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17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2: independent prognostic significance and evidence of estrogen protection in female patients with colon cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18039
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Olayiwola O Oduwole
Markus J Mäkinen
Veli V Isomaa
Anitta Pulkka
Petra Jernvall
Tuomo J Karttunen
Pirkko T Vihko
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu, Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research on Reproductive Health, P.O. Box 5000, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics - pathology
Comparative Study
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Isoenzymes - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
The mRNA expression of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) types 1 and 2 enzymes catalyzing opposite reaction of estrogen metabolism was investigated in colon cancer. Further, the significance of the 17HSD type 2 enzyme as a possible marker of colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis was studied. In the normal mucosa, 17HSD type 2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in the surface epithelium and in the upper parts of the crypts. In the lamina propria expression was seen in endothelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes. In colorectal tumors, 17HSD type 2 expression was in most cases downregulated. Female patients had significantly more cancers with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression (n=11/35; 31%) than male patients (n=3/39; 8%) (P=0.02). We observed a significant impact of 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression on survival in female patients with distal colorectal cancer (n=24), with an overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of 54% in those with low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression. None of the female patients with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression survived (n=11; P=0.0068; log rank 7.32). In male patients, no significant association with survival was observed. Our data provide evidence suggesting that low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression is an independent marker of favorable prognosis in females with distal colorectal cancer, supporting the presence of gender- and location-related differences in the pathogenesis of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
14672733 View in PubMed
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5993 survivors of suspected myocardial infarction. 10 year incidence of later myocardial infarction and subsequent mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54402
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):564-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
S. Galatius
J. Launbjerg
L S Mortensen
J F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine B. National University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):564-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Care Units
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate the 10-year incidence of later infarction and subsequent mortality, as well as predictors of later infarction, in patients with suspected myocardial infarction and alive on day 15 after admission. METHODS AND RESULTS: 5993 patients admitted with suspected myocardial infarction and alive on day 15 after admission were registered in The First Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial database in 1979-81. 2586 had definite infarction, 402 probable infarction and 3005 no infarction as they fulfilled 3, 2 and 1 criteria for infarction. They were followed for 10 years with respect to later infarction and death, i.e., including death after later infarction. The 10 year infarction rate after index admission was 48.8% in definite, 47.3% in probable and 24.6% in no infarction patients (P 65 years with definite or probable infarction. CONCLUSION: The 10-year infarction rate in patients with suspected myocardial infarction in whom the diagnosis is ruled out is lower than in those with definite or probable infarction, but the mortality after a later infarction is similar in all three groups.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):534-59597397
PubMed ID
9597404 View in PubMed
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The absence of immunoreactivity for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), but not for TIMP-2, protein is associated with a favorable prognosis in aggressive breast carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16897
Source
Oncology. 2005;68(2-3):196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Paula Kuvaja
Anne Talvensaari-Mattila
Paavo Pääkkö
Taina Turpeenniemi-Hujanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Oncology. 2005;68(2-3):196-203
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology - pathology
Carcinoma - enzymology - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 - analysis - immunology
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 - analysis - immunology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: High tumor grade and lymph node positivity are associated with poor prognosis in breast carcinoma. Prognostic markers are used to define which patient groups benefit from different treatment modalities, some of which are potentially very toxic. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix, and type IV collagenases MMP-2 and -9 have been linked to invasive behavior of several malignancies. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) -1 and -2 inhibit their activity and are therefore considered to have an inhibitory effect on tumor progression. The role of TIMPs in progression of breast carcinoma is, however, still poorly known. Here the effect of TIMP-1 and -2 on survival was examined in lymph node-positive breast carcinoma patients. METHODS: TIMP-1 or -2 was evaluated with avidin-biotin immunohistochemical staining from paraffin-embedded sections of primary breast carcinoma of 132 cases. RESULTS: Positive staining for TIMP-1 and -2 was observed in 81 and 84% of the tumors respectively. TIMP-1 correlated to the grade of the tumor (p = 0.047). Absence of TIMP-1 protein correlated with favorable disease-specific survival of the patients with high-grade tumors. After 10 years of follow-up as high as 88% of patients with a grade 2-3, but TIMP-1-negative tumor were alive, when only 61% of the TIMP-1-positive cases in this group survived by that time (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that lack of TIMP-1 protein expression is associated with a favorable prognosis in patients with node-positive high-grade breast carcinoma.
PubMed ID
16006757 View in PubMed
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Age at onset and familial risk for major depression in a Swedish national twin sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76508
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Nov;35(11):1573-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Kendler Kenneth S
Gatz Margaret
Gardner Charles O
Pedersen Nancy L
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0126, USA. kendler@hsc.vcu.edu
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Nov;35(11):1573-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In many biomedical disorders, early age at onset (AAO) is an index of high liability to illness which is manifest by an increased risk of illness in relatives. Most but not all prior studies report such a pattern for major depression (MD). METHOD: Lifetime MD and AAO were assessed at personal interview using modified DSM-III-R criteria in 13864 twin pairs, including 4229 onsets of MD, from the Swedish National Twin Registry. Analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: Controlling for year of birth, gender, zygosity, co-twin history of MD and the interaction of zygosity and co-twin history, the best-fit model showed a significant main effect and a quadratic effect of AAO of MD in the co-twin on the log hazard ratio for MD in the index twin. When examined together, these effects predicted that from the ages of 15 to approximately 35 years, AAO of MD is moderately negatively related to risk of illness in relatives. However, past age 35, the function flattens out, with little change of risk in relatives with further increases of AAO. Even when the co-twin had a late AAO, the risk in the index twin substantially exceeded that seen when the co-twin had no history of MD. CONCLUSION: In this large sample, AAO is a meaningful, albeit modest, index of familial liability to MD. The relationship is nonlinear and results largely from an increased liability in individuals with an early AAO. These results should be interpreted in the context of the limitations of long-term recall.
PubMed ID
16219115 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and postmenopausal breast cancer risk defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9088
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 2;97(21):1601-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-2005
Author
Reiko Suzuki
Weimin Ye
Tove Rylander-Rudqvist
Shigehira Saji
Graham A Colditz
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 2;97(21):1601-8
Date
Nov-2-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - chemistry - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Mammography
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Postmenopause
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Estrogen - analysis
Receptors, Progesterone - analysis
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alcohol intake has been reported to be positively associated with an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer; however, the association with the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of the breast tumors remains unclear. METHODS: Self-reported data on alcohol consumption were collected in 1987 and 1997 from 51,847 postmenopausal women in the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. Through June 30, 2004, 1188 invasive breast cancer case patients with known ER and PR status were identified during an average 8.3-year follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable relative risks (RRs) of breast cancer, adjusting for age; family history of breast cancer; body mass index; height; parity; age at menarche, first birth, and menopause; education level; use of postmenopausal hormones; and diet. Heterogeneity among groups was evaluated using the Wald test. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk for the development of ER-positive (+) tumors, irrespective of PR status (highest intake [> or = 10 g of alcohol per day] versus nondrinkers, multivariable RR = 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.80; Ptrend
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 2;97(21):1563-416264173
PubMed ID
16264180 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and incidence of dementia in a community sample aged 75 years and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9856
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;55(10):959-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Wenyong Huang
Chengxuan Qiu
Bengt Winblad
Laura Fratiglioni
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Division of Geriatric Epidemiology and Medicine, Department of Neurotec, Karolinska Institutet and the Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Olivecronas väg 4, Box 6401, S-113 82 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;55(10):959-64
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dementia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the relationship between light to moderate alcohol consumption and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in very old people, a community-based dementia-free cohort (n = 402) was followed for almost 6 years to detect incident dementia using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd Edition-Revised criteria. Data from the entire cohort and a subpopulation of those with baseline Mini-Mental State Examination score > or =24 (n = 317) were analyzed with Cox models. In the entire population, light to moderate drinking was significantly associated with a decreased risk of incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease compared with nondrinking (adjusted relative risk 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.3 to 0.7). In the analysis of the subpopulation, however, the inverse association between light to moderate drinking and risk of incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease was less evident and no longer statistically significant. This study suggested that light to moderate alcohol drinking might protect against dementia and Alzheimer's disease among old people, although the possibility that such an association may be due to information bias cannot be totally ruled out.
PubMed ID
12464371 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use as predictor for infertility in a representative population of Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9692
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):744-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Susanne Krüger Kjaer
Claus Holst
Heidi Sharif
Christian Munk
Merete Osler
Lone Schmidt
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, and Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Hospital Corporation, Denmark. jst@niph.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):744-9
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Maternal Age
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine the association between use of alcohol and subsequent incidence of primary infertility. METHODS: The study subjects were chosen from a population-based cohort of Danish women aged 20-29 years. Eligible women were nulliparous and not pregnant (n = 7760). Information on alcohol intake and potential confounders (age, education, marital status, diseases in the reproductive organs, and cigarette smoking) was assessed at enrollment. The incidence of fertility problems during follow-up was obtained by record linkage with the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish Infertility Cohort Register. Main outcome measures were hazard ratios of infertility according to alcohol intake at baseline estimated in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 4.9 years, 368 women had experienced infertility. Alcohol intake at baseline was unassociated with infertility among younger women, but was a significant predictor for infertility among women above age 30. In this age group, the adjusted hazard ratio for consuming seven or more drinks per week was 2.26 (95% confidence interval: 1.19-4.32) compared with women consuming less than one drink per week. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that alcohol intake is a predictor for infertility problems among women in the later reproductive age group.
PubMed ID
12848646 View in PubMed
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All-cause mortality and mortality of myocardial infarction for 989 legally castrated men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51783
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(10):863-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Finn Edler von Eyben
Christian Graugaard
Michael Vaeth
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Herning Central Hospital, Herning, Denmark. feve@post5.tele.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(10):863-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Orchiectomy
Poisson Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Male gender is an independent coronary risk factor. METHOD: Long-term follow-up of 989 Danish men who underwent legal castration between 1929 and 1968. RESULTS: The legally castrated men were unmarried and belonged to social class IV and V more often than were Danish men in general. During the follow-up until 2000, 835 of the 989 (85%) castrated men died, including 148 who died of myocardial infarction. In multiple Poisson regression analyses, the men had a standardized mortality rate (SMR) for all-cause mortality of 1.30 (95% CI: 1.26-1.36) and a SMR for mortality of myocardial infarction of 1.08 (95% CI: 1.04-1.16). Thus, the castrated men had a lower proportion of deaths of myocardial infarction (148/792, 18.7% (95% CI: 16.0-21.6%)) than was expected based on the mortality rates for the Danish male population (136/608, 22.4%). The castrated men had discordant changes for the SMR for all-cause mortality and mortality of myocardial infarction whereas subgroups of the Danish population previously has been found to have concordant changes for the two SMRs. CONCLUSION: The castrated men had fewer deaths of myocardial infarction than expected, so men may not have increased risk of coronary heart disease from unphysiologically low levels of endogenous androgens.
Notes
Erratum In: Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(1):83
PubMed ID
16283477 View in PubMed
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Allergic conditions and risk of hematological malignancies in adults: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15117
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Nov 4;4:51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004
Author
Karin C Söderberg
Lars Hagmar
Judith Schwartzbaum
Maria Feychting
Author Affiliation
The Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Karin.Soderberg@imm.ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Nov 4;4:51
Date
Nov-4-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Hodgkin Disease - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Leukemia - complications - epidemiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Risk
Self Disclosure
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Two contradictory hypotheses have been proposed to explain the relationship between allergic conditions and malignancies, the immune surveillance hypothesis and the antigenic stimulation hypothesis. The former advocates that allergic conditions may be protective against development of cancer, whereas the latter proposes an increased risk. This relationship has been studied in several case-control studies, but only in a few cohort studies. METHODS: The association between allergic conditions and risk of developing leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and myeloma was investigated in a cohort of 16,539 Swedish twins born 1886-1925. Prospectively collected, self-reported information about allergic conditions such as asthma, hay fever or eczema was obtained through questionnaires administered in 1967. The cohort was followed 1969-99 and cancer incidence was ascertained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. RESULTS: Hives and asthma tended to increase the risk of leukemia (relative risk [RR] = 2.1, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.0-4.5 and RR = 1.6, 95% CI 0.8-3.5, respectively). There was also an indication of an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with eczema during childhood (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.3). CONCLUSION: In contrast to most previous studies, our results do not indicate a protective effect of allergic conditions on the risk of developing hematological malignancies. Rather, they suggest that allergic conditions might increase the risk of some hematological malignancies.
PubMed ID
15527506 View in PubMed
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360 records – page 1 of 36.