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Allergic rhinitis alone or with asthma is associated with an increased risk of sickness absences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142913
Source
Respir Med. 2010 Nov;104(11):1654-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Paula Kauppi
Paula Salo
Riina Hakola
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Tari Haahtela
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. paula.kauppi@hus.fi
Source
Respir Med. 2010 Nov;104(11):1654-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - economics - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - economics - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study is to examine the risk of sickness absence in public sector employees with allergic rhinitis or asthma or both conditions combined. This is a prospective cohort study of 48,296 Finnish public sector employees. Data from self-reported rhinitis and asthma were obtained from survey responses given during either the 2000-2002 or 2004 periods. Follow-up data on sickness absences for the public sector employees surveyed were acquired from records kept by the employers. During the follow-up, mean sick leave days per year for respondents were 17.6 days for rhinitis alone, 23.8 days for asthma alone and 24.2 days for both conditions combined. Respondents with neither condition were absent for a mean of 14.5 days annually. The impact of asthma and rhinitis combined on the risk of sick leave days was marginal compared to asthma alone (RR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.3). In the subgroup analysis (those with current asthma or allergy medication), the risk ratio for medically certified sickness absence (>3 days) was 2.0 (95% CI 1.9-2.2) for those with asthma and rhinitis combined. Rhinitis, asthma and both these conditions combined increased the risk of days off work.
PubMed ID
20542677 View in PubMed
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Association of physical activity with future mental health in older, mid-life and younger women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263892
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Oct;24(5):813-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Amanda Griffiths
Anne Kouvonen
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Ari Väänänen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Oct;24(5):813-8
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental ill-health, particularly depression and anxiety, is a leading and increasing cause of disability worldwide, especially for women.
We examined the prospective association between physical activity and symptoms of mental ill-health in younger, mid-life and older working women. Participants were 26 913 women from the ongoing cohort Finnish Public Sector Study with complete data at two phases, excluding those who screened positive for mental ill-health at baseline. Mental health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Self-reported physical activity was expressed in metabolic equivalent task (MET) hours per week. Logistic regression models were used to analyse associations between physical activity levels and subsequent mental health.
There was an inverse dose-response relationship between physical activity and future symptoms of mental ill-health. This association is consistent with a protective effect of physical activity and remained after adjustments for socio-demographic, work-related and lifestyle factors, health and body mass index. Furthermore, those mid-life and older women who reported increased physical activity by more than 2 MET hours per week demonstrated a reduced risk of later mental ill-health in comparison with those who did not increase physical activity. This protective effect of increased physical activity did not hold for younger women.
This study adds to the evidence for the protective effect of physical activity for later mental health in women. It also suggests that increasing physical activity levels may be beneficial in terms of mental health among mid-life and older women. The alleviation of menopausal symptoms may partly explain age effects but further research is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24532567 View in PubMed
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Associations of traffic noise with self-rated health and psychotropic medication use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258854
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 May 1;40(3):235-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2014
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Timo Lanki
Tarja Yli-Tuomi
Anu W Turunen
Jaana Pentti
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 May 1;40(3):235-43
Date
May-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Automobile Driving
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise
Prospective Studies
Self-Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
Road traffic noise is a common environmental nuisance, which has been thought to increase the risk of many types of health problems. However, population-level evidence often remains scarce. This study examined whether road traffic noise is associated with self-rated health and use of psychotropic medication in a cohort of public sector employees.
Data are from the Finnish Public Sector Study cohort. Geographical information system (GIS) was used to link modeled outdoor road traffic noise levels (L den) to residential addresses of 15 611 men and women with cross-sectional survey responses on self-rated health and register-based information on the use of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics. High trait anxiety scores were used to identify potentially vulnerable individuals. The analyses were run with logistic regression models adjusting for individual and area-level variables. All participants were blind to the aim of the study.
Mean level of road traffic noise at participants' home addresses was 52 decibels (dB) (standard deviation 8.1). Noise level >60 dB versus =45 dB was associated with poor self-rated health in men [odds ratio (OR) 1.58, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.14-2.21]. Further stratification revealed that the association was evident only among men with high trait anxiety scores (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.28-3.89). No association was found with psychotropic medication use or among women.
Exposure to road traffic noise was not associated with increased use of psychotropic medication, although it was associated with weakened self-rated health among men.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 May 1;40(3):211-324668139
PubMed ID
24788851 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of Social Networks and Mortality Risk: Evidence From 2 Prospective Cohort Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300405
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 187(4):746-753
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-01-2018
Author
Maarit Kauppi
Ichiro Kawachi
George David Batty
Tuula Oksanen
Marko Elovainio
Jaana Pentti
Ville Aalto
Marianna Virtanen
Markku Koskenvuo
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku and Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 187(4):746-753
Date
04-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Networking
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The size of a person's social network is linked to health and longevity, but it is unclear whether the number of strong social ties or the number of weak social ties is most influential for health. We examined social network characteristics as predictors of mortality in the Finnish Public Sector Study (n = 7,617) and the Health and Social Support Study (n = 20,816). Social network characteristics were surveyed at baseline in 1998. Information about mortality was obtained from the Finnish National Death Registry. During a mean follow-up period of 16 years, participants with a small social network (=10 members) were more likely to die than those with a large social network (=21 members) (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.46). Mortality risk was increased among participants with both a small number of strong ties (=2 members) and a small number of weak ties (=5 members) (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.26, 1.79) and among participants with both a large number of strong ties and a small number of weak ties (HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.52), but not among those with a small number of strong ties and a large number of weak ties (HR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.25). These findings suggest that in terms of mortality risk, the number of weak ties may be an important component of social networks.
PubMed ID
29020140 View in PubMed
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Chronic workplace stress and insufficient physical activity: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120339
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jan;70(1):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Anne Kouvonen
Jussi Vahtera
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Ari K P Väänänen
Tarja Heponiemi
Paula Salo
Marianna Virtanen
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
School of Sociology, Social Policy & Social Work, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK and Centre of Excellence for Public Health (NI), Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK. a.kouvonen@qub.ac.uk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jan;70(1):3-8
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Employment
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Prospective Studies
Reward
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workplace
Abstract
To examine whether exposure to workplace stressors predicts changes in physical activity and the risk of insufficient physical activity.
Prospective data from the Finnish Public Sector Study. Repeated exposure to low job control, high job demands, low effort, low rewards and compositions of these (job strain and effort-reward imbalance) were assessed at Time 1 (2000-2002) and Time 2 (2004). Insufficient physical activity (
PubMed ID
23014593 View in PubMed
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Contribution of early and adult factors to socioeconomic variation in blood pressure: thirty-four-year follow-up study of school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180980
Source
Psychosom Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;66(2):184-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Marja-Liisa Kinnunen
Tuuli Pitkänen
Jussi Vahtera
Marko Elovainio
Lea Pulkkinen
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. mika.kivimaki@ttl.fi
Source
Psychosom Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;66(2):184-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Child
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parents
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Social Class
Abstract
To prospectively examine the role of childhood and adulthood factors in the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and adult systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP).
One hundred and five boys and 101 girls who were 8 years of age at entry into the study were observed for 34 years in the Jyväskylä Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development, Finland. Data were gathered on educational attainment and occupational status, as indicators of SES, and potential explanatory factors related to 0, (14), 27, 36, and 42 years of age. SBP and DBP were assessed at 15 and 42 years of age.
In a structural equation model adjusted for sex and childhood SBP, educational attainment was inversely associated with adult SBP (structural coefficient -0.17, p
Notes
Erratum In: Psychosom Med. 2004 May-Jun;66(3):3b
PubMed ID
15039502 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does depression predict coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease equally well? The Health and Social Support Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144529
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;39(4):1016-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Hermann Nabi
Mika Kivimäki
Sakari Suominen
Markku Koskenvuo
Archana Singh-Manoux
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
INSERM U687-IFR69, Villejuif, France. hermann.nabi@inserm.fr
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;39(4):1016-24
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - complications
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship between depression and cerebrovascular disease (CBVD) continues to be debated although little research has compared the predictive power of depression for coronary heart disease (CHD) with that for CBVD within the same population. This study aimed to compare the importance of depression for CHD and CBVD within the same population of adults free of apparent cardiovascular disease.
A random sample of 23,282 adults (9507 men, 13,775 women) aged 20-54 years were followed up for 7 years. Fatal and first non-fatal CHD and CBVD events were documented by linkage to the National-hospital-discharge and mortality registers.
Sex-age-education-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for CHD was 1.66 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24-2.24] for participants with mild to severe depressive symptoms, i.e. those scoring > or =10 on the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory, and 2.04 (1.27-3.27) for those who filled antidepressant prescriptions compared with those without depression markers in 1998, i.e. at study baseline. For CBVD, the corresponding HRs were 1.01 (0.67-1.53) and 1.77 (0.95-3.29). After adjustment for behavioural and biological risk factors these associations were reduced but remained evident for CHD, the adjusted HRs being 1.47 (1.08-1.99) and 1.72 (1.06-2.77). For CBVD, the corresponding multivariable adjusted HRs were 0.87 (0.57-1.32) and 1.52 (0.81-2.84).
Self-reported depression using a standardized questionnaire and clinical markers of mild to severe depression were associated with an increased risk for CHD. There was no clear evidence that depression is a risk factor for CBVD, but this needs further confirmation.
Notes
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Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;39(4):1025-620511335
PubMed ID
20360321 View in PubMed
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Does perceived work ability improve after a multidisciplinary preventive program in a population with no severe medical problems? The Finnish Public Sector Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125186
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Jan;39(1):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Mikhail Saltychev
Katri Laimi
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. mikhail.saltychev@gmail.com
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Jan;39(1):57-65
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Perception
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Propensity Score
Prospective Studies
Public Sector
Rehabilitation, Vocational - methods - psychology
Sick Leave
Abstract
This study examines the short- and long-term effects of a multidisciplinary preventive program on perceived work ability in a population with no severe medical problems.
Altogether 859 public sector employees who participated in the program in 1997-2005 and their 2426 propensity-score-matched controls were studied prospectively. Propensity scores for probability of being granted participation in the program were calculated based on the data on health, health-risk behaviors, and work-related characteristics that were gathered from repeat responses to a survey, national health registers, and employers' records. Mean scores of perceived work ability (PWA) and prevalence ratios (PR) of suboptimal PWA were calculated after a short-term (mean 1.7 years, up to 4.6 years) and a long-term (mean 5.8 years, up to 9.2 years) follow-up.
No beneficial effects were observed with respect to work ability. In comparison to controls, the participants' risk of suboptimal PWA was actually slightly higher after both the short-term [PR 1.23, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.10-1.39] and long-term (PR 1.18, 95% CI 1.06-1.31) follow-ups.
These data suggest that the vocationally oriented multidisciplinary preventive program was ineffective in improving work ability among participants with no severe medical problems.
PubMed ID
22508527 View in PubMed
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Do pre-employment influences explain the association between psychosocial factors at work and coronary heart disease? The Whitehall II study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148046
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 May;67(5):330-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Taina Hintsa
Martin J Shipley
David Gimeno
Marko Elovainio
Tarani Chandola
Markus Jokela
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Jussi Vahtera
Michael G Marmot
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 9, Helsinki, FIN-00014, Finland. taina.hintsa@helsinkifigi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 May;67(5):330-4
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Height
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Family Health
Finland - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
United States - epidemiology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To examine whether the association between psychosocial factors at work and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) is explained by pre-employment factors, such as family history of CHD, education, paternal education and social class, number of siblings and height.
A prospective cohort study of 6435 British men aged 35-55 years at phase 1 (1985-1988) and free from prevalent CHD at phase 2 (1989-1990) was conducted. Psychosocial factors at work were assessed at phases 1 and 2 and mean scores across the two phases were used to determine long-term exposure. Selected pre-employment factors were assessed at phase 1. Follow-up for coronary death, first non-fatal myocardial infarction or definite angina between phase 2 and 1999 was based on clinical records (250 events, follow-up 8.7 years).
The selected pre-employment factors were associated with risk for CHD: HRs (95% CI) were 1.33 (1.03 to 1.73) for family history of CHD, 1.18 (1.05 to 1.32) for each quartile decrease in height and 1.16 (0.99 to 1.35) for each category increase in number of siblings. Psychosocial work factors also predicted CHD: 1.72 (1.08 to 2.74) for low job control and 1.72 (1.10 to 2.67) for low organisational justice. Adjustment for pre-employment factors changed these associations by 4.1% or less.
In this occupational cohort of British men, the association between psychosocial factors at work and CHD was largely independent of family history of CHD, education, paternal educational attainment and social class, number of siblings and height.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19819857 View in PubMed
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Do psychological attributes matter for adherence to antihypertensive medication? The Finnish Public Sector Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154722
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Nov;26(11):2236-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Hermann Nabi
Jussi Vahtera
Archana Singh-Manoux
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
David Gimeno
Marko Elovainio
Marianna Virtanen
Timo Klaukka
Mika Kivimaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. H.Nabi@public-health.ucl.ac.uk
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Nov;26(11):2236-43
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Treatment Refusal - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Psychological factors may be important determinants of adherence to antihypertensive medication, as they have been repeatedly found to be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and health-damaging behaviours. We examined the importance of several psychological attributes (sense of coherence, optimism, pessimism, hostility, anxiety) with regard to antihypertensive medication adherence assessed by pharmacy refill records.
A total of 1021 hypertensive participants, aged 26-63 years, who were employees in eight towns and 12 hospitals in Finland were included in the analyses.
We found 60% of patients to be totally adherent, 36% partially adherent, and 4% totally nonadherent. Multinomial regression analyses revealed high sense of coherence to be associated with lower odds of being totally nonadherent in contrast of being totally adherent (odds ratio=0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.96). This association was independent of factors that influenced adherence to antihypertensive medication, such as sociodemographic characteristics, health-related behaviours, self-reported medical history of doctor-diagnosed comorbidity, and anteriority of hypertension status. The association was not specific to certain types of antihypertensive drugs.
High sense of coherence may influence antihypertensive medication-adherence behaviour. Aspects characterizing this psychological attribute, such as knowledge (comprehensibility), capacity (manageability), and motivation (meaningfulness) may be important determinants of adherence behaviour for asymptomatic illnesses, such as hypertension, in which patients often do not feel or perceive the immediate consequences of skipping medication doses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18854766 View in PubMed
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