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5-alpha-reductase 2 polymorphisms as risk factors in prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19112
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Söderström T
Wadelius M
Andersson S-O
Johansson J-E
Johansson S
Granath F
Rane A
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. torbjorn.soderstrom@lmk.ck.lul.se
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Cell Differentiation
DNA - blood - metabolism
DNA Primers - chemistry
European Continental Ancestry Group
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostate-Specific Antigen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology - etiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone 5-alpha-Reductase - genetics
Abstract
Prostate cancer is a significant cause of death in Western countries and is under the strong influence of androgens. The steroid 5alpha-reductase 2 catalyzes the metabolism of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone in the prostate gland. The enzyme is a target in pharmacological treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia using specific inhibitors such as finasteride. Makridakis et al. have characterized the V89L and A49T polymorphisms in recombinant expression systems. The L allelic variant has a lower Vmax/Km ratio than the V variant. In the A49T polymorphism, the T variant has an increased Vmax/Km ratio. We performed a population-based case-control study of the impact of the SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms on the risk of prostate cancer. We also studied the relation between the genotypes and age at diagnosis, tumor, node, metastasis stage, differentiation grade, prostate specific antigen and heredity. The study included 175 prostate cancer patients and 159 healthy controls that were matched for age. There was an association with SRD5A2 V89L LL genotype and metastases at the time of diagnosis, OR 5.67 (95% CI 1.44-22.30) when adjusted for age, differentiation grade, T-stage and prostate specific antigen. Heterozygous prostate cancer cases that carried the SRD5A2 A49T AT genotype were significantly younger than cases that carried the AA genotype, (mean age 66 years vs 71, P = 0.038). The SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms were, however, not associated with altered prostate cancer risk. Further studies of the V89L polymorphism may lead to better understanding of the etiology of prostate cancer metastases.
PubMed ID
12042668 View in PubMed
Less detail

5-Alpha reductase inhibitor use and prostate cancer survival in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275383
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 15;138(12):2820-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2016
Author
Teemu J Murtola
Elina K Karppa
Kimmo Taari
Kirsi Talala
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 15;138(12):2820-8
Date
Jun-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Early Detection of Cancer
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Abstract
Randomized clinical trials have shown that use of 5a-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) lowers overall prostate cancer (PCa) risk compared to placebo, while the proportion of Gleason 8-10 tumors is elevated. It is unknown whether this affects PCa-specific survival. We studied disease-specific survival by 5-ARI usage in a cohort of 6,537 prostate cancer cases diagnosed in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial and linked to the national prescription database for information on medication use. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prostate cancer-specific deaths. For comparison, survival among alpha-blocker users was also evaluated. During the median follow-up of 7.5 years after diagnosis a total of 2,478 men died; 617 due to prostate cancer and 1,861 due to other causes. The risk of prostate cancer death did not differ between 5-ARI users and nonusers (multivariable adjusted HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.72-1.24 and HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.69-1.41 for usage before and after the diagnosis, respectively). Alpha-blocker usage both before and after diagnosis was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.08-1.54 and HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.30-1.86, respectively). The risk increase vanished in long-term alpha-blocker usage. Use of 5-ARIs does not appear to affect prostate cancer mortality when used in management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Increased risk associated with alpha-blocker usage should prompt further exploration on the prognostic role of lower urinary tract symptoms.
PubMed ID
26804670 View in PubMed
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The 5alpha-reductase type II A49T and V89L high-activity allelic variants are more common in men with prostate cancer compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173682
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Yvonne L Giwercman
Per-Anders Abrahamsson
Aleksander Giwercman
Virgil Gadaleanu
Göran Ahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Wallenberg Laboratory, entrance 46, SE - 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. yvonne.giwercman@kir.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase - blood - genetics
Aged
Alanine
Alleles
Arginine
Case-Control Studies
Dihydrotestosterone - blood
Disease Progression
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutamine
Humans
Leucine
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostatic Hyperplasia - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Androgen - blood - genetics
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Testosterone - blood
Threonine
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Valine
Abstract
To compare men with prostate disease with those from the general population regarding polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene and in the 5alpha-reductase II (SRD5A2) gene.
The SRD5A2 polymorphisms A49T, V89L and R227Q, the androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeats and sex hormone status was investigated in men with prostate cancer (CaP) (n=89), benign prostate hyperplasia (n=45) and healthy military conscripts (n=223).
The SRD5A2 high-activity allele variants A49T AT and V89L LL were more frequent in CaP-patients compared to general population, p=0.026 and p=0.05, respectively. CaP progression was, however, independent of SRD5A2 variants. In contrary, men with GGN
PubMed ID
16039774 View in PubMed
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5-a reductase inhibitors, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and risk of male breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271757
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Sep;26(9):1289-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Robinson D
Garmo H
Holmberg L
Stattin P
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Sep;26(9):1289-97
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms, Male - chemically induced - pathology
Cohort Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia - drug therapy - pathology
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
5-a reductase inhibitors (5-ARI) have been suggested to increase the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to study the risk of breast cancer in men on 5-ARI, in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) not on 5-ARI, and in men without BPH.
We performed a population-based cohort study in Sweden with data from The Prescribed Drug Register, The Patient Register, and The Cancer Register. Men on 5-ARI, men on a-blockers, or men who had undergone a transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) prior to or during 2006-2008 were included as exposed to BPH and a specific treatment thereof. For each exposed man, five unexposed men were selected. Risk of breast cancer was calculated in Cox proportional hazard models.
There were 124,183 exposed men and 545,293 unexposed men, and during follow-up (median 6 years), 99 men with breast cancer were diagnosed. Compared to unexposed men, men on 5-ARI had a hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer of 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-2.03), men on a-blockers had HR 1.47 (95% CI 0.73-2.95), and men with a TUR-P had HR 1.99 (95% CI 1.05-3.75).
No increased risk of breast cancer was observed for men on 5-ARI. However, the increased risk of breast cancer among men who had undergone a TUR-P, a strong indicator of BPH, suggests that the endocrine milieu conducive to BPH is associated with male breast cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26109464 View in PubMed
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10 times as many prostate cancers in 2021?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133774
Source
Manag Care. 2011 May;20(5):51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Source
Manag Care. 2011 May;20(5):51
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
PubMed ID
21667630 View in PubMed
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10-year experience with I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital: results for 1,100 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141809
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Aug 1;80(5):1323-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2011
Author
Juanita Crook
Jette Borg
Andrew Evans
Ants Toi
E P Saibishkumar
Sharon Fung
Clement Ma
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jcrook@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Aug 1;80(5):1323-9
Date
Aug-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brachytherapy - adverse effects - methods
Disease-Free Survival
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Penile Erection - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Prostate
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Radiotherapy Dosage
Urination Disorders - drug therapy
Abstract
To report outcomes for 1,111 men treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy (BT) at a single institution.
A total of 1,111 men (median age, 63) were treated with iodine-125 prostate BT for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between March 1999 and November 2008. Median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 5.4 ng/ml (range, 0.9-26.1). T stage was T1c in 66% and T2 in 34% of patients. Gleason score was 6 in 90.1% and 7 or 8 in 9.9% of patients. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (2-6 months course) was used in 10.1% of patients and combined external radiotherapy (45 Gy) with BT (110 Gy) in 4.1% (n = 46) of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards were used to determine predictors of failure.
Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 6-114), but for biochemical freedom from relapse, a minimum PSA test follow-up of 30 months was required (median 54; n = 776). There were 27 failures, yielding an actuarial 7-year disease-free survival rate of 95.2% (96 at risk beyond 84 months). All failures underwent repeat 12-core transrectal ultrasound -guided biopsies, confirming 8 local failures. On multivariate analysis, Gleason score was the only independent predictor of failure (p = 0.001; hazard ratio, 4.8 (1.9-12.4). Median International Prostate Symptom score from 12 to 108 months ranged between 3 and 9. Of the men reporting baseline potency, 82.8% retained satisfactory erectile function beyond 5 years.
Iodine-125 prostate BT is a highly effective treatment option for favorable- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and is associated with maintenance of good urinary and erectile functions.
PubMed ID
20675072 View in PubMed
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10-year survival and quality of life in patients with high-risk pN0 prostate cancer following definitive radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94068
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Berg Arne
Lilleby Wolfgang
Bruland Oyvind Sverre
Fosså Sophie Dorothea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Erectile Dysfunction - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Survival Analysis
Urination Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T(1-4p)N(0)M(0) prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. RESULTS: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T(3-4) or Gleason score (GS) > or =7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T(1-2) and GS or =7B.
PubMed ID
17703896 View in PubMed
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17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18539
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2002 Dec;83(1-5):119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
P. Vihko
P. Härkönen
O. Oduwole
S. Törn
R. Kurkela
K. Porvari
A. Pulkka
V. Isomaa
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu and Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. pvihko@whoccr.oulu.fi
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2002 Dec;83(1-5):119-22
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology
Cell Line
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - enzymology
Oxygen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology
Protein Isoforms
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs) catalyze the interconversions between active 17 beta-hydroxysteroids and less-active 17-ketosteroids thereby affecting the availability of biologically active estrogens and androgens in a variety of tissues. The enzymes have different enzymatic properties and characteristic cell-specific expression patterns, suggesting differential physiological functions for the enzymes. Epidemiological and endocrine evidence indicate that estrogens play a key role in the etiology of breast cancer while androgens are involved in mechanisms controlling the growth of prostatic cells, both normal and malignant. Recently, we have developed, using LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines, a cell model to study the progression of prostate cancer. In the model LNCaP cells are transformed in culture condition to more aggressive cells, able to grow in suspension cultures. Our results suggest that substantial changes in androgen and estrogen metabolism occur in the cells during the process. These changes lead to increased production of active estrogens during transformation of the cells. Data from studies of breast cell lines and tissues suggest that the oxidative 17HSD type 2 may predominate in human non-malignant breast epithelial cells, while the reductive 17HSD type 1 activity prevails in malignant cells. Deprivation of an estrogen response by using specific 17HSD type 1 inhibitors is a tempting approach to treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Our recent studies demonstrate that in addition to sex hormone target tissues, estrogens may be important in the development of cancer in some other tissues previously not considered as estrogen target tissues such as colon. Our data show that the abundant expression of 17HSD type 2 present in normal colonic mucosa is significantly decreased during colon cancer development.
PubMed ID
12650708 View in PubMed
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(18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography and bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of bone metastases in newly diagnosed, high-risk prostate cancer patients: study protocol for a multicentre, diagnostic test accuracy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276760
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016;16:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Randi F Fonager
Helle D Zacho
Niels C Langkilde
Lars J Petersen
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016;16:10
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Denmark
Fluorine Radioisotopes - chemistry
Humans
Male
Multimodal Imaging
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Risk factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
For decades, planar bone scintigraphy has been the standard practice for detection of bone metastases in prostate cancer and has been endorsed by recent oncology/urology guidelines. It is a sensitive method with modest specificity. (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography has shown improved sensitivity and specificity over bone scintigraphy, but because of methodological issues such as retrospective design and verification bias, the existing level of evidence with (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited. The primary objective is to compare the diagnostic properties of (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone scintigraphy on an individual patient basis.
One hundred forty consecutive, high-risk prostate cancer patients will be recruited from several hospitals in Denmark. Sample size was calculated using Hayen's method for diagnostic comparative studies. This study will be conducted in accordance with recommendations of standards for reporting diagnostic accuracy studies. Eligibility criteria comprise the following: 1) biopsy-proven prostate cancer, 2) PSA = 50 ng/ml (equals a prevalence of bone metastasis of ˜ 50% in the study population on bone scintigraphy), 3) patients must be eligible for androgen deprivation therapy, 4) no current or prior cancer (within the past 5 years), 5) ability to comply with imaging procedures, and 6) patients must not receive any investigational drugs. Planar bone scintigraphy and (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography will be performed within a window of 14 days at baseline. All scans will be repeated after 26 weeks of androgen deprivation therapy, and response of individual lesions will be used for diagnostic classification of the lesions on baseline imaging among responding patients. A response is defined as PSA normalisation or = 80% reduction compared with baseline levels, testosterone below castration levels, no skeletal related events, and no clinical signs of progression. Images are read by blinded nuclear medicine physicians. The protocol is currently recruiting.
To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the largest prospective studies comparing (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography and bone scintigraphy. It is conducted in full accordance with recommendations for diagnostic accuracy trials. It is intended to provide valid documentation for the use of (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography for examination of bone metastasis in the staging of prostate cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26753880 View in PubMed
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30-day mortality and major complications after radical prostatectomy: influence of age and comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172378
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Oct 19;97(20):1525-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-2005
Author
Shabbir M H Alibhai
Marc Leach
George Tomlinson
Murray D Krahn
Neil Fleshner
Eric Holowaty
Gary Naglie
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. shabbir.alibhai@uhn.on.ca
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Oct 19;97(20):1525-32
Date
Oct-19-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Prostatectomy - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Radical prostatectomy is associated with excellent long-term disease control for localized prostate cancer. Prior studies have suggested an increased risk of short-term complications among older men who underwent radical prostatectomy, but these studies did not adjust for comorbidity.
We examined mortality and complications occurring within 30 days following radical prostatectomy among all 11,010 men who underwent this surgery in Ontario, Canada, between 1990 and 1999 using multivariable logistic regression modeling. We adjusted for comorbidity using two common comorbidity indices. Statistical tests were two-sided.
Overall, 53 men (0.5%) died, and 2195 [corrected] (19.9%[corrected]) had one or more complications within 30 days of radical prostatectomy. In models adjusted for comorbidity and year of surgery, age was associated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio = 2.04 per decade of age, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 3.39). However, the absolute 30-day mortality risk was low, even in older men, at 0.66% (95% CI = 0.2 to 1.1%) for men aged 70-79 years. In adjusted models, age was associated with an increased risk of cardiac (Ptrend
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Mar 15;98(6):421; author reply 421-216537836
Erratum In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Nov 7;99(21):1648
PubMed ID
16234566 View in PubMed
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1928 records – page 1 of 193.