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55 records – page 1 of 6.

Association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285157
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2016 Sep;175(3):487-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
A. Egeberg
L. Mallbris
R B Warren
H. Bachelez
G H Gislason
P R Hansen
L. Skov
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2016 Sep;175(3):487-92
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Colitis, Ulcerative - complications - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - complications - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Psoriasis - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Psoriasis, Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping genetic architecture. However, data on the frequency and risk of CD and UC in psoriasis are scarce and poorly understood.
To investigate the association between CD and UC in patients with psoriasis.
All Danish individuals aged = 18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked in nationwide registers. Psoriasis severity was defined in two models: hospital visits and medication. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression.
In the total cohort (n = 5 554 100) there were 75 209 incident cases of psoriasis, 11 309 incident cases of CD and 30 310 incident cases of UC, during follow-up. The adjusted IRRs (95% confidence intervals) of CD were 1·28 (1·03-1·59), 2·56 (1·87-3·50), 2·85 (1·72-4·73) and 3·42 (2·36-4·95) in patients with mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis (hospital), severe psoriasis (medication) and psoriatic arthritis, respectively. Similarly, the adjusted IRRs of UC were 1·49 (1·32-1·68), 1·56 (1·22-2·00), 1·96 (1·36-2·83) and 2·43 (1·86-3·17), respectively. The 10-year incidence of CD was 2-5 per 1000 patients and of UC 7-11 per 1000 patients, depending on psoriasis severity and the presence of psoriatic arthritis. Additionally, an increased risk of incident psoriasis was found following CD or UC.
We observed a psoriasis-associated increased risk of CD and UC, which was higher in severe psoriasis, and an increased risk of psoriasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Increased focus on gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with psoriasis may be warranted.
PubMed ID
26959083 View in PubMed
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Association of Psoriatic Disease With Uveitis: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270433
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2015 Nov;151(11):1200-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Alexander Egeberg
Usman Khalid
Gunnar Hilmar Gislason
Lotus Mallbris
Lone Skov
Peter Riis Hansen
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2015 Nov;151(11):1200-5
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Psoriatic - complications - pathology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Psoriasis - complications - pathology
Risk
Severity of Illness Index
Uveitis - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and uveitis are inflammatory disorders with significant overlap in their inflammatory pathways. Limited evidence is available about the relationship between psoriatic disease and uveitis.
To investigate the potential bidirectional relationship between psoriatic disease, including psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and uveitis.
We performed a nationwide cohort study of the Danish population from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2011. We included 74,129 Danish patients with psoriasis who were 18 years or older during the study period. Patients were identified through administrative registries, and information on age, sex, socioeconomic status, medication, and comorbidity was obtained using individual-level linkage of administrative registers. We performed data analysis from January 27 through March 4, 2015.
Diagnosis of mild or severe psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis for uveitis risk and diagnosis of uveitis for the risk for psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.
Diagnosis of uveitis, mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, or psoriatic arthritis. We calculated incidence rates (IRs) and estimated IR ratios adjusted for potential confounders using Poisson regression.
We identified 74,129 cases of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and 13,114 cases of uveitis. The IRs (95% CIs) for uveitis were 2.02 (1.99-2.06), 2.88 (2.33-3.56), 4.23 (2.40-7.45), and 5.49 (3.36-8.96) for the reference population and those with mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, respectively. In the reference population, these IRs (95% CIs) were 9.37 (9.30-9.45), 1.12 (1.10-1.15), and 1.04 (1.01-1.06), and in patients with uveitis, these statistics were 15.51 (12.92-18.62), 2.66 (1.72-4.13), and 4.25 (3.00-6.01) for mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, respectively. Adjusted IR ratios (95% CIs) for uveitis were 1.38 (1.11-1.70 [P?=?.02]), 1.40 (0.70-2.81 [P?=?.34]), and 2.50 (1.53-4.08 [P?
PubMed ID
26222707 View in PubMed
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The bodily suffering of living with severe psoriasis: in-depth interviews with 22 hospitalized patients with psoriasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71757
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Feb;12(2):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Astrid Klopstad Wahl
Eva Gjengedal
Berit Rokne Hanestad
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health at Buskerud College, Norway.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Feb;12(2):250-61
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Chronic Disease - psychology
Cost of Illness
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain - etiology - psychology
Psoriasis - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Quality of Life
Self Concept
Social Isolation
Stereotyping
Abstract
Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic skin diseases. The author presented results from a qualitative study focusing on patients with severe psoriasis in an acute phase and their experience of living with the disease. Twenty-two hospitalized patients with psoriasis were interviewed in depth. The interviews were consecutively analyzed according to grounded theory methodology. Bodily suffering emerged as a core variable in the data. Bodily suffering includes the following categories: the visible body, staying on an even keel, coping with an all-consuming disease, and social vulnerability. The results of this study indicate that the criterion for the management of soriasis should be the patients' own perception of the consequences of the disease.
PubMed ID
11837374 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in hospitalised psoriasis patients: a follow-up study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89389
Source
Br J Cancer. 2009 May 5;100(9):1499-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-5-2009
Author
Ji J.
Shu X.
Sundquist K.
Sundquist J.
Hemminki K.
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Sweden. Jianguang.ji@med.lu.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2009 May 5;100(9):1499-502
Date
May-5-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Psoriasis - complications
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We examined overall and specific cancer risks among Swedish subjects who had been hospitalised one or more times for psoriasis. A database was created by identifying such patients from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and linking them with the Cancer Registry. Follow-up of patients was carried out from the last hospitalisation through 2004. A total of 15 858 patients were hospitalised for psoriasis during 1965-2004, of whom 1408 developed cancer, giving an overall standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of 1.33. A significant excess was noted for squamous cell skin cancer, and for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, oesophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, lung, kidney and bladder as well as non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Many of these may reflect the effects of alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking. Patients with multiple hospitalisations showed high risk, particularly for oesophageal (SIR 6.97) and skin (SIR 4.76) cancers.
PubMed ID
19352386 View in PubMed
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Cell-mediated immunity in psoriatic arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245988
Source
J Rheumatol. 1980 Mar-Apr;7(2):218-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
L R Espinoza
S W Gaylord
F B Vasey
C K Osterland
Source
J Rheumatol. 1980 Mar-Apr;7(2):218-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis - complications - immunology - pathology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - immunology - pathology
Canada
Cell Separation
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Longitudinal Studies
Lymphocyte Activation
Psoriasis - complications - immunology
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
Mitogen response of peripheral blood lymphocytes with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), conconavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and purified protein derivative (PPD) was studied in 32 patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Results were compared with those obtained from a control group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and another group of normal subjects. The PHA, Con A, and PWM responses were depressed in the PsA group. The degree of depression of the mitogen response was comparable to that observed in the group of patients with active RA. Sequential studies done in a small group of PsA patients revealed that the mitogen response paralleled disease activity. Improvement of disease activity was followed by increased mitogen response.
PubMed ID
6966333 View in PubMed
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Collecting a set of psoriasis family material through a patient organisation; clinical characterisation and presence of additional disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29404
Source
BMC Dermatol. 2005;5:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Annica Inerot
Charlotta Enerbäck
Fredrik Enlund
Tommy Martinsson
Lena Samuelsson
Jan Wahlström
Gunnar Swanbeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. annica.inerot@derm.gu.se
Source
BMC Dermatol. 2005;5:10
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Family
Female
HLA-C Antigens - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psoriasis - complications - diagnosis - genetics
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Twins
Voluntary Health Agencies
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to describe the clinical characteristics of a population of psoriatics sampled from a patient organisation and not from hospitals or out-patient clinics. Furthermore, we wanted to compare siblings with and without psoriasis regarding the occurrence of other diseases. METHODS: At the end of 1991, we initiated a project which aimed to study genetic factors leading to psoriasis. Firstly, we sent questionnaires to all the members of the Swedish Psoriasis Association. We then examined 1,217 individuals (570 with psoriasis) from 310 families, in their homes in the southern part of Sweden. All the available family members were examined clinically and asked about the course of the skin disease and the occurrence of other diseases. The eight hundred members of the proband generation were divided into two groups, with or without psoriasis, and their clinical features were compared. RESULTS: Most individuals in this study population had a mild form of psoriasis. The siblings with psoriasis had joint complaints significantly more frequently than their siblings without the skin disease and those with joint complaints had more widespread skin disease. Among the other studied concomitant diseases (iritis, heart or hypertension disease, endocrine disease, inflammatory bowel disease and neurological disease), we were not able to find any difference. Seventy-seven of 570 persons were found to be in remission (13.5%). Females had a mean onset 2.5 years earlier than males. We were not able to find any correlation between the extent of the skin disease and age at onset. Twice as many persons with joint complaints were found among those with psoriasis than among those without, 28% versus 13%. Almost half (48%) the psoriatics who also had joint complaints had psoriasis lesions on their nails. Endocrine disorders were found in 9% of those without any allele for Cw6, but only in 1% of those who had Cw6. In fact, none of 183 Cw6 carriers had diabetes, as compared to the population prevalence of 3-5% in Sweden. CONCLUSION: With the exception of joint complaints, persons with psoriasis, collected from a patient organisation, did not have an increased frequency of (studied) co-existing diseases.
PubMed ID
16225670 View in PubMed
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Co-morbidities in inflammatory dermatological diseases. Psoriasis, hidradenitis suppurativa, and cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273187
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Sep;62(9)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Iben M Miller
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Sep;62(9)
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Comorbidity
Denmark
Dissertations, Academic as Topic
Hidradenitis Suppurativa - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology
Psoriasis - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
In conclusion, this thesis demonstrated an association between inflammatory dermatological diseases, i.e. psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa, and the metabolic syndrome putting these two patient groups at cardiovascular risk. Therefore, it is recommended as a minimum to screen hidradenitis and psoriasis patients attending in/outpatient clinics for the metabolic syndrome aimed at prevention of cardiovascular disease. The increased risk of metabolic syndrome adds to the range of well-known disease-related burdens e.g. the physical skin symptoms, the psychological impact thereof, and other co-morbidities, thus highlighting that both hidradenitis and psoriasis patients require general medical attention beyond the skin.
PubMed ID
26324088 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.