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638 records – page 1 of 64.

[2d Report from Sandnes: psychiatric home nursing a gain for primary health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246570
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Dec 5;66(19):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-1979
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Dec 5;66(19):12-5
Date
Dec-5-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services
Home Care Services
Humans
Norway
Primary Health Care
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
260372 View in PubMed
Less detail

[2 Finnish psychiatric nurses in Switzerland. "I am missing here the personal supervision". Interview by Kaarina Karlstedt].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228089
Source
Krankenpfl Soins Infirm. 1990 Nov;83(11):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
K. Koivulahti
M. Pietinhuhta
Source
Krankenpfl Soins Infirm. 1990 Nov;83(11):30-1
Date
Nov-1990
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - ethnology
Humans
Psychiatric Nursing
Switzerland
PubMed ID
2250453 View in PubMed
Less detail

[100 years of Swedish neurology--milestone and future prospects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233336
Source
Lakartidningen. 1988 Mar 9;85(10):860-2, 864
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-9-1988
Source
Can J Psychiatr Nurs. 1979 Mar-Apr;20(2):5-7
Publication Type
Article
Source
Can J Psychiatr Nurs. 1979 Mar-Apr;20(2):5-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Advocacy
Humans
Mental health services
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
255348 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1990s: a time for change and opportunity in Finnish mental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191014
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2002 Feb;9(1):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Maritta Välimäki
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2002 Feb;9(1):1-3
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental health services
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
11896850 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accommodation and resistance to the dominant cultural discourse on psychiatric mental health: oral history accounts of family members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160232
Source
Nurs Inq. 2007 Dec;14(4):266-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Geertje Boschma
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. geertje.boschma@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2007 Dec;14(4):266-78
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude to Health
Autobiography as Topic
Cultural Characteristics
Family
Historiography
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mental Disorders - history
Mental Health Services - history
Narration - history
Nursing Methodology Research
Psychiatric Nursing - history
Questionnaires
Abstract
Oral history makes a critical contribution in articulating the perspectives of people often overlooked in histories written from the standpoint of dominating class, gender, ethnic or professional groups. Using three interrelated approaches - life stories, oral history, and narrative analysis - this paper analyzes family responses to psychiatric care and mental illness in oral history interviews with family members who experienced mental illness themselves or within their family between 1930 and 1975. Interviews with three family members in Alberta, Canada are the primary focus. These stories provide an important avenue to understand the meaning and transformations of mental health-care from the point of view of families. Family members' stories reveal contradictory responses to the dominant cultural discourse. Using a performative framework of interpretation, the narratives reveal a complex interplay between medical, social and cultural conceptions of mental illness, deepening our understanding of its meaning. The history of mental health-care can be substantially enriched by the analysis of family members' stories, not only revealing the constructed nature of mental illness, but also illustrating the family as a mediating context in which the meaning of mental illness is negotiated.
PubMed ID
18028147 View in PubMed
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Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136673
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Salzmann-Erikson
Kim L Tz N
Ann-Britt Ivarsson
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dalarna University School of Health and Sciences, Falun, Sweden; Orebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Nursing Research
Crisis Intervention
Culture
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interview, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing, Team
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - nursing
Research Design
Security Measures
Social Environment
Social Values
Sweden
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.
PubMed ID
21355761 View in PubMed
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[A constructive approach to individuals in conflict with society. Assistance to hospitalized prisoners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249792
Source
Infirm Can. 1977 Jul;19(7):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1977

[Activities as a psychiatric district nurse: findings support belief in the value of psychiatric district nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247588
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Jan 10;79(2):4-7, 23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1979
Author
B. Jensen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Jan 10;79(2):4-7, 23
Date
Jan-10-1979
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Community Mental Health Services
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Humans
Patient care team
Psychiatric Nursing
PubMed ID
253473 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents with anorexia nervosa: multiple perspectives of discharge readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173064
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri L Turrell
Ron Davis
Heather Graham
Iris Weiss
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sturrell@nygh.on.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Aftercare
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
Little is known about the conditions that must be in place to help adolescent patients and their families gain the confidence needed to continue recovery at home, following the adolescents' hospitalization for anorexia nervosa.
Beliefs about discharge readiness were obtained through an open-ended questionnaire following the patients' first weekend pass home from an in-patient unit. The perceptions of patients, parents, and registered nurses were obtained using parallel versions of a questionnaire.
An examination of the responses revealed four themes; medical stability, education, psychological changes, and community resource planning, that were common to all respondents, as well as themes specific to adolescents and to nurses.
The findings suggest that each group of respondents has unique discharge readiness needs and that registered nurses have an important role to play in helping patients and families make the transition home as successful as possible. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.
PubMed ID
16137269 View in PubMed
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638 records – page 1 of 64.