Skip header and navigation

Refine By

412 records – page 1 of 42.

3M diffractive multifocal intraocular lens: eight year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50890
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Mar;26(3):402-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J E Slagsvold
Author Affiliation
Eye Department, ASA, Arendal, Norway.
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Mar;26(3):402-7
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aphakia, Postcataract - surgery
Capsulorhexis
Comparative Study
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lenses, Intraocular
Phacoemulsification
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Postoperative Complications
Prosthesis Design
Refraction, Ocular
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the long-term results of implantation of the 3M diffractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL). SETTING: Eye Department, ASA, Arendal, Norway. METHODS: The study comprised 97 eyes in 72 patients. Follow-up was 8 years. Distance and near visual acuities, refractive results, contrast sensitivity, IOL centration, and neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) capsulotomies to treat posterior capsule opacification were evaluated. RESULTS: All patients without ocular pathology achieved a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 or better (i.e., 98.7% had a BCVA of 1.0 or better). Without correction, 73.8% of eyes had a Jaeger acuity of J3 or better and with distance correction, 92.1%. Emmetropia or within +/-0.25 diopter (D) of it was achieved in 58.8% of eyes. An astigmatic shift of 0.827 D cylinder correction was induced. This shift was mainly against the rule (0.717 D). Contrast sensitivity was reduced with spatial frequencies of 6 to 18 cycles per degree. No need for spectacles was reported by 54.2% of patients and by 68.0% of those with bilateral implantation. For near tasks, 63.9% of patients never used spectacles. The IOLs were well centered or minimally decentered in 99.0% of eyes. Posterior capsule opacification was treated by Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in 55.7% of eyes, with a mean time between surgery and treatment of 34.0 months +/- 23.2 (SD). CONCLUSION: This long-term study proved the 3M diffractive IOL to be safe and effective despite some reduction in contrast sensitivity at higher spatial frequencies. More than half the patients never wore spectacles; 2 of 3 patients with IOLs in both eyes never wore spectacles. Proper patient selection is crucial.
PubMed ID
10713237 View in PubMed
Less detail

5-year outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117830
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-2013
Author
Stefan Toggweiler
Karin H Humphries
May Lee
Ronald K Binder
Robert R Moss
Melanie Freeman
Jian Ye
Anson Cheung
David A Wood
John G Webb
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Date
Jan-29-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Equipment Failure Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure - etiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the 5-year outcome following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
Little is known about long-term outcomes following TAVI.
The 5-year outcomes following successful TAVI with a balloon-expandable valve were evaluated in 88 patients. Patients who died within 30 days after TAVI were excluded.
Mean aortic valve gradient decreased from 46 ± 18 mm Hg to 10 ± 4.5 mm Hg after TAVI and 11.8 ± 5.7 mm Hg at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend = 0.06). Mean aortic valve area increased from 0.62 ± 0.17 cm(2) to 1.67 ± 0.41 cm(2) after TAVI and 1.40 ± 0.25 cm(2) at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend
PubMed ID
23265333 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcome of everolimus-eluting versus sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in patients with diabetes mellitus (the DiabeDES IV randomized angiography trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275976
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Michael Maeng
Arvydas Baranauskas
Evald Høj Christiansen
Anne Kaltoft
Niels Ramsing Holm
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - mortality - radiography
Coronary Stenosis - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Thrombosis - mortality - radiography
Denmark
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality - radiography - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - radiography
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk factors
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We aimed to compare angiographic and clinical outcomes after the implantation of everolimus-eluting (EES) and sirolimus-eluting (SES) stents in patients with diabetes.
There are limited data on long-term outcome after EES vs SES implantation in diabetic patients.
We randomized 213 patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease to EES (n?=?108) or SES (n?=?105) implantation. Angiographic follow-up was performed 10 months after the index procedure and all patients were followed clinically for 4 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss at 10-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, the need for target lesion revascularization (TLR) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or TLR) at 4-year follow-up.
At 10-month angiographic follow-up, in-stent late lumen loss was 0.20?±?0.53 mm and 0.11?±?0.49 mm (P?=?0.28), and angiographic restenosis rate was 3.8% and 5.2% (P?=?0.72) in the EES and SES groups, respectively. At 4-year clinical follow-up, MACE had occurred in 22 (20.4%) patients in the EES group and 25 (23.8%) patients in SES group (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.47-1.49; P?=?0.55), with TLR performed in 6 (5.6%) and 10 (9.5%) patients in the two groups (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.21-1-58; P?=?0.28).
EES and SES had comparable 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
PubMed ID
25640050 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year follow-up study of fixed metal ceramic prosthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75777
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
R. Näpänkangas
M A Salonen
A M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cementation
Ceramics
Crowns
Dental Abutments
Dental Porcelain
Dental Prosthesis Design
Denture Design
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Esthetics, Dental
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingival Pocket - etiology
Humans
Male
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Post and Core Technique
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Students, Dental
Surface Properties
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to record patients' satisfaction with fixed metal ceramic bridges and crowns made by dental students and to evaluate the functioning and condition of the bridges and crowns clinically and radiologically. Out of the 60 patients treated at the Institute of Dentistry during 1984-85, 30 patients attended the follow-up examination (16 women, mean age 39, range 23-62 years and 14 men, mean age 44, range 26-65 years). The anamnestic data and data regarding treatment procedures were collected from the patient files. The patients had been supplied with 41 crowns and 24 bridges (mean 3.9 units, range 3-6 units), which included 61 abutments and 33 pontics or cantilever extensions (abutment/pontic ratio 1.85: 1). Marginal fidelity was unsatisfactory in 13% of the crowns and bridges and gingival bleeding and pockets of 4-6 mm were noted in 27% and 12% of cases, respectively. None of the subjects had caries in the abutments.
PubMed ID
9372460 View in PubMed
Less detail

10-year results of a new low-monomer cement: follow-up of a randomized RSA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119286
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Per Söderlund
Jon Dahl
Stephan Röhrl
Bo Nivbrant
Kjell G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Institution of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences and Department of Orthopedics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. per.soderlund@orthop.umu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods
Bone Cements - chemistry - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Titanium
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The properties and performance of a new low-monomer cement were examined in this prospective randomized, controlled RSA study. 5-year data have already been published, showing no statistically significant differences compared to controls. In the present paper we present the 10-year results.
44 patients were originally randomized to receive total hip replacement with a Lubinus SPII titanium-aluminum-vanadium stem cemented either with the new Cemex Rx bone cement or with control bone cement, Palacos R. Patients were examined using RSA, Harris hip score, and conventional radiographs.
At 10 years, 33 hips could be evaluated clinically and 30 hips could be evaluated with RSA (16 Cemex and 14 Palacos). 9 patients had died and 4 patients were too old or infirm to be investigated. Except for 1 hip that was revised for infection after less than 5 years, no further hips were revised before the 10-year follow-up. There were no statistically significant clinical differences between the groups. The Cemex cement had magnitudes of migration similar to or sometimes lower than those of Palacos cement. In both groups, most hips showed extensive radiolucent lines, probably due to the use of titanium alloy stems.
At 10 years, the Cemex bone cement tested performed just as well as the control (Palacos bone cement).
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 2001 Dec;72(6):572-8411817871
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2004 Sep;86(7):974-815446521
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1986;221:1-403468743
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 May 21;296(6634):1454-63132290
Cites: J Biomed Mater Res. 1993 May;27(5):565-748314809
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2000 Aug;15(5):570-510959994
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1994 Feb;65(1):20-38154277
Cites: J Appl Biomater. 1995 Spring;6(1):75-837703541
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1996 Mar;78(3):325-308613438
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1996 Sep;78(5):802-88836075
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2008 Dec;79(6):826-3119085502
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1993 Oct;(295):239-458403655
PubMed ID
23116438 View in PubMed
Less detail

10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties: a report on 780 cases from the Swedish Ankle Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129819
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Anders Henricson
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Ake Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics , Falun Central Hospital and Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden. anders.henricson@ltdalarna.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Ankle - adverse effects - methods
Cementation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Joint Prosthesis - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis.
Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint-excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus.
Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79-0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67-0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons.
The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements-even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results.
Notes
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2003 Jul;85-A(7):1321-912851358
Cites: Foot Ankle Surg. 2011 Sep;17(3):99-10221783065
Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2005 Mar;125(2):109-1915690167
Cites: Orthopade. 2006 May;35(5):527-3216598490
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2006 Jun;88(6):1272-8416757761
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):569-7417966014
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):575-8317966015
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):584-9117966016
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2008 May;90(5):605-918450626
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2008 Jul;90(7):885-818591597
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2009 Jan;91(1):69-7419092007
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2009 Jul;30(7):631-919589309
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Jan;468(1):199-20819618248
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Apr;468(4):951-719609630
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):10-420175657
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):114-820180720
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2010 Apr;31(4):301-520371016
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2010 Jul;92(7):958-6220595114
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2010 Sep 15;92(12):2150-520844156
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Dec;81(6):745-721067435
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Jan;469(1):225-3620593253
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2010 Dec;31(12):1048-5621189204
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2011 May;32(5):S493-50221733457
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2004 Jul;(424):73-915241146
PubMed ID
22066551 View in PubMed
Less detail

The AAA with a challenging neck: outcome of open versus endovascular repair with standard and fenestrated stent-grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88967
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Chisci Emiliano
Kristmundsson Thorarinn
de Donato Gianmarco
Resch Timothy
Setacci Francesco
Sonesson Björn
Setacci Carlo
Malina Martin
Author Affiliation
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Siena, Italy. e.chisci@gmail.com
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Italy
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) versus conventional open repair (OR) in patients with a short, angulated or otherwise challenging proximal neck. METHODS: The definition of a challenging proximal neck was based on diameter (>or=28 mm), length (or=60 degrees ), shape (reverse tapered or bulging), and thrombus lining (>50%). Between January 2005 and December 2007, 187 consecutive patients (159 men; mean age 73 years, range 48-92) operated for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were identified as having challenging proximal neck morphology. Of these, 61 patients were treated with OR at center I (group A), 71 with standard EVAR (group B; 45 center I, 29 center II) and 52 with fenestrated EVAR (group C) at center II. Clinical examination and computed tomography were performed at 1 month and yearly thereafter. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups A, B, and C regarding primary technical success rate, 30-day mortality, or late AAA-related mortality. The mean length of follow-up was 19.5 months (range 0-40). Freedom from reintervention at 3 years was 91.8%, 79.7%, and 82.7% for groups A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.042). The only statistically significant difference between standard and fenestrated EVAR was a higher incidence of late sac expansion [9 (12.2%) versus 1 (1.9%), p = 0.036] in the standard stent-graft group. Reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR (p = NS), but open reinterventions were more common after OR. Reinterventions after EVAR were related to the presence of an angulated (p = 0.039) or short neck (p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The results of EVAR and OR were similar for AAAs with a challenging proximal neck. Endovascular reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR, particularly in patients with an angulated or short neck. Open reinterventions were more common after OR. More patients and long-term data are needed to confirm these findings.
Notes
Comment In: J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):147-819456195
PubMed ID
19456190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acetabular reconstruction with impaction bone grafting and cemented polyethylene socket in total hip revision arthroplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276221
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):267-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
I. Kostensalo
M. Seppänen
P. Virolainen
J. Mokka
M. Koivisto
K T Mäkelä
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):267-72
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - mortality
Bone Cements
Bone Transplantation - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - surgery
Polyethylene
Postoperative Complications
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bone deficiency in revision total hip arthroplasty is a challenge to the surgeon. One option for restoration of the bone stock is impaction bone grafting and use of a cemented socket. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term clinical outcome of impaction bone grafting and cemented socket revisions.
A total of 59 patients (60 hips) underwent revision arthroplasty with impaction bone grafting and application of a cemented socket on the acetabular side in the Turku University Hospital from 1999 to 2004. The study end-point was re-revision for any reason. The cumulative percentages for survival were followed and estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Associations between occurrence of re-revision and potential risk factors were analyzed with logistic regression. Results were quantified by odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The mean age of the patients was 69 years (33% male). A total of 3% of the patients had a class I Paprosky acetabular defect, 38% had class II, and 55% had class III.
The overall survival rate was 73%. The mean follow-up time was 7 years. The most common reason for re-revision was aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (13 patients, 81% of re-revisions). Cox's regression analysis did not identify any risk factors for re-revision.
Our results were inferior compared to some previous studies. Impaction bone grafting of acetabular defects in revision total hip arthroplasty may not always provide a reliable bone stock in long-term.
PubMed ID
25681057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute obstruction by Pannus in patients with aortic medtronic-hall valves: 30 years of experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107029
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2013 Dec;96(6):2123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Vegard Skalstad Ellensen
Knut Sverre Andersen
Nicola Vitale
Einar Skulstad Davidsen
Leidulf Segadal
Rune Haaverstad
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: vegard.ellensen@helse-bergen.no.
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2013 Dec;96(6):2123-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aortic Valve - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Insufficiency - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - epidemiology - etiology
Echocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
Acute dysfunction of mechanical aortic valve prostheses is a life-threatening adverse event. Pannus overgrowth, which is fibroelastic hyperplasia originating from the periannular area, is one cause of dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the annual incidence of readmittance resulting from acute obstruction caused by pannus during 30 years of observation in patients with Medtronic-Hall aortic valve prostheses and to analyze the risk factors associated with pannus development.
From 1982 to 2004, 1,187 patients in our department underwent aortic valve replacement with Medtronic-Hall mechanical monoleaflet valve prostheses. As of December 31, 2012, 27 of these patients (2.3%) had presented with acute valve dysfunction caused by pannus obstruction.
The annual incidence of pannus was 0.7 per 1,000. The median time from the primary operation to prosthetic dysfunction was 11.1 years (range, 1.2 to 26.8 years). Of the 20 patients who underwent reoperation, 2 died. Seven patients died before reoperation. Women had a higher risk for the development of obstructing pannus, and patients with pannus obstruction were younger. Valve size was not an independent risk factor.
Women and younger patients are at higher risk for pannus development. When acute dysfunction by pannus is suspected in a mechanical aortic valve, an immediate echocardiogram and an emergency aortic valve replacement should be carried out because of the potential of a fatal outcome.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Thorac Surg. 2013 Dec;96(6):212824296182
PubMed ID
24070701 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptive Bone Remodeling of the Femoral Bone After Tumor Resection Arthroplasty With an Uncemented Proximally Hydroxyapatite-Coated Stem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274138
Source
J Clin Densitom. 2016 Apr-Jun;19(2):202-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mikkel R Andersen
Michael M Petersen
Source
J Clin Densitom. 2016 Apr-Jun;19(2):202-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adult
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Biocompatible Materials - pharmacology
Bone Density
Bone Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Bone remodeling
Denmark
Durapatite - pharmacology
Female
Femur - radiography - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - prevention & control
Prosthesis Design
Sarcoma, Ewing - pathology - surgery
Abstract
Loss of bone stock and stress shielding is a significant challenge in limb salvage surgery. This study investigates the adaptive bone remodeling of the femoral bone after implantation of a tumor prosthesis with an uncemented press fit stem. We performed a prospective 1 yr follow-up of 6 patients (mean age: 55 (26-78) yr, female/male=3/3) who underwent bone tumor resection surgery of the proximal femur (n=3) or distal femur (n=3). Reconstruction was done using a Global Modular Replacement System (Stryker® Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ) tumor prosthesis, and all patients received a straight-fluted 125-mm uncemented press-fit titanium alloy stem with hydroxyapatite coating of the proximal part of the stem. Measurements of bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) were done postoperatively and after 3, 6, and 12 mo in the part of the femur bone containing the Global Modular Replacement System stem using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. BMD was measured in 3 regions of interest (ROIs) in the femur bone. Nonparametric analysis of variance (Friedman test) for evaluation of changes in BMD over time. BMD decreased in all 3 ROIs with time. In ROI 1 (p=0.01), BMD decreased by 10% after 3 mo and ended with a total decrease of 14% after 1 yr. In ROI 2 (p=0.006), BMD was decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 9% below the postoperative value. In ROI 3 (p=0.009), BMD decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 8% below the postoperative value. A bone loss of 8%-9% during the first postoperative year was seen along the femoral stem, but in the bone containing the hydroxyapatite-coated part of the stem, the decrease in BMD was 14%, thus indicating that stress shielding of this part of the bone may play a role for the adaptive bone remodeling.
PubMed ID
25843447 View in PubMed
Less detail

412 records – page 1 of 42.