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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Feb;102(2):26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Ann Tapp
Author Affiliation
Canadian Nurses Protective Society, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Feb;102(2):26
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Humans
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Proxy - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2006 May;102(5):8-916789559
PubMed ID
16524045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Awareness and use of advance directives in the spinal cord injured population (Spinal Cord 2002; 40: 581-594).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181642
Source
Spinal Cord. 2004 Feb;42(2):132; author reply 133
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004

Canadian critical care nurses and advance directives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202014
Source
Off J Can Assoc Crit Care Nurs. 1998;9(1):6-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
B. Leith
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Off J Can Assoc Crit Care Nurs. 1998;9(1):6-11
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advance Directives - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Critical Care
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Proxy - legislation & jurisprudence
Questionnaires
Abstract
This article describes the findings from a survey which was conducted during the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses (CACCN) September 1997 national conference. The survey was intended to identify Canadian critical care nurses' experience, knowledge, and opinions of advance directives. Major findings included that 80% of those surveyed had cared for at least one patient who had an advance directive, 89% were in favour of advance directives, 54% were familiar with their provincial legislation relating to advance directives, and 34% could correctly differentiate between an instructional and a proxy directive. The findings from this study suggest that while the majority of respondent Canadian critical care nurses have had some experience with advance directives, most require further education in order to use advance directives effectively in their daily practice.
PubMed ID
10347494 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of reports by relatives and staff on living conditions of adults with intellectual disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169306
Source
Ment Retard. 2006 Apr;44(2):120-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Oie Umb-Carlsson
Karin Sonnander
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, SE-750 17 Uppsala, Sweden. oie.umb-c@swipnet.se
Source
Ment Retard. 2006 Apr;44(2):120-7
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adult
Aged
Disability Evaluation
Female
Group Homes - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Mentally Disabled Persons - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Proxy - legislation & jurisprudence
Reproducibility of Results
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Proxies typically serve as information providers in studies of persons with intellectual disabilities. However, little is known about the concordance between different proxy categories and how proxy characteristics influence the information provided. We compared 89 pairs of relative and staff reports on the living conditions of persons with intellectual disabilities, using percentage agreement and Cohen's kappa statistics. Results demonstrate differences between relative and staff reports for most of the domains investigated, with moderate agreement for objective items and fair agreement for subjective items. Relative and staff proxies contributed different information related to diverse viewpoints and varying types of information. Thus, we suggest that information provided by proxies should not be treated as being interchangeable but, rather, as complementary.
PubMed ID
16689612 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.