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An increase of the plasma N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide in preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59084
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 May;89(5 Pt 1):747-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A M Pouta
O J Vuolteenaho
T J Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 May;89(5 Pt 1):747-53
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypertension - metabolism - ultrasonography
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Pre-Eclampsia - metabolism - ultrasonography
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - metabolism - ultrasonography
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Protein Precursors - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether increased concentrations of the N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide and of atrial natriuretic peptide are related to the severity of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 70 healthy pregnant women, 48 women with preeclampsia, and 19 women with gestational hypertension in the third trimester. We used a specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) method suitable for the determination of the plasma N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide in unextracted plasma. The atrial natriuretic peptide was measured by RIA from Sep-Pak C18-extracted plasma. RESULTS: The N-terminal peptide of proatrial natriuretic peptide levels were significantly higher in preeclamptic women than in healthy pregnant controls (median 571 [range 189-2000] versus 266 pmol/L [80-634], P
PubMed ID
9166314 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic treatment interruption of suspected lower respiratory tract infections based on a single procalcitonin measurement at hospital admission--a randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151175
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2009 May;15(5):481-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
K B Kristoffersen
O S Søgaard
C. Wejse
F T Black
T. Greve
B. Tarp
M. Storgaard
M. Sodemann
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus N., Denmark. kbk_dk@hotmail.com
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2009 May;15(5):481-7
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Calcitonin - blood
Denmark
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - methods
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Protein Precursors - blood
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Recent studies have suggested that procalcitonin (PCT) is a safe marker for the discrimination between bacterial and viral infection, and that PCT-guided treatment may lead to substantial reductions in antibiotic use. The present objective was to evaluate the effect of a single PCT measurement on antibiotic use in suspected lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in a Danish hospital setting. In a randomized, controlled intervention study, 223 adult patients admitted to the hospital because of suspicion of LRTI were included with 210 patients available for analysis. Patients were randomized to either PCT-guided treatment or standard treatment. Antibiotic treatment duration in the PCT group was based on the serum PCT value at admission. The cut-off point for recommending antibiotic treatment was PCT > or =0.25 microg/L. Physicians could overrule treatment guidelines. The mean duration of hospital stay was 5.9 days in the PCT group vs. 6.7 days in the control group (p 0.22). The mean duration of antibiotic treatment during hospitalization in the PCT group was 5.1 days on average, as compared to 6.8 days in the control group (p 0.007). In a subgroup analysis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, the mean length of stay was reduced from 7.1 days in the control group to 4.8 days in the PCT group (p 0.009). It was concluded that the determination of a single PCT value at admission in patients with suspected LRTIs can lead to a reduction in the duration of antibiotic treatment by 25% without compromising outcome. No effect on the length of hospital stay was found.
PubMed ID
19416298 View in PubMed
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Are the blood pressure and endocrine responses of healthy subjects exposed to cold stress altered by an acutely increased sodium intake?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10212
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2001 Jan-Feb;84(1-2):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
O. Arjamaa
T. Mäkinen
L. Turunen
P. Huttunen
J. Leppäluoto
O. Vuolteenaho
H. Rintamäki
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Medicine, PO BOX 5000, 90014 University of Oulu, Finland. olli.arjamaa@oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2001 Jan-Feb;84(1-2):48-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Cold
Female
Hematocrit
Hemoglobins
Humans
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Norepinephrine - blood
Protein Precursors - blood
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress - physiopathology
Abstract
In the study reported here, we examined blood pressure and endocrine responses in cold conditions during salt load in young healthy subjects who had previously shown increased resting blood pressure during acutely increased sodium intake. Subjects (n = 53) added 121 mmol sodium into their normal diet for 1 week. If their mean arterial pressure had increased by a minimum of 5 mmHg compared to the previous measure they were selected for subsequent experiments. The subjects (n = 8) were given 121 mmol supplemental sodium.day-1 for 14 days. They were then put into a wind tunnel for 15 min (temperature--15 degrees C, wind speed 3.5.ms-1). Their blood pressure increased (P
PubMed ID
11394253 View in PubMed
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Associations of serum n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids with plasma natriuretic peptides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288192
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;70(8):963-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
R. Daneshmand
S. Kurl
T-P Tuomainen
J K Virtanen
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;70(8):963-9
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arachidonic Acids - blood
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Protein Precursors - blood
Risk factors
Abstract
The n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but little is known about their association with natriuretic peptides (NPs), a marker for CVD risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of serum n-3 and n-6 PUFAs with NPs.
A cross-sectional analysis of the association between serum n-3 and n-6 PUFAs with plasma N-terminal atrial (NT-proANP) and brain (NT-proBNP) NPs in a population-based sample of 985 men aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland.
After adjustment for age and examination year, only serum n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid (ARA) was inversely associated with NT-proANP (P-trend across quartiles=0.02), but further adjustments for conventional risk factors (body mass index, smoking, alcohol intake, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and history of CVD) attenuated the association (P-trend=0.10). The associations with the other PUFAs were not statistically significant. Among the PUFAs, only serum n-3 PUFA docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; P-trend=0.03) and ARA (P-trend=0.02) had inverse associations with NT-proBNP after adjustment for age and examination years. The associations were again attenuated after further adjustments but remained statistically significant for DPA (P-trend=0.05). Our results also suggested that the inverse associations may be more evident among those using beta-blockers.
Our study suggests little overall impact of serum n-3 or n-6 PUFAs on plasma NPs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27071511 View in PubMed
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Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and N-terminal peptide of proANP (NT-proANP) in maternal and umbilical cord plasma in spontaneous labor and at elective cesarean section.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64933
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1992 Aug 21;46(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-1992

Atrial peptides, ANP(1-98) and ANP(99-126) in health and disease in an elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48509
Source
Eur Heart J. 1993 Nov;14(11):1508-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1993
Author
T. Wallén
S. Landahl
T. Hedner
J. Hedner
C. Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Vasa Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1993 Nov;14(11):1508-13
Date
Nov-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood
Comparative Study
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis
Humans
Kidney Diseases - blood
Male
Metabolic Diseases - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Protein Precursors - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Circulating immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide, IrANP(99-126) and the N-terminal fragment of the prohormone, IrANP(1-98) were measured in two population samples from the general population of Gothenburg, Sweden. A group of 85-year olds (974 subjects) and a group of 40-year olds (191 subjects) were investigated in respect of cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disease. IrANP(99-126) and IrANP(1-98) were significantly higher in the 85-year olds compared to the 40-year olds, and were significantly increased in subjects with congestive heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation and renal dysfunction but not in subjects with hypertension. Eighty-five-year-old subjects who were on treatment with digitalis, beta-adrenergic-blockers, nitrates and diuretics had significantly increased IrANP(99-126) and IrANP(1-98). In multivariate analysis IrANP(99-126) concentrations were predictive for congestive heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation and treatment with beta-blockers and anti-depressant drugs. IrANP(1-98) was predictive for congestive heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, renal failure and drug treatment with beta-blockers and neuroleptics. We conclude that measurements of circulating concentrations of IrANP(99-126) and/or IrANP(1-98) may add valuable information in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure and ischaemic heart disease in an elderly population. It remains to be determined whether routine measurements of circulating IrANP (99-126) and IrANP(1-98) may be of value in predicting current cardiovascular disease for the individual patient.
PubMed ID
8299633 View in PubMed
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Biphasic increase in serum inhibin B during puberty: a longitudinal study of healthy Finnish boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204294
Source
Pediatr Res. 1998 Oct;44(4):552-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
T. Raivio
A. Perheentupa
A S McNeilly
N P Groome
R. Anttila
M A Siimes
L. Dunkel
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Res. 1998 Oct;44(4):552-6
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Finland
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Protein Precursors - blood
Puberty - blood
Reference Values
Testis - anatomy & histology
Time Factors
Abstract
We investigated the concentrations of serum inhibin B and the pro-alphaC-containing inhibins (pro-alphaC inhibin) and their relations to serum FSH levels in 38 healthy boys during their progression through puberty. Furthermore, we studied the effect of recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) on pro-alphaC inhibin production in three prepubertal gonadotropin-deficient boys. The serum inhibin B level increased between Tanner stages G1 and G2 (p
PubMed ID
9773845 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
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Co-localization of beta/A4 and cystatin C in cortical blood vessels in Dutch, but not in Icelandic hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218240
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1994 May;89(5):367-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
J. Haan
M L Maat-Schieman
S G van Duinen
O. Jensson
L. Thorsteinsson
R A Roos
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Leiden, The Netherlands.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1994 May;89(5):367-71
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor - blood
Brain - physiopathology
Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy - complications - genetics - physiopathology
Cerebral Hemorrhage - complications - genetics - physiopathology
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20
Cystatins - blood - cerebrospinal fluid
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Point Mutation
Abstract
Based on the recent discovery of co-localization of beta/A4 and cystatin C in cortical blood vessels of patients with cerebral hemorrhages due to sporadic amyloid angiopathy and patients with Alzheimer's disease we investigated the presence of these two proteins in the cortical blood vessels of patients suffering from hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch (n = 11) and the Icelandic (n = 2) type. The brains of three patients with sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy were also investigated. Blood vessels of the Dutch patients clearly showed immunostaining with beta/A4 as well as with cystatin C antibodies, whereas the blood vessels of Icelandic patients showed only staining with cystatin C. In one of the three sporadic amyloid angiopathy patients co-localization was shown as well. The co-localization of mutated beta/A4 with normal cystatin C in the Dutch patients suggests that cystatin C deposition occurs secondarily to beta/A4 deposition. This is probably also the case in sporadic amyloid angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease. Cystatin C deposition may play a role in the development of cerebral hemorrhages and leukoencephalopathy.
PubMed ID
8085435 View in PubMed
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A comparison of high-mobility group-box 1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and procalcitonin in severe community-acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162518
Source
Crit Care. 2007;11(4):R76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Shahin Gaïni
Ole G Koldkjaer
Holger J Møller
Court Pedersen
Svend S Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, Søndre Boulevard 29, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. shahin.gaini@ouh.regionsddanmark.dk
Source
Crit Care. 2007;11(4):R76
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins
Aged
Bacteremia - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Calcitonin - blood
Carrier Proteins - blood
Community-Acquired Infections - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
HMGB1 Protein - blood
Humans
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - blood
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
High-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) has been known as a chromosomal protein for many years. HMGB1 has recently been shown to be a proinflammatory cytokine with a role in the immunopathogenesis of sepsis. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has a central role in the innate immune response when the host is challenged by bacterial pathogens. Procalcitonin (PCT) has been suggested as a marker of severe bacterial infections and sepsis. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of HMGB1, LBP and PCT in a well-characterised sepsis cohort. The study plan included analysis of the levels of the inflammatory markers in relation to the severity of infection, to the prognosis and to the ability to identify patients with bacteraemia.
Patients suspected of having severe infections and admitted to a department of internal medicine were included in a prospective manner. Demographic data, comorbidity, routine biochemistry, microbiological data, infection focus, severity score and mortality on day 28 were recorded. Plasma and serum were sampled within 24 hours after admission. Levels of all studied markers (HMGB1, LBP, PCT, IL-6, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count and neutrophils) were measured with commercially available laboratory techniques.
A total of 185 adult patients were included in the study; 154 patients fulfilled our definition of infection. Levels of HMGB1, LBP and PCT were higher in infected patients compared with a healthy control group (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
17625012 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.