Skip header and navigation

Refine By

32 records – page 1 of 4.

Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Risk of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285840
Source
Gastroenterology. 2017 Sep;153(3):702-710
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Derk C F Klatte
Alessandro Gasparini
Hong Xu
Pietro de Deco
Marco Trevisan
Anna L V Johansson
Björn Wettermark
Johan Ärnlöv
Cynthia J Janmaat
Bengt Lindholm
Friedo W Dekker
Josef Coresh
Morgan E Grams
Juan J Carrero
Source
Gastroenterology. 2017 Sep;153(3):702-710
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Creatinine - blood
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Histamine H2 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) have been associated with acute kidney injury and recent studies suggest that they may be associated with the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD).
We performed a retrospective analysis using the Stockholm creatinine measurements database, which contains information on diagnoses, dispensation claims, and laboratory test results for all citizens in the Stockholm region from 2007 through 2010. We identified new users of PPIs (n = 105,305) and new users of H2 blockers (H2B; n = 9578); data on renal outcomes were collected for a median 2.7 years. The primary outcome was progression CKD, defined as doubling of creatinine or decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate of 30% or more. Secondary outcomes were end-stage renal disease and acute kidney injury. Complete collection of repeated PPI and H2B dispensations at pharmacies in Sweden allowed modeling the time-dependent risk associated with cumulative PPI exposure.
Users of PPIs, compared with users of H2Bs, had an increased risk for doubled levels of creatinine (1985 events; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.51) and decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate of 30% or more (11,045 events; 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16-1.36). PPI use also associated with development of end-stage renal disease (HR, 2.40; 95% CI, 0.76-7.58) and acute kidney injury (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00-1.69). There was a graded association between cumulative exposure to PPIs and risk of CKD progression. This was not the case for cumulative H2B use.
Initiation of PPI therapy and cumulative PPI exposure is associate with increased risk of CKD progression in a large, North European healthcare system. Although consistent, the association was modest in magnitude, and cannot exclude residual confounding.
PubMed ID
28583827 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in prevalence, incidence and spontaneous loss of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms: a prospective population-based cohort study, the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128561
Source
Gut. 2012 Oct;61(10):1390-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Eivind Ness-Jensen
Anna Lindam
Jesper Lagergren
Kristian Hveem
Author Affiliation
HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Forskningsvegen 2, Levanger N-7600, Norway. eivind.ness-jensen@ntnu.no
Source
Gut. 2012 Oct;61(10):1390-7
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroesophageal Reflux - drug therapy - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Histamine H2 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Remission, Spontaneous
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
Changes in the occurrence of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms (GORS) in the population remain uncertain. This study aimed to determine the prevalence changes, the incidence and the spontaneous loss of GORS.
This population-based cohort study was conducted within the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (the HUNT study), a longitudinal series of population-based health surveys in Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway. The study base encompassed all adult residents in the county, and the participants reported the degree of GORS during the previous 12 months. The number of participants included were 58,869 (64% response rate) in 1995-7 and 44,997 (49%) in 2006-9. Of these, 29,610 persons (61%) were prospectively followed up for an average of 11 years.
Between 1995-7 and 2006-9, the prevalence of any, severe and at least weekly GORS increased by 30% (from 31.4% to 40.9%), 24% (from 5.4% to 6.7%) and 47% (from 11.6% to 17.1%), respectively. The average annual incidence of any and severe GORS was 3.07% and 0.23%, respectively. In women, but not men, the incidence of GORS increased with increasing age. The average annual spontaneous loss (not due to antireflux medication) of any and severe GORS was 2.32% and 1.22%, respectively. The spontaneous loss of GORS decreased with increasing age.
Between 1995-7 and 2006-9 the prevalence of GORS increased substantially. At least weekly GORS increased by 47%. The average annual incidence of severe GORS was 0.23%, and the corresponding spontaneous loss was 1.22%. The incidence and spontaneous loss of GORS were influenced by sex and age.
PubMed ID
22190483 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical, endoscopic and morphological manifestations of oesophageal lesion in systemic scleroderma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262228
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(6):67-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A E Karateev
A E Movsiian
M M Anan'eva
S G Radenska-Lopovok
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(6):67-74
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Barrett Esophagus - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Biopsy
Endoscopy, Digestive System - methods
Esophageal pH Monitoring
Esophagitis, Peptic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Quality of Life
Research Design
Russia - epidemiology
Scleroderma, Systemic - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Oesophageal lesion is the commonest visceral manifestation of systemic scleroderma (SSD) affecting the quality of life and fraught with serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical, endoscopic andmorphological manifestations of oesophageal lesion in systemic scleroderma and its relationships with other clinical symptoms and pharmacotherapy of the disease.
479 patients with SSD (93.7% women, 6.3% men, mean age 48.7 +/- 19.2 yr). All of them underwent EGDS in 2005-2010. 123 patients were examined for the detection of Barrett's oesophagus (BO), total screening regardless of complaints was conducted in 2010. Control group included 1018 age and sex-matched patients with RA who underwent EGDS in 2008-2009.
Oesophageal lesions occurred much more frequently in SSD than in RA. Oesophageal symptoms were documented in 70.0 and 29.9% cases, non-erosive oesopahgitis in 28.8 and 1.5%, erosive esophagitis in 22.5 and 2.2% ulcers in 0.8 and 0% (p
PubMed ID
25799834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decreasing incidence of peptic ulcer complications after the introduction of the proton pump inhibitors, a study of the Swedish population from 1974-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89286
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2009;9:25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hermansson Michael
Ekedahl Anders
Ranstam Jonas
Zilling Thomas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. michael.hermansson@vgregion.se
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2009;9:25
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Aspirin - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Helicobacter Infections - complications
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer - complications - drug therapy
Peptic Ulcer Perforation - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Despite a decreasing incidence of peptic ulcer disease, most previous studies report a stabile incidence of ulcer complications. We wanted to investigate the incidence of peptic ulcer complications in Sweden before and after the introduction of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in 1988 and compare these data to the sales of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). METHODS: All cases of gastric and duodenal ulcer complications diagnosed in Sweden from 1974 to 2002 were identified using the National hospital discharge register. Information on sales of ASA/NSAID was obtained from the National prescription survey. RESULTS: When comparing the time-periods before and after 1988 we found a significantly lower incidence of peptic ulcer complications during the later period for both sexes (p
PubMed ID
19379513 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135541
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Apr;58(4):C4271
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Peter Bytzer
Jens Frederik Dahlerup
Jens Ravn Eriksen
Dorte Ejg Jarbøl
Steffen Rosenstock
Signe Wildt
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Køge Hospital, Denmark. pmby@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Apr;58(4):C4271
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amoxicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antidiarrheals
Bismuth - therapeutic use
Clarithromycin - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Therapy, Combination
Dyspepsia
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone
Metronidazole - therapeutic use
Organometallic Compounds - therapeutic use
Peptic Ulcer - drug therapy
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Salicylates - therapeutic use
Stomach Neoplasms
Tetracycline - therapeutic use
Abstract
National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first degree relatives to patients with gastric cancer, in NSAID-naive patients, who need long-term NSAID therapy, and in patients presenting with dyspepsia and no alarm symptoms. Non-endoscoped patients can be tested with a urea-breath test or a faecal antigen test. Endoscoped patients can be tested with a rapid urease test. Proton pump inhibitor therapy should be stopped at least 1 week prior to Hp testing. All infected patients should be offered Hp eradication therapy. First-line treatment is 7-day triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and clarithromycine in combination with metronidazole or amoxicilline. Quadruple therapy for 2 weeks with bismuthsubsalicylate, tetracycline, metronidazole and a proton pump inhibitor is recommended in case of treatment failure. Hp testing should be offered to all patients after eradication therapy but is mandatory in patients with ulcer disease, noninvasive gastric cancer or MALT lymphoma. Testing after eradication should not be done before 4 weeks after treatment has ended.
PubMed ID
21466771 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in utilisation of gastroprotective drugs between 2001 and 2005 in Australia and Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114964
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;22(7):735-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Susan E Tett
Ingrid Sketris
Charmaine Cooke
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Nadia Barozzi
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;22(7):735-43
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Australia
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Mining
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - trends
Histamine H2 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Humans
Nova Scotia
Pharmacoepidemiology
Pharmacovigilance
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Social Security
Time Factors
Abstract
This study aimed to compare use of histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), 2001-2005, in the elderly and social security beneficiaries in Australia (AUS) and Nova Scotia, Canada (NS).
Prescription dispensing data were collected for all subsidised H2RAs and PPIs. In AUS, dispensing data for concession beneficiaries were obtained from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme database. In NS, data were sourced from the Pharmacare database. Relevant population data were used to convert to World Health Organisation Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical defined daily doses (2005) per 1000 beneficiaries per day (DDD/1000/day).
Overall use of gastroprotective agents was similar and rising in NS and AUS (100-160?DDD/1000/day) over this 5-year time window. However, the proportion of this use accounted for by PPIs was far higher in AUS (over 85% by 2005) than in NS (23% rising to 35% over the 5?years). In AUS, PPI use rose from 50 to about 140?DDD/1000/day over the 5?years, whereas PPI use in NS rose slowly to less than 60?DDD/1000/day by 2005. H2RA use in NS was always high (over 100?DDD/1000/day), whereas in AUS, H2RA use fell from 54 to around 24?DDD/1000/day over this period.
AUS had much higher use of PPIs than NS over 2001-2005. The proportion of PPIs in all gastroprotective agents rose in AUS to be nearly 90%. The differences in utilisation during this time window could lead to differences in health outcomes from either lower gastro-intestinal bleeding risk or higher long-term adverse effects of PPIs.
PubMed ID
23559528 View in PubMed
Less detail

[European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp-EuReg protocol): The first results of Russian centers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272879
Source
Ter Arkh. 2016;88(2):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
D S Bordin
O B Yanova
R A Abdulkhakov
V V Tsukanov
M A Livzan
S G Burkov
N V Zakharova
E Yu Plotnikova
M F Osipenko
L V Tarasova
I V Maev
Yu A Kucheryavyi
M A Butov
O A Sablin
S V Kolbasnikov
I N Voinovan
S R Abdulkhakov
A V Vasyutin
E A Lyalyukova
N N Golubev
I V Savilova
L V Grigoryeva
A G Kononova
Colm O'Morain
Mercedes Ramas
Adrian G Mcnicholl
Javier P Gisbert
Source
Ter Arkh. 2016;88(2):33-8
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Breath Tests - methods
Clinical Protocols
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Helicobacter pylori - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Urease - analysis
Abstract
To assess the clinical practice of diagnosis and treatment in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection and to compare this practice with the international guidelines in the European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, Hp-EuReg protocol), a multicenter prospective observational study initiated by the European Helicobacter and Microbiota Study Group. MATERIALs AND METHODS: The data of 813 patients infected with H. pylori and entered in the Hp-EuReg register by the Russian centers in 2013-2015 were analyzed.
The most common methods for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection are histology (40.3%), rapid urease test (35.7%), and serology (17.2%). The duration of H. pylori eradication therapy was 7, 10, and 14 days in 18.0, 49.3, and 25.1%, respectively. To monitor the effectiveness of treatment, the investigators used a histological examination (34%), a urea breath test (27.3%), H. pylori stool antigen (22.8%), and a rapid urease test (16.3%). A serological test was carried out in 2.5% of the cases. No monitoring was done in 13.5% of the patients. The average eradication efficiency was 82.6%. If the therapy was ineffective, 80% of physicians did not intend to prescribe a new cycle of treatment.
Significant differences were found between clinical practice and the current guidelines.
PubMed ID
27030181 View in PubMed
Less detail

[GerdQ: tool for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in primary care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143626
Source
Recenti Prog Med. 2010 Mar;101(3):115-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Domenico Della Casa
Guido Missale
Renzo Cestari
Author Affiliation
Cattedra di Chirurgia Generale, AO Spedali Civili, Università di Brescia.
Source
Recenti Prog Med. 2010 Mar;101(3):115-7
Date
Mar-2010
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consensus
Family Practice
Gastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Logistic Models
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Abstract
Diagnosis and effective management of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) need a new approach. The 2009 Montreal Consensus recommended that the clinical diagnosis of GERD should be made on the presence of troublesome symptoms. GerdQ, a patient centered-self assessment questionnaire, is made to assist health care professionals. Also, it is easy to use, no diagnostic test required, for example without previous specialist referral or endoscopy. GerdQ is a well documented questionnaire, developed on the basis of evidence. GerdQ has three potential uses in clinical practice: (1) to diagnose gastroesophagel reflux disease with an accuracy similar to that of the gastroenterological evaluation; (2) to assess the relative impact of the disease on patient's lives and to assist in choice of treatment; (3) to measure response to treatment over the time.
PubMed ID
20461953 View in PubMed
Less detail

Healthcare-associated and nosocomial bacterial infections in cirrhosis: predictors and impact on outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266760
Source
Liver Int. 2015 Feb;35(2):391-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Konstantina Sargenti
Hanne Prytz
Anna Strand
Emma Nilsson
Evangelos Kalaitzakis
Source
Liver Int. 2015 Feb;35(2):391-400
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cross Infection - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology
Longitudinal Studies
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Population-based data on the occurrence of healthcare-associated (HCA) and hospital-acquired (HA) bacterial infections in cirrhosis, their predictors, and their impact on outcome are limited.
All patients with incident cirrhosis in 2001-2010 residing in an area of 600,000 inhabitants were retrospectively identified. All serious bacterial infections (resulting in or occurring during an inpatient hospital episode) during this period were registered. Acquisition type, site of infection, occurrence of infection-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), acute kidney injury (AKI) and bacterial resistance were analysed. Patients were followed longitudinally until death, transplant or end of 2011.
A total of 398 serious infections occurred in 241/633 (38%) patients. Forty-seven per cent were HCA and 21% HA. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use was more common in HA (80%) vs. HCA (64%) vs. community-acquired (44%) infections (P 0.05). Antibiotic-resistant infections were more frequent among HA (17%) than HCA (6%) or community-acquired (8%) infections (P
PubMed ID
25039438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Helicobacter pylori eradication in the Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285967
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Jun - Jul;52(6-7):678-685
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eva Doorakkers
Jesper Lagergren
Vijaya Krishna Gajulapuri
Steven Callens
Lars Engstrand
Nele Brusselaers
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Jun - Jul;52(6-7):678-685
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amoxicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Clarithromycin - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Helicobacter Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Metronidazole - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori is associated with peptic ulcers and gastric cancer and its eradication aims to prevent these conditions. The recommended eradication regimen is triple therapy, consisting of a proton-pump inhibitor in combination with clarithromycin and amoxicillin or metronidazole for 7 days. Yet, other antibiotic regimens are sometimes prescribed. We aimed to assess the use of eradication therapy for H. pylori in the Swedish population during the last decade.
This population-based study used data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. From July 2005 until December 2014, all regimens that can eradicate H. pylori were identified and evaluated according to patients' age and sex and calendar year of eradication.
We identified 157,915 eradication episodes in 140,391 individuals (53.8% women, 42.6% older than 60 years), who correspond to 1.5% of the Swedish population. The absolute number and incidence of eradications decreased over the study period. Overall, 91.0% had one eradication and 0.1% had more than three. Of all eradications, 95.4% followed the recommended regimen, while 4.7% did not. The latter group was overrepresented among individuals aged =80 years (7.8%). Amoxicillin and clarithromycin were most frequently prescribed, while metronidazole was rarely used (0.01%). Other prescribed antibiotics were ciprofloxacin (2.4%), doxycycline (1.4%), nitrofurantoin (0.7%), norfloxacin (0.5%) and erythromycin (0.3%).
During the last decade in Sweden H. pylori eradication has been frequently prescribed, but the incidence of eradication has slowly declined. Most eradications followed the recommended regimen, including those occurring after a previous eradication.
PubMed ID
28323552 View in PubMed
Less detail

32 records – page 1 of 4.