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Androgen-deprivation therapy in treatment of prostate cancer and risk of myocardial infarction and stroke: a nationwide Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116108
Source
Eur Urol. 2014 Apr;65(4):704-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Christina G Jespersen
Mette Nørgaard
Michael Borre
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: christina.gade@ki.au.dk.
Source
Eur Urol. 2014 Apr;65(4):704-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Androgen Antagonists - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Orchiectomy - adverse effects
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Risk assessment
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has been suggested to increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, but data are inconsistent.
To investigate the association between ADT and risk for MI and stroke in Danish men with prostate cancer.
A national cohort study of all patients with incident prostate cancer registered in the Danish Cancer Registry from January 1, 2002, through 2010 was conducted.
We used Cox regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of MI and stroke for ADT users versus nonusers, adjusting for age, prostate cancer stage, comorbidity, and calendar period. Additionally, we stratified the analysis on preexisting MI/stroke status.
Of 31,571 prostate cancer patients, 9204 (29%) received medical endocrine therapy and 2060 (7%) were orchidectomized. Patients treated with medical endocrine therapy had an increased risk for MI and stroke with adjusted HRs of 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.49) and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.06-1.35), respectively, compared with nonusers of ADT. We found no increased risk for MI (HR: 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83-1.29) or stroke (HR: 1.11; 95% CI, 0.90-1.36) after orchiectomy. One limitation of the study is that information on prognostic lifestyle factors was not included and might have further informed our estimates.
In this nationwide cohort study of >30 000 prostate cancer patients, we found that endocrine hormonal therapy was associated with increased risk for MI and stroke. In contrast, we did not find this association after orchiectomy.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Urol. 2014 Apr;65(4):710-223498063
Comment In: Eur Urol. 2013 Sep;64(3):e59-6023623050
PubMed ID
23433805 View in PubMed
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An explicit values clarification task: development and validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168228
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Nov;63(3):350-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Deb Feldman-Stewart
Sarah Brennenstuhl
Michael D Brundage
Tom Roques
Author Affiliation
Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada. deb-feldman-stewart@krcc.on.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Nov;63(3):350-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Decision Making
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
(a) To determine which of two values clarification exercises (VCE), based on theoretical decision rules used naturally by people, would be more helpful to patients making a treatment decision and (b) to evaluate the convergent validity of the most helpful VCE when part of a decision aid for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer.
Two studies were completed. Study 1: Ninety community volunteers were assigned at random to one of three groups and all made a hypothetical treatment decision. Two groups received VCEs, one with a summary and one without, and the third was a control group. Study 2: In a multi-centre phase II trial, 69 patients used the decision aid that included the exercise ranked most helpful in Study 1. Decision aid assessments included the decisional conflict scale, treatment valuation assessment and regret.
Study 1: Most participants in each group ranked the VCE with the summary as most helpful. Study 2: VCE outputs, such as the size of the summary, were associated in predictable ways with the decision aid assessments.
The VCE ranked most helpful in Study 1 showed convergent validity with decision aid assessments.
With the interpretation of the VCE outputs now validated, a randomized controlled trial is required to determine if the exercise helps patients more than the aid without the exercise.
PubMed ID
16860521 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of living conditions in cancer patients who have returned to work after curative treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82554
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Oct;14(10):1020-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Gudbergsson Saevar B
Fosså Sophie D
Borgeraas Elling
Dahl Alv A
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Oncology & Rehabilitation, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Trust and University of Oslo, Montebello, 0310, Oslo, Norway. gudbergsson@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Oct;14(10):1020-9
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Disease-Free Survival
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Housing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Social Class
Social Support
Testicular Neoplasms - therapy
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
GOALS OF WORK: The goal of this study was to explore living conditions among disease-free cancer survivors participating in the labour force after successful primary treatment. Their living conditions were compared with the conditions of matched controls from the general Norwegian population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Living conditions are social indicators that stimulate social inclusion and reduce exclusion such as economy, employment, health, housing and social participation. A questionnaire covering living conditions with established questions from population surveys was mailed to 852 cancer survivors and 1,548 controls. Valid responses were obtained from 51% cancer survivors (216 women with breast cancer, 49 men with prostate cancer, and 165 with testicular cancer) and 39% controls (317 women and 279 men). MAIN RESULTS: Compared to their controls cancer survivors showed no difference in work hours or full-time jobs, but reported significantly poorer physical and mental work capacity. This was associated with significantly more somatic diseases among survivors and poorer general health status in male survivors. The survivors had significantly smaller households and more living space than controls. No significant differences were observed concerning economy or social participation, except that significantly more female survivors than controls stated that they had enough friends. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of poorer health, tumour-free survivors after breast, testicular, and prostate cancer report mostly equal living conditions compared to matched controls. The protection hypothesis of holding jobs as a precondition for normal living condition was confirmed in our study of a sample of cancer survivors with good outcome.
PubMed ID
16572315 View in PubMed
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Comparison of endocrine and radiation therapy in locally advanced prostatic cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234140
Source
Eur Urol. 1988;15(3-4):182-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J. Aro
R. Haapiainen
M. Kajanti
S. Rannikko
O. Alfthan
Author Affiliation
Second Department of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Eur Urol. 1988;15(3-4):182-6
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Estradiol - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Estradiol Congeners - therapeutic use
Ethinyl Estradiol - therapeutic use
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Orchiectomy
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Radiotherapy - methods
Random Allocation
Abstract
151 patients with locally advanced prostatic cancer (T3-4 M0), representing 38% of the 404 cancer patients in a Finnish multicenter study, were randomly assigned to one of three treatment arms: orchiectomy, estrogens or radiotherapy. During the 4-year follow-up period there were no significant differences in the progression rates (appearance of metastases in bone scan) between the therapy groups. The frequency of thromboembolic and other cardiovascular complications was highest in the estrogen group (13/50 patients). In the radiotherapy group, 19 of 45 patients had bowel or bladder complications. On the other hand, orchiectomy has few, if any, complications. The high risk of complications associated with estrogens and radiotherapy has to be taken into consideration in the selection of treatment.
PubMed ID
3063541 View in PubMed
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Controversies in the management of localized prostate cancer: consensus development by Canadian urologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189357
Source
Can J Urol. 2002 Jun;9 Suppl 1:30-5
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Laurence H Klotz
Yves Fradet
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook & Women's College Health ciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Urol. 2002 Jun;9 Suppl 1:30-5
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Urology
Abstract
This consensus statement emerged from the 2nd Canadian Uro-Oncology Congress, held January 16-20, 2002. The attendees at this meeting comprised approximately 125 urologists from across Canada, representing both community and academic perspectives. The group heard presentations by experts in the field addressing the spectrum of controversies in prostate cancer. After each session, the meeting broke into workshop sessions where attendees discussed the controversies raised by the speakers. Present in each workshop was a reporter who summarized the consensus of the group. These summaries were collected and integrated into a set of questions. At the end of the congress, the attendees voted on the questions and controversies identified through the workshop process.
PubMed ID
12121593 View in PubMed
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Designing tailored Internet support to assist cancer patients in illness management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92547
Source
AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2007;:635-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ruland Cornelia M
Jeneson Annette
Andersen Trine
Andersen Roar
Slaughter Laura
Bente-Schjødt-Osmo
Moore Shirley M
Author Affiliation
Center for Shared Decision Making and Nursing Research, Rikshospitalet Medical Center, Oslo.
Source
AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2007;:635-9
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Disease Management
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Internet
Male
Norway
Patient Education as Topic
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Self Care - methods
Social Support
Abstract
This paper describes the development and a preliminary usage analysis of a novel Internet-based support system that assists cancer patients in symptom monitoring and disease management. The system, called WebChoice, allows patients to monitor symptoms over time, and provides access to evidence-based self-management options tailored to their reported symptoms as well as a communication area where patients can ask questions to a clinical nurse specialist and exchange experiences with other cancer patients. A currently ongoing randomized clinical trial evaluates effects of WebChoice on patient outcomes. This paper describes essential features of WebChoice, steps we used to design it as user-friendly as possible; and preliminary findings on patients use.
PubMed ID
18693913 View in PubMed
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Development of a hypermedia program designed to assist patients with localized prostate cancer in making treatment decisions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204857
Source
J Biocommun. 1998;25(2):2-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
J. Jenkinson
L. Wilson-Pauwels
M A Jewett
N. Woolridge
Author Affiliation
Division of Biomedical Communications, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto.
Source
J Biocommun. 1998;25(2):2-11
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
CD-ROM
Computer Communication Networks
Decision Making
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Hypermedia
Male
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Software Design
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
The Prostate Centre, a hypermedia program integrating CD-ROM and Internet technology, was developed to help patients with localized prostate cancer access detailed and current information about available treatment options. Personal interviews with ten patients confirmed the need for more specific information examining the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer, as well as the suitability of computers for conveying this information. Sample screen designs effectively determined patients' visual preferences and were a useful springboard for conversation about a number of other relevant topics. Pilot testing of the resulting prototype elicited a positive response about the program from this sample audience. Patients regarded the program as useful, relevant to their needs, and navigable. Although the small sample size limited the study's generalizability, the method of involving patients in the design process successfully guided the program's development toward a greater fit with the users' needs.
PubMed ID
9700546 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evolution or revolution: changes in the approach to urologic care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125132
Source
Can J Urol. 2012 Apr;19(2):6155
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Jack Barkin
Source
Can J Urol. 2012 Apr;19(2):6155
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
PubMed ID
22512954 View in PubMed
Less detail

The experience of indigenous traditional healing and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180998
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Sarcoma - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
Indigenous traditional healing is an ancient, deeply rooted, complex holistic health care system practiced by indigenous people worldwide. However, scant information exists to explain the phenomenon of indigenous medicine and indigenous health. Even less is known about how indigenous healing takes place. The purpose of this study is to describe the meaning and essence of the lived experience of 4 indigenous people who have been diagnosed with cancer and have used indigenous traditional healing during their healing journey. The researcher used a qualitative phenomenological methodology to collect and analyze interview data. Interviews were conducted with 4 self-identified indigenous people, ages 49 to 61, from diverse tribes. Time since cancer diagnosis varied from 2 to 20 years; types of cancer included lung, prostate, sarcoma of the leg, and breast. Four themes and 2 subthemes emerged (1) receiving the cancer diagnosis (with subthemes of knowing something was wrong and hearing something was wrong), (2) seeking healing, (3) connecting to indigenous culture, and (4) contemplating life's future. This study demonstrates that 4 individuals with cancer integrated Western medicine and traditional healing to treat their cancer. This knowledge provides necessary data about the phenomena of being healed by indigenous healers. Such data may serve as an initial guide for health care professionals while interacting with indigenous people diagnosed with cancer. Accordingly, traditional healing may be used to decrease health disparities.
PubMed ID
15035869 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.