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561 records – page 1 of 57.

Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Jun 24;153(26):1861-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-1991
Author
N H Mortensen
H R Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Ulykkes Analyse Gruppen, Odense Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Jun 24;153(26):1861-4
Date
Jun-24-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Protective Clothing
Protective Devices
Wood
Abstract
During the three-year period 1987-1989, 80 persons were registered with lesions following accidents with chain saws. The information in the casualty department records was supplemented by an interview questionnaire. Sale of chain saws increased from the middle of the nineteen eighties although no appreciable increase in the number of accidents was registered. One of the reasons for this may be the legislation concerning safety equipment which was introduced in the middle of the nineteen eighties. Further efforts are still required to reduce the number of accidents. On the basis of the results of the investigation, the following suggestions are made: 1. Written information about personal protective equipment should be issued to every purchaser of a chain saw. 2. An informative campaign about the correct use of the chain saw and the personal protective equipment. 3. Compulsory issue of personal protective equipment in connection with hire of a chain saw. 4. Safety gloves should be included in the safety requirements.
PubMed ID
1862569 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidents with saws. Are the safety measures satisfactory?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234961
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Jul 20;149(30):2046-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-1987

[A comparison of hearing losses in the workers of a shipyard and in loggers in relation to individual risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103534
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J. Pekkarinen
J. Starck
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ear Protective Devices
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Risk factors
Ships
Wood
Abstract
It is suggested that, within the same energy level, an impulse noise is more hazardous to hearing than a permanent noise. To justify this hypothesis, a study was performed with groups of wood-cutters and shipyard workers to investigate different characteristics of noise load (noise levels, noise impulsivity from the outside and under the ear-flaps, noise emission levels with regard to the length of work and using ear-flaps), and hearing losses (both real and forecasted on the Robinson model). To avoid individual factors, a computerized assessment of 38 pairs of workers from both teams was performed (with regard to similar noise emission levels, diastolic pressures, smoking habits, their military service backgrounds as to the service in heavy artillery units, absence of otic diseases, low consumption of salicylates). The results showed that, within the same energy level, the noise in the shipyard was three times as impulsive and more otic disorders inducing than the noise in the wood-cutters' working conditions.
PubMed ID
2276660 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acoustic trauma--preventive use of hearing protectors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75996
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Feb 20;16(4):XV-XVIII
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1992

Adverse health reactions in skin, eyes, and respiratory tract among dental personnel in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15729
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Latex
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Permeability
Polymers - adverse effects - chemistry
Prevalence
Resins, Synthetic - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Compounds
Volatilization
Abstract
Dental personnel manually handle products that contain monomers. Several studies have documented adverse health effects after exposure to such products. Gloves made of vinyl or latex are easily penetrated by monomers. Ordinary glasses, or visors, do not protect against vapour from polymer products. Dental face masks filter out about 40% of respirable particles. To survey the prevalence of asthma, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, hay fever/rhinitis, and hand eczema among dental personnel, a questionnaire was distributed to all dental teams in Northern Sweden. Referents were researchers, teachers, and secretaries from the same geographical area. The response rate was 76% for dental teams, and 66% for referents. The results show a significantly higher prevalence of conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis among dentists, both male and female. Hypersensitivity to dental materials was reported by significantly more dental personnel than by referents.
PubMed ID
9646391 View in PubMed
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Adverse reactions associated with respirator fit testing of healthcare workers in British Columbia, Canada: a review of compensation claim cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157374
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2007;62(4):197-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Sami Youakim
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. syouakim@telusplanet.net
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2007;62(4):197-200
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
British Columbia
Equipment Design
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Materials Testing
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds - adverse effects - immunology
Respiratory Protective Devices
Retrospective Studies
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
Thousands of healthcare workers in British Columbia are being fit tested for respirator use as a part of respiratory protection programs emanating from the SARS outbreak in 2003. The author reviews 8 claims submitted to the Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia for adverse reactions related to denatonium benzoate fit testing. The adverse effects varied in severity. Most claims involved respiratory symptoms and 3 dermatitis or angioedema symptoms. One asthmatic required hospitalization for a severe asthmatic reaction. These cases indicate that there may be potentially significant health risks associated with denatonium benzoate-based fit testing at least for a small group of susceptible individuals. More systematic research is required.
PubMed ID
18458024 View in PubMed
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Age gradient in the cost-effectiveness of bicycle helmets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32744
Source
Prev Med. 2000 May;30(5):401-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
B. Kopjar
T M Wickizer
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. branko.kopjar@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Prev Med. 2000 May;30(5):401-6
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Bicycling - economics
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Craniocerebral Trauma - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Head Protective Devices - economics - standards
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed the reduction in risk of head injuries associated with use of bicycle helmets among persons ages 3 to 70 and the cost-effectiveness of helmet use based on this estimated risk reduction. METHODS: To derive our cost-effectiveness estimates, we combined injury incidence data gathered through a detailed and comprehensive injury registration system in Norway, acute medical treatment cost information for the Norwegian health service, and information reported in the scientific literature regarding the health protective effects of helmet use. The analysis included all cases of head injuries reported through the registration system from 1990 through 1996. We performed an age-stratified analysis to determine the incidence of bicycle-related head injuries, the 5-year reduction in absolute risk of injury, the number needed to treat, and the cost-effectiveness of helmet use. To test the robustness of the findings to parameter assumptions, we performed sensitivity analysis. RESULTS: The risk of head injury was highest among children aged 5 to 16. The greatest reduction in absolute risk of head injury, 1.0 to 1.4% over 5 years estimated helmet lifetime, occurred among children who started using a helmet between the ages of 3 and 13. Estimates indicate that it would cost approximately U.S. $2,200 in bicycle helmet expenses to prevent any one upper head injury in children ages 3-13. In contrast, it would cost U.S. $10,000-25,000 to avoid a single injury among adults. CONCLUSIONS: Bicycle safety helmets appear to be several times more cost-effective for children than adults, primarily because of the higher risk of head injury among children. Programs aiming to increase helmet use should consider the differences in injury risk and cost-effectiveness among different age groups and target their efforts accordingly.
PubMed ID
10845749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aggravating and mitigating factors associated with cyclist injury severity in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257913
Source
J Safety Res. 2014 Sep;50:75-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Sigal Kaplan
Konstantinos Vavatsoulas
Carlo Giacomo Prato
Author Affiliation
Department of Transport, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet 116B, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
J Safety Res. 2014 Sep;50:75-82
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications
Bicycling - injuries
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Head Protective Devices - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Safety
Trauma Severity Indices
Young Adult
Abstract
Denmark is one of the leading cycling nations, where cycling trips constitute a large share of the total trips, and cycling safety assumes a top priority position in the agenda of policy makers. The current study sheds light on the aggravating and mitigating factors associated with cyclist injury severity on Danish roads by examining a comprehensive set of accidents involving a cyclist and a collision partner between 2007 and 2011.
This study estimates a generalized ordered logit model of the severity of cyclist injuries because of its ability to accommodate the ordered-response nature of severity while relaxing the proportional odds assumption.
Model estimates show that cyclist fragility (children under 10 years old and elderly cyclists over 60 years of age) and cyclist intoxication are aggravating individual factors, while helmet use is a mitigating factor. Speed limits above 70-80 km/h, slippery road surface, and location of the crash on road sections are aggravating infrastructure factors, while the availability of cycling paths and dense urban development are mitigating factors. Heavy vehicle involvement and conflicts between cyclists going straight or turning left and other vehicles going straight are aggravating vehicle involvement factors. Practical applications: The results are discussed in the context of applied policies, engineering, and traffic management solutions for bicycle safety in Denmark.
PubMed ID
25142363 View in PubMed
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Agreement statement from the 1st international rodeo research and clinical care conference: calgary, alberta, Canada (july 7-9, 2004).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174996
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2005 May;15(3):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005

Air management and physiological responses during simulated firefighting tasks in a high-rise structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149101
Source
Appl Ergon. 2010 Mar;41(2):251-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
F Michael Williams-Bell
Geoff Boisseau
John McGill
Andrew Kostiuk
Richard L Hughson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Ergon. 2010 Mar;41(2):251-9
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Fires
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Ontario
Oxygen consumption
Physical Exertion - physiology
Respiratory Protective Devices
Abstract
Air consumption, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), carbon dioxide output (VCO(2)) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER=VCO(2)/VO(2)) were measured directly from the self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) as 36 professional firefighters (three women) completed scenarios of high-rise stair climbing and fifth floor search and rescue. During stair climbing VO(2) was 75+/-8% VO(2max) (mean+/-SD), RER=1.10+/-0.10, and heart rate=91+/-3% maximum (based on maximum treadmill data). Firefighters stopped climbing on consuming 55% of the air cylinder then descended. In the fifth floor search and rescue VO(2) was slightly lower than stair climbing but RER remained elevated (1.13+/-0.12) reflecting high anaerobic metabolism. The first low air alarm sounded, indicating 25% of the air remaining in a "30-min cylinder", during the stair climb at 8 min with 19 of 36 sounding before 12 min. Aggressive air management strategies are required for safety in high-rise firefighting.
PubMed ID
19683700 View in PubMed
Less detail

561 records – page 1 of 57.