiatric health care professionals in terms of their job satisfaction and levels of stress. The findings seem to demonstrate that efficient clinical supervision is related to lower burnout, and inefficient supervision to increasing job dissatisfaction.
PubMed ID
16020067 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing the effect of non-medical mechanical restraint preventive factors between psychiatric units in Denmark and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269120
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 Aug;69(6):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Jesper Bak
Vibeke Zoffmann
Dorte Maria Sestoft
Roger Almvik
Volkert Dirk Siersma
Mette Brandt-Christensen
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 Aug;69(6):433-43
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dangerous Behavior
Denmark
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Restraint, Physical - psychology - utilization
Social Environment
Utilization Review
Young Adult
Abstract
The use of mechanical restraint (MR) is controversial, and large differences regarding the use of MR are often found among countries. In an earlier study, we observed that MR was used twice as frequently in Denmark than Norway.
To examine how presumed MR preventive factors of non-medical origin may explain the differing number of MR episodes between Denmark and Norway.
This study is a cross-sectional survey of psychiatric units. Linear regression was used to assess the confounding effects of the MR preventive factors, i.e. whether a difference in the impact of these factors is evident between Denmark and Norway.
Six MR preventive factors confounded [?exp(B)> 10%] the difference in MR use between Denmark and Norway, including staff education (- 51%), substitute staff (- 17%), acceptable work environment (- 15%), separation of acutely disturbed patients (13%), patient-staff ratio (- 11%), and the identification of the patient's crisis triggers (- 10%).
These six MR preventive factors might partially explain the difference in the frequency of MR episodes observed in the two countries, i.e. higher numbers in Denmark than Norway. One MR preventive factor was not supported by earlier research, the identification of the patient's crisis triggers; therefore, more research on the mechanisms involved is needed.
None of the six MR preventive factors presents any adverse effects; therefore, units in Denmark and Norway may consider investigating the effect of implementing, the identification of the patient's crisis triggers, an increased number of staff per patient, increased staff education, a better work environment and reduced use of substitute staff in practice.
PubMed ID
25614990 View in PubMed
Less detail

Conceptions of patients and personnel concerning the substance of post-ward outpatient visits in psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170995
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2006 Feb;13(1):61-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
P-L Hautala-Jylhä
M. Nikkonen
J. Jylhä
Author Affiliation
Central Ostrobothnia Health Care District, Kokkola, Finland.
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2006 Feb;13(1):61-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aftercare - organization & administration - psychology
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Deinstitutionalization
Drug Monitoring
Finland
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Process
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Social Isolation
Abstract
In post-ward outpatient services patients discharged from hospital are provided further care by the same ward personnel. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the conceptions concerning the substance of post-ward outpatient visits (PWOV). A phenomenographic approach was used. The data were gathered by interviewing post-ward outpatients, personnel at psychiatric wards and in outpatient care and administrative personnel in psychiatric units. Seven main categories of describing the PWOV were formed: natural interaction, continuous assessment, follow-up of the implementation of pharmacotherapy, relapse prevention, search for coping methods, establishing motivation for treatment and family members' participation in care. The patient's health, life situation and coping in everyday life were constantly evaluated and followed up in diverse ways during the PWOV. To make PWOV successful, treatment should be planned individually based on the patient's needs, and the patient should have a close and functional cooperative relationship with the nurse.
PubMed ID
16441395 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 May 10;78(8):13-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1990

63 records – page 1 of 7.