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The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
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[A comparison of the immune response induced by DNA or by an inactivated vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57514
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Morozova
R V Popova
T G Maksimova
E E Mitrofanova
V N Bakhvalova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - genetics - immunology - pathogenicity
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - immunology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
Glycoproteins - immunology
Immunization - methods
Lethal Dose 50
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Vaccines, DNA - immunology
Vaccines, Inactivated - immunology
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - immunology
Viral Structural Proteins - immunology
Viral Vaccines - immunology
Abstract
BALB/c mice were immunized with recombinant plasmid DNA pSVK3-ENS1 and pcDNAI-NS3 containing, respectively, genes E-NS1 and NS3 of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus. Antibodies to TBE virus proteins were detected in the blood sera of the immunized animals by the method of the enzyme immunoassay. Though the titers of virus-specific antibodies in the sera of mice immunized with protein vaccines exceeded those registered after immunization with DNA vaccines, essential protective immunity was observed after the use of both vaccines.
PubMed ID
10808575 View in PubMed
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Acquired angioedema--occurrence, clinical features and associated disorders in a Danish nationwide patient cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108201
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2013;162(2):149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anette Bygum
Hanne Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2013;162(2):149-55
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioedema - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived - therapeutic use
Autoantibodies - immunology
B-Lymphocytes - immunology
Bradykinin - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Complement C1 Inactivator Proteins - immunology - metabolism
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lymphocytosis - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The prevalence of acquired angioedema (AAE) is hitherto unknown and, to date, less than 200 patients have been reported worldwide. AAE is associated with lymphoproliferative conditions and autoantibodies against C1 inhibitor (C1INH). Rituximab (RTX) is increasingly used in the treatment of AAE patients.
A nationwide study of AAE patients was performed in Denmark. Clinical features, associated disorders, treatments and outcomes were registered.
Eight AAE patients were identified. The diagnostic delay was on average 1 year and 8 months. Patients were treated with C1INH concentrate or icatibant on demand. Six patients were diagnosed with a clonal B-cell disorder during follow-up, on average 2.5 years after the first swelling. Two patients had monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). Two patients received RTX.
AAE is a rare condition occurring in less than 10% of patients with C1INH deficiency in Denmark. AAE is highly associated with haematologic disorders, and we recommend yearly follow-up visits with clinical examination and blood tests including flow cytometry to diagnose B-cell conditions at an early stage. We report 2 patients with AAE and associated MBL, which is a benign expansion of clonal B lymphocytes. MBL can be the precursor of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia or is associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. If angioedema is poorly controlled with standard treatment regimens, we suggest treatment of the associated haematologic disorder. Based on a review of the literature and our own data, we recommend therapy with RTX, especially in patients with anti-C1INH autoantibodies.
PubMed ID
23921495 View in PubMed
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Activation of maternal Epstein-Barr virus infection and risk of acute leukemia in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80490
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 15;165(2):134-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2007
Author
Tedeschi Rosamaria
Bloigu Aini
Ogmundsdottir Helga M
Marus Alessia
Dillner Joakim
dePaoli Paolo
Gudnadottir Margret
Koskela Pentti
Pukkala Eero
Lehtinen Tuula
Lehtinen Matti
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Oncological Center, Aviano, Italy.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 15;165(2):134-7
Date
Jan-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - immunology
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Capsid Proteins - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections - complications - epidemiology - virology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Maternal Exposure
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
After identifying an association between maternal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the authors analyzed a nested case-control study within Finnish and Icelandic maternity cohorts with 7 million years of follow-up to confirm EBV's role in ALL. Offspring of 550,000 mothers were followed up to age 15 years during 1975-1997 by national cancer registries to identify leukemia cases. Mothers of cases and three quarters of matched mothers of controls were identified by national population registers. First-trimester sera from mothers of 304 ALL cases and 39 non-ALL cases and from 943 mothers of controls were analyzed for antibodies to viral capsid antigen, early antigen, and EBV transactivator protein ZEBRA. Relative risk, estimated as odds ratio (95% confidence interval), was adjusted for birth order and sibship size. Combining early antigen and/or ZEBRA immunoglobulin G antibodies with the presence of viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin M antibodies did not increase the estimate for ALL risk for viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin M alone (odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.2, 3.0). Both ZEBRA immunoglobulin G antibodies and viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin M antibodies were associated with an increased risk of non-ALL in the offspring (odds ratio = 4.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 16; odds ratio = 5.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 29, respectively), suggesting EBV reactivation in the mothers of non-ALL cases. EBV reactivation may be associated with a proportion of childhood leukemia.
PubMed ID
17005627 View in PubMed
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Adoptive transfer of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis in HgCl2 injected rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57752
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A. Saoudi
B. Bellon
Y. de Kozak
P. Druet
Author Affiliation
Pathologie rénale et vasculaire, INSERM U28, Hôpital Broussais, Paris, France.
Source
Curr Eye Res. 1992;11 Suppl:101-5
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens - immunology
Arrestin
Autoantigens - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - therapy
Disease Models, Animal
Eye Proteins - immunology
Female
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Male
Mercuric Chloride
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinitis - immunology - therapy
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Uveitis - immunology - therapy
Abstract
We previously demonstrated that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) injected-(Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 rats are protected against experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced by active immunization with the retinal S-antigen (S-Ag). To better understand the mechanisms of the protection promoted by HgCl2, we studied the effect of HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease on transferred EAU. We demonstrate herein that HgCl2 has no effect on adoptively transferred EAU. Therefore, the HgCl2-induced autoimmune disease does not affect effector S-Ag specific T cells activated in vitro but acts at an earlier stage.
PubMed ID
1424735 View in PubMed
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The advantage of mucosal immunization for polysaccharide-specific memory responses in early life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57382
Source
Eur J Immunol. 2005 Apr;35(4):1037-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Stefania P Bjarnarson
Håvard Jakobsen
Giuseppe Del Giudice
Emanuelle Trannoy
Claire-Anne Siegrist
Ingileif Jonsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Landspitali-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Immunol. 2005 Apr;35(4):1037-45
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Toxins - immunology
Enterotoxins - immunology
Escherichia coli Proteins - immunology
Immunity, Mucosal - immunology
Immunologic Memory - immunology
Mice
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vaccines - immunology
Abstract
The aim of vaccination is to rapidly elicit protective immunity and generate memory for sustained protection. We studied the induction and persistence of polysaccharide (PS)-specific memory in neonatal and infant mice primed with pneumococcal conjugate (Pnc1-TT) by assessing the response to native pneumococcal PS (PPS-1), the kinetics of the PPS-1-specific IgG response to a second Pnc1-TT dose and affinity maturation. A subcutaneous (s.c.) Pnc1-TT booster induced a rapid increase in PPS-1-specific IgG, indicating efficient priming for memory by a single dose of Pnc1-TT already at 1 week of age. High levels were maintained for >12 weeks. However, a PPS-1 booster induced no response in neonatal or infant mice. The adjuvant LT-K63 significantly enhanced the IgG response and affinity to Pnc1-TT by both the s.c. and the intranasal (i.n.) route in all age groups. In neonatal and infant mice, PPS-1 and LT-K63 induced a booster response only when given i.n. following either s.c. or i.n. priming with Pnc1-TT and LT-K63. In contrast, PPS-1 with or without LT-K63 administered s.c. compromised the ongoing PPS-1-specific response elicited in neonatal mice by either s.c. or i.n. priming with Pnc1-TT and LT-K63. These results demonstrate the advantage of the mucosal route for elicitation of PS-specific memory responses in early life.
PubMed ID
15756644 View in PubMed
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[Advantages and disadvantages of inactivated and live influenza vaccine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178960
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu Z Gendon
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Clinical Trials as Topic
Egg Proteins - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Immunity, Mucosal
Immunization Schedule
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination - adverse effects
Vaccines, Attenuated - administration & dosage
Vaccines, Inactivated - administration & dosage
Abstract
Published data related with comparison studies of safety, efficiency and some other properties of cold-adapted live influenza vaccine (LIV) and of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) are analyzed. LIV and IIV do not differ by systemic reactions after administration; however, it is not ruled out that there can be unfavorable reactions in vaccination of persons with allergy to the chicken-embryo proteins as well as in cases of persistence/reversion of cold-adapted strain observed in vaccination of persons with primary impairments of the immune system. There are no convincing data, up to now, on that LIV is superior to IIV in coping with influenza pandemics. The efficiency of LIV and IIV for children aged 3 years and more and for healthy adults is virtually identical. Additional controllable field comparative studies of LIV and IIV efficiency in immunization of elderly persons are needed. Limited data on LIV efficiency for children aged 2 months and more were obtained. The need in a 2-stage vaccination of all age group with the aim of ensuring responses to all 3 LIV components is, certainly, a LIV disadvantage. In case of IIV, the 2-stage vaccination is needed only for persons who were not ill with influenza. The intranasal LIV administration has, from the practical and psychological standpoints, an advantage before the IIV administration by syringe. The ability of LIV to protect from the drift influenza-virus variations could be its advantage before IIV; still, more research is needed to verify it. Transplantable cell lines meeting the WHO requirements could be an optimal substrate for the production of LIV and IIV. Children are the optimal age group for influenza prevention by cold-adapted LIV, whereas, IIV fits better for vaccination of adults and elderly persons.
PubMed ID
15293504 View in PubMed
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Adverse events following vaccine or placebo injection in an efficacy trial of an outer membrane vesicle vaccine against group B meningococcal disease in Norwegian secondary schools 1988-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225287
Source
NIPH Ann. 1991 Dec;14(2):133-4; discussion 136-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991

Agglutinins and antibodies to Francisella tularensis outer membrane antigens in the early diagnosis of disease during an outbreak of tularemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38538
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
L. Bevanger
J A Maeland
A I Naess
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Agglutination Tests
Agglutinins - analysis
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - immunology
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Francisella tularensis - immunology
Humans
Immunoassay
Immunoglobulins - immunology
Middle Aged
Norway
Tularemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Tularemia was diagnosed in 57 patients during an outbreak in central Norway in 1984 and 1985. Clinical categories of the disease showed seasonal variations. A bacterial microagglutination test and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with class-specific antibodies against Francisella tularensis outer membrane (OM) antigens were evaluated for the early diagnosis of tularemia. ELISA with immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, or IgM antibodies and the microagglutination test differed only marginally in diagnostic sensitivity. The OM preparation harbored F. tularensis agglutinogens and contained a variety of proteins, several of which functioned as immunogens in tularemia patients, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). All 12 patients tested produced antibodies against a 43,000-molecular-weight OM protein. Individual variation was noted with regard to antibody response against other OM antigens. The OM is a suitable antigen preparation in ELISA for the diagnosis of tularemia and, presumably, contains antigens important in the immunobiology of tularemia.
PubMed ID
3356786 View in PubMed
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251 records – page 1 of 26.