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An estimate of prostate cancer prevalence for a demographically similar workforce population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201923
Source
W V Med J. 1999 May-Jun;95(3):116-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
C S Westra
A M Ducatman
M. Niewiadomska-Bugaj
G R Hobbs
Author Affiliation
Kimberly Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wisc., USA.
Source
W V Med J. 1999 May-Jun;95(3):116-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - economics
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
United States
Abstract
To obtain an estimate of prostate cancer prevalence when screening is applied to a workforce, we conducted a search of the English world literature from West Virginia University. Thirty-one papers which met selection criteria for screening were followed by histopathologic diagnosis. Publications using Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) as a screening test were reviewed. The data from these papers were combined. Population characteristics were then selected to represent the demographics of a working population. Prostate cancer prevalence estimates for the demographics of a working population were calculated using a weighted mean after relevant studies lacked homogeneity and therefore failed meta-analysis. The expected prevalence of prostate cancer in a workplace surveillance population is 2.03% (95% C.I. from 1.69% to 2.37%). This information is useful to entities considering workplace surveillance. Selection bias, geographic location, and uncertainty in prediction of a representative workforce population may strongly influence estimates.
PubMed ID
10352569 View in PubMed
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An inverse association between preserved fish and prostate cancer: results from a population-based case-control study in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157489
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(2):222-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Kym Mina
Lin Fritschi
Kenneth C Johnson
Author Affiliation
School of Population Health, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Kym.Mina@uwa.edu.au
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(2):222-6
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Female
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Seafood
Abstract
Epidemiological studies suggest that fish consumption may be a protective factor against the development of prostate cancer. We investigated the association between prostate cancer risk and fresh and preserved fish consumption among participants of a population-based case-control study (1,534 cases, 1,607 controls). Fish intake was measured using a dietary questionnaire that collected both frequency of consumption of a given portion size. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated an inverse association between preserved fish and prostate cancer risk for all levels of consumption, but reductions only reached statistical significance for the category of 1 to 3 servings of preserved fish per month (odds ratio = 0.78, confidence interval = 0.64-0.95). Consumption of any fat or energy from preserved fish was also associated with reduced risk. There was no suggestion of reduced prostate cancer risk with consumption of fresh and canned fish. Our results suggest that consumption of preserved fish may reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
18444154 View in PubMed
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Cancer and Mediterranean dietary traditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197103
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Sep;9(9):869-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
A. Trichopoulou
P. Lagiou
H. Kuper
D. Trichopoulos
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Athens Medical School, Greece.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Sep;9(9):869-73
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Fabaceae
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Meat - adverse effects
Mediterranean Region - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Plant Oils
Plants, Medicinal
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The incidence of cancer overall in Mediterranean countries is lower than in Scandinavian countries, the United Kingdom, and the United States. This is mostly accounted for by the lower incidence among Mediterranean countries of cancer of the large bowel, breast, endometrium, and prostate. These forms of cancer have been linked to dietary factors, particularly low consumption of vegetables and fruit, and to a certain extent, high consumption of meat. The traditional Mediterranean diet is characterized by high consumption of foods of plant origin, relatively low consumption of red meat, and high consumption of olive oil, which in several studies has been reported to be more beneficial against cancer than other forms of added lipids. By taking into account the established or presumed nutritional causation of major forms of cancer and the composition of the traditional Mediterranean diet, estimates can be derived concerning the fraction of cancer occurrence in highly developed Western countries that could be attributed to their diets in comparison with the healthy traditional Mediterranean diet. Although estimates can only be crude, it can be calculated that up to 25% of the incidence of colorectal cancer, approximately 15% of the incidence of breast cancer, and approximately 10% of the incidence of prostate, pancreas, and endometrial cancer could be prevented if the populations of highly developed Western countries could shift to the traditional healthy Mediterranean diet.
PubMed ID
11008902 View in PubMed
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Dairy products, calcium, phosphorous, vitamin D, and risk of prostate cancer (Sweden)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21129
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):559-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
J M Chan
E. Giovannucci
S O Andersson
J. Yuen
H O Adami
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):559-66
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphorus, Dietary - administration & dosage
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Dairy products consistently have been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, yet the mechanism of this relationship remains unknown. Recent hypotheses propose that 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25 D) is protective for prostate cancer. One study in the United States found that calcium consumption, which can lower circulating 1,25 D, was associated with higher risk of advanced prostate cancer, and we sought to address this hypothesis in a distinct population. METHODS: We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer conducted in Orebro, Sweden, with 526 cases and 536 controls. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we examined the relationship of dairy products, dietary calcium, phosphorous, and vitamin D with risk of total, extraprostatic, and metastatic prostate cancer. RESULTS: Calcium intake was an independent predictor of prostate cancer (relative risk (RR) = 1.91, 95 percent confidence interval (CI) 1.23-2.97 for intake > or = 1183 vs.
Notes
Comment In: Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):541-310189038
PubMed ID
10189041 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns and prostate cancer risk: report from the population based ULSAM cohort study of Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105741
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2014;66(1):77-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Erika Ax
Hans Garmo
Birgitta Grundmark
Anna Bill-Axelson
Lars Holmberg
Wulf Becker
Björn Zethelius
Tommy Cederholm
Per Sjögren
Author Affiliation
a Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2014;66(1):77-87
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted
Diet, Mediterranean
Diet, Protein-Restricted
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
European Continental Ancestry Group
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity
Nutrition Assessment
Patient compliance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Dietary pattern analyses have increased the possibilities to detect associations between diet and disease. However, studies on dietary pattern and prostate cancer are scarce. Food intake data in the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort was determined by 7-day food records. Adherence to a modified Mediterranean Diet Score (mMDS) and a low carbohydrate-high protein (LCHP) score were grouped as low, medium, or high in the whole study population (n = 1,044) and in those identified as adequate reporters of energy intake (n = 566), respectively. Prostate cancer risk was analyzed with Cox proportional hazard regression (median follow-up 13 years) and competing risk of death was considered. There were no associations between dietary patterns and prostate cancer (n = 133) in the whole study population. Among adequate reporters the mMDS was not associated with prostate cancer (n = 72). The LCHP score was inversely related to prostate cancer in adequate reporters, adjusted hazard ratios; 0.55 (0.32-0.96) for medium and 0.47 (0.21-1.04) for high compared to low adherent participants (P-for-trend 0.04). Risk relations were not attributable to competing risk of death. In this study, a LCHP diet was associated with lower prostate cancer incidence. Relations emerged in adequate reporters, underscoring the importance of high-quality dietary data.
PubMed ID
24325263 View in PubMed
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Healthcare resources should be targeted to chemoprevention in prostate cancer: the argument for.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22936
Source
Eur Urol. 1996;29 Suppl 2:13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
L J Denis
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, AZ Middelheim, Antwerp, Belgium.
Source
Eur Urol. 1996;29 Suppl 2:13-6
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group
Anticarcinogenic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Health Care Rationing
Health Resources
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Primary Prevention
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The search for localised disease increases the incidence of histologically determined prostate cancer, termed 'minimal' disease. Moreover, the number of locally advanced cases found at surgery increases the push towards surgery at earlier stages of disease. We already have knowledge of risk factors and epidemiological autopsy incidences, and have developed hypotheses to prevent clinical prostate cancer, therefore we should now be performing chemoprevention studies in time to save the next generation from unneeded treatment and healthcare deficits.
PubMed ID
8717454 View in PubMed
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The impact of context on evidence utilization: a framework for expert groups developing health policy recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168883
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Oct;63(7):1811-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Mark J Dobrow
Vivek Goel
Louise Lemieux-Charles
Nick A Black
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Canada. mark.dobrow@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Oct;63(7):1811-24
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mass Screening
Policy Making
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Should the same evidence lead to the same decision outcomes in different decision-making contexts? In order to improve comprehension of this issue, this study considers how context influences evidence utilization in the development of health policy recommendations. We used an embedded multiple case study design to study how four expert groups formulated policy recommendations for breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancer screening in Ontario, Canada. We interviewed expert group members and analysed meeting agendas/minutes, interim/final reports and other case-related documents. Our analyses revealed varying policy objectives; the use, neglect, or overextended consideration of three key decision support tools; the varying skills/abilities of expert group members in using different decision support tools; the varying impact of effect modifiers, resource constraints and political interests; and the differing development/consideration of context-specific evidence to address uncertainty in the external decision-making context. While more work is needed to determine if these findings are generalizable beyond cancer screening policy, we believe the central challenge for evidence-based policy is not to develop international evidence, but rather to develop more systematic, rigorous, and global methods for identifying, interpreting, and applying evidence in different decision-making contexts. Our analyses suggest that identification of evidence must distinguish between different policy objectives in order to link a broad conceptualization of evidence to appropriate policy questions. Interpretation of evidence must acknowledge the varying nature of evidence for different policy objectives, balancing existing emphasis on evidentiary quality with more sophisticated methods for assessing the generalizability of evidence. The application of evidence must also acknowledge different policy objectives, appropriately employing rule-based grading schemes and agreement-based consensus methods that are sensitive to the nature of the evidence and contexts involved.
PubMed ID
16764980 View in PubMed
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Intake of flavonoids and risk of cancer in Finnish men: The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158287
Source
Int J Cancer. 2008 Aug 1;123(3):660-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2008
Author
Jaakko Mursu
Tarja Nurmi
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jukka T Salonen
Eero Pukkala
Sari Voutilainen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. jaakko.mursu@uku.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2008 Aug 1;123(3):660-3
Date
Aug-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthocyanins - administration & dosage
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Flavanones - administration & dosage
Flavones - administration & dosage
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Flavonols - administration & dosage
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Limited amount of evidence suggests that high intake of flavonoids could be associated with decreased risk of lung and colorectal cancer, but more studies are needed. In this prospective cohort study, we assessed the relation between the intakes of 26 flavonoids from 5 subclasses; flavonols, flavones, flavanones, flavan-3-ols and anthocyanidins, and the risk of lung, prostate and colorectal cancer. The study population consisted of 2,590 middle-aged eastern Finnish men of the prospective population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. The mean intake of flavonoids was 131.0 +/- 214.7 mg/day. During the mean follow-up time of 16.2 years, 62 lung, 138 prostate, and 55 colorectal cancers occurred. All lung cancer cases occurred among either current smokers (n = 50) or previous smokers (n = 12). After adjustment for age, examination years, body mass index, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, physical activity and intakes of alcohol, total fat, saturated fat, fiber, vitamin C and E, relative risk (RR) for lung cancer was 0.27 (95% CI: 0.11-0.66) for the highest quarter of total flavonoid intake as compared with the lowest quarter. Out of 5 flavonoid subclasses, flavonols and flavan-3-ols were associated with lung cancer, for the highest quarter of intake the RR were 0.29 (95% CI: 0.11-0.78) and 0.24 (95% CI: 0.09-0.64), respectively. No association between flavonoid intake and risk of prostate or colorectal cancer were found. We conclude that high intake of flavonoids is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer in middle-aged Finnish smoking men.
PubMed ID
18338754 View in PubMed
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Intake of selenium in the prevention of prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172740
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2005 Nov;16(9):1125-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Mahyar Etminan
J Mark FitzGerald
Martin Gleave
Keith Chambers
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, 1020 Pine Ave. West, Montreal, Quebec H3A1A2, Canada. metminan@shaw.ca
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2005 Nov;16(9):1125-31
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Chemoprevention
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Selenium - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Recent studies have suggested that selenium intake may prevent the risk of developing prostate cancer. Results from some of these studies have given conflicting results. Because of these discrepant results we sought to explore the association between selenium intake and prostate cancer by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.
We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library between 1966 and May 2005 for articles that examined the association between intake of selenium and the risk of prostate cancer. We abstracted the data from relevant studies. A random effects model was used to estimate pooled relative risks for both cohort and case-control studies. Heterogeneity was assessed graphically using a Funnel Plot.
Sixteen studies (eleven cohort studies and five case-control studies) were included in the final analysis. The pooled relative risk of prostate cancer for any intake of selenium was 0.72 (0.61-0.84) for cohort studies and 0.74 (0.61-1.39) for case-control studies. The pooled relative risk of moderate intake was 0.74 (0.61-0.90) for cohort studies and 0.74 (0.39-1.39) for case-control studies. A dose-response trend was observed when we stratified the studies by disease severity.
The results of our systematic review suggest that selenium intake may reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The results confirm the need for large randomized controlled trials, which are ongoing, to answer this question.
PubMed ID
16184479 View in PubMed
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Lifetime total physical activity and prostate cancer risk: a population-based case-control study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91590
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2008;23(11):739-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Wiklund Fredrik
Lageros Ylva Trolle
Chang Ellen
Bälter Katarina
Johansson Jan-Erik
Adami Hans-Olov
Grönberg Henrik
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, 171-77, Stockholm, Sweden. fredrik.wiklund@ki.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2008;23(11):739-46
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Exercise
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The etiologic role of physical activity in prostate cancer development is unclear. We assessed the association between lifetime total physical activity and prostate cancer risk in a Swedish population-based case-control study comprising 1,449 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,118 unaffected population controls. Information regarding physical activity was obtained via a self-administered questionnaire assessing occupational, household, and recreational activity separately at various ages throughout an individual's lifetime. Clinical data (TNM-classification, Gleason sum and PSA) was obtained from linkage to the National Prostate Cancer Registry. Overall, we observed no association between lifetime total physical activity and prostate cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77-1.41 for > or =49.7 vs.
PubMed ID
18931922 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.