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1,3-Butadiene and leukemia among synthetic rubber industry workers: exposure-response relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166384
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Hong Cheng
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Birmingham, AL, USA. hcheng@ms.soph.uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens - chemical synthesis - chemistry - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Dimethyldithiocarbamate - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphoid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous research updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers during the period 1944-1998, determined if leukemia and other cancers were associated with several employment factors and carried out Poisson regression analysis to examine exposure-response associations between estimated exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) or other chemicals and cancer. The present study used Cox regression procedures to examine further the exposure-response relationship between several unlagged and lagged, continuous, time-dependent BD exposure indices (BD parts per million (ppm)-years, the total number of exposures to BD concentrations >100 ppm ("peaks") and average intensity of BD) and leukemia, lymphoid neoplasms and myeloid neoplasms. All three BD exposure indices were associated positively with leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (beta) from an analysis that controlled only for age was 2.9 x 10(-4) (p
PubMed ID
17123495 View in PubMed
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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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5-Alpha reductase inhibitor use and prostate cancer survival in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275383
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 15;138(12):2820-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2016
Author
Teemu J Murtola
Elina K Karppa
Kimmo Taari
Kirsi Talala
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 15;138(12):2820-8
Date
Jun-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Early Detection of Cancer
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Abstract
Randomized clinical trials have shown that use of 5a-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) lowers overall prostate cancer (PCa) risk compared to placebo, while the proportion of Gleason 8-10 tumors is elevated. It is unknown whether this affects PCa-specific survival. We studied disease-specific survival by 5-ARI usage in a cohort of 6,537 prostate cancer cases diagnosed in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial and linked to the national prescription database for information on medication use. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prostate cancer-specific deaths. For comparison, survival among alpha-blocker users was also evaluated. During the median follow-up of 7.5 years after diagnosis a total of 2,478 men died; 617 due to prostate cancer and 1,861 due to other causes. The risk of prostate cancer death did not differ between 5-ARI users and nonusers (multivariable adjusted HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.72-1.24 and HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.69-1.41 for usage before and after the diagnosis, respectively). Alpha-blocker usage both before and after diagnosis was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.08-1.54 and HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.30-1.86, respectively). The risk increase vanished in long-term alpha-blocker usage. Use of 5-ARIs does not appear to affect prostate cancer mortality when used in management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Increased risk associated with alpha-blocker usage should prompt further exploration on the prognostic role of lower urinary tract symptoms.
PubMed ID
26804670 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of users of benzodiazepine: starting with diazepam versus oxazepam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282849
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ingunn Fride Tvete
Trine Bjørner
Tor Skomedal
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diazepam - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oxazepam - therapeutic use
Prescription Drug Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Drug dependency may develop during long-term benzodiazepine use, indicated, for example, by dose escalation. The first benzodiazepine chosen may affect the risk of dose escalation.
To detect possible differences in benzodiazepine use between new users of diazepam and oxazepam over time.
This 5-year prescription database study included 19 747 new benzodiazepine users, inhabitants of Norway, aged 30-60 years, with first redemption for diazepam or oxazepam.
Individuals starting on diazepam versus oxazepam were analysed by logistic regression with sex, age, other drug redemptions, prescriber's specialty, household income, education level, type of work, and vocational rehabilitation support as background variables. Time to reach a daily average intake of =1 defined daily doses (DDD) over a 3-month period was analysed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model.
New users of oxazepam had a higher risk for dose escalation compared with new users of diazepam. This was true even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 1.51).
Most doctors prescribed, according to recommendations, oxazepam to individuals they may have regarded as prone to and at risk of dependency. However, these individuals were at higher risk for dose escalation even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use. Differences between the two user groups could be explained by different preferences for starting drug, DDD for oxazepam being possibly too low, and some unaccounted differences in illness.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26965028 View in PubMed
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A 5-year prospective assessment of the risk associated with individual benzodiazepines and doses in new elderly users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176448
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Feb;53(2):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Robyn Tamblyn
Michal Abrahamowicz
Roxane du Berger
Peter McLeod
Gillian Bartlett
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. robyn.tamblyn@mcgill.ca
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Feb;53(2):233-41
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Half-Life
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the risk of injury associated with the new use of individual benzodiazepines and dosage regimens in the elderly.
Prospective database cohort study with 5 years of follow-up.
Quebec, Canada.
Two hundred fifty-three thousand two hundred forty-four persons aged 65 and older who were nonusers of benzodiazepines in the year before follow-up.
Population-based hospitalization and prescription and medical services claims databases were used to compare the risk of injury during periods of benzodiazepine use with those of nonuse. Periods of use were measured for 10 insured benzodiazepines by drug and dose as time-dependent covariates. Injury was defined as the first occurrence of a nonvertebral fracture, soft-tissue injury, or accident-related hospital admission. Patient age, sex, previous injury history, concomitant medication use, and comorbidity were measured as fixed and time-dependent confounders. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the risk of injury with benzodiazepine use and to determine the extent to which patient characteristics, differences in dosage, or in the effect of increasing dosage for individual drugs explained differences between drugs.
More than one-quarter (27.6%) of 253,244 elderly were dispensed at least one prescription for a benzodiazepine, and 17.7% of elderly were treated for at least one injury during follow-up, of which fractures were the most common. Patient characteristics, systematic differences in the risk of injury in elderly prescribed different benzodiazepines, and differences in dosage prescribed for individual drugs confounded the risk of injury with benzodiazepine use. The risk of injury with increasing dosage varied by drug from a hazard ratio of 0.92 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.60, 1.42) for alprazolam to 2.20 (95% CI=1.39, 3.47) for flurazepam per 1 standardized adult dose increase.
The risk of injury varied by benzodiazepine, independent of half-life, as did the risk associated with increasing dosage for individual products. Higher doses of oxazepam, flurazepam, and chlordiazepoxide are associated with the greatest risk of injury in the elderly.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2005 Jul-Aug;143(1):2415989312
PubMed ID
15673346 View in PubMed
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A 7-year prospective study of sense of humor and mortality in an adult county population: the HUNT-2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140723
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sven Svebak
Solfrid Romundstad
Jostein Holmen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sven.svebak@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Wit and Humor as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To prospectively explore the significance of sense of humor for survival over 7 years in an adult county population.
Residents in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, aged 20 and older, were invited to take part in a public health survey during 1995-97 (HUNT-2), and 66,140 (71.2 %) participated. Sense of humor was estimated by responses to a cognitive (N = 53,546), social (N = 52,198), and affective (N = 53,132) item, respectively, taken from the Sense of Humor Questionnaire (SHQ). Sum scores were tested by Cox survival regression analyses applied to gender, age, and subjective health.
Hazard ratios were reduced with sense of humor (continuous scale: HR = 0.73; high versus low by median split: HR = 0.50) as contrasted with increase of HR with a number of classical risk factors (e.g., cardiovascular disease: HR = 6.28; diabetes: HR = 4.86; cancer: HR = 4.18; poor subjective health: HR = 2.89). Gender proved to be of trivial importance to the effect of sense of humor in survival. Subjective health correlated positively with sense of humor and therefore might have presented a spurious relation of survival with humor, but sense of humor proved to reduce HR both in individuals with poor and good subjective health. However, above age 65 the effect of sense of humor on survival became less evident.
Sense of humor appeared to increase the probability of survival into retirement, and this effect appeared independent of subjective health. Age under 65 mediated this effect, whereas it disappeared beyond this age.
PubMed ID
20848871 View in PubMed
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10-year experience with I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital: results for 1,100 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141809
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Aug 1;80(5):1323-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2011
Author
Juanita Crook
Jette Borg
Andrew Evans
Ants Toi
E P Saibishkumar
Sharon Fung
Clement Ma
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jcrook@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Aug 1;80(5):1323-9
Date
Aug-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brachytherapy - adverse effects - methods
Disease-Free Survival
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Penile Erection - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Prostate
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Radiotherapy Dosage
Urination Disorders - drug therapy
Abstract
To report outcomes for 1,111 men treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy (BT) at a single institution.
A total of 1,111 men (median age, 63) were treated with iodine-125 prostate BT for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between March 1999 and November 2008. Median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 5.4 ng/ml (range, 0.9-26.1). T stage was T1c in 66% and T2 in 34% of patients. Gleason score was 6 in 90.1% and 7 or 8 in 9.9% of patients. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (2-6 months course) was used in 10.1% of patients and combined external radiotherapy (45 Gy) with BT (110 Gy) in 4.1% (n = 46) of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards were used to determine predictors of failure.
Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 6-114), but for biochemical freedom from relapse, a minimum PSA test follow-up of 30 months was required (median 54; n = 776). There were 27 failures, yielding an actuarial 7-year disease-free survival rate of 95.2% (96 at risk beyond 84 months). All failures underwent repeat 12-core transrectal ultrasound -guided biopsies, confirming 8 local failures. On multivariate analysis, Gleason score was the only independent predictor of failure (p = 0.001; hazard ratio, 4.8 (1.9-12.4). Median International Prostate Symptom score from 12 to 108 months ranged between 3 and 9. Of the men reporting baseline potency, 82.8% retained satisfactory erectile function beyond 5 years.
Iodine-125 prostate BT is a highly effective treatment option for favorable- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and is associated with maintenance of good urinary and erectile functions.
PubMed ID
20675072 View in PubMed
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11-year follow-up of mortality in patients with schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study (FIN11 study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149701
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2009
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Leo Niskanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Date
Aug-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Clozapine - adverse effects
Dibenzothiazepines - adverse effects
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perphenazine - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The introduction of second-generation antipsychotic drugs during the 1990s is widely believed to have adversely affected mortality of patients with schizophrenia. Our aim was to establish the long-term contribution of antipsychotic drugs to mortality in such patients.
Nationwide registers in Finland were used to compare the cause-specific mortality in 66 881 patients versus the total population (5.2 million) between 1996, and 2006, and to link these data with the use of antipsychotic drugs. We measured the all-cause mortality of patients with schizophrenia in outpatient care during current and cumulative exposure to any antipsychotic drug versus no use of these drugs, and exposure to the six most frequently used antipsychotic drugs compared with perphenazine use.
Although the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs rose from 13% to 64% during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 (25 years), and 2006 (22.5 years). Compared with current use of perphenazine, the highest risk for overall mortality was recorded for quetiapine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82), and the lowest risk for clozapine (0.74, 0.60-0.91; p=0.0045 for the difference between clozapine vs perphenazine, and p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897117
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897118
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):590-219595448
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897121
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897120
PubMed ID
19595447 View in PubMed
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14-year diabetes incidence: the role of socio-economic status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139840
Source
Health Rep. 2010 Sep;21(3):19-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Nancy A Ross
Heather Gilmour
Kaberi Dasgupta
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6, Canada. Nancy.Ross@mcgill.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2010 Sep;21(3):19-28
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Algorithms
Canada - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Income
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Diabetes prevalence is associated with low socioeconomic status (SES), but less is known about the relationship between SES and diabetes incidence.
Data from eight cycles of the National Population Health Survey (1994/1995 through 2008/2009) are used. A sample of 5,547 women and 6,786 men aged 18 or older who did not have diabetes in 1994/1995 was followed to determine if household income and educational attainment were associated with increased risk of diagnosis of or death from diabetes by 2008/2009. Three proportional hazards models were applied for income and for education--for men, for women and for both sexes combined. Independent variables were measured at baseline (1994/1995). Diabetes diagnosis was assessed by self-report of diagnosis by a health professional. Diabetes death was based on ICD-10 codes E10-E14.
Among people aged 18 or older in 1994/1995 who were free of diabetes, 7.2% of men and 6.3% of women had developed or died from the disease by 2008/2009. Lower-income women were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than were those in high-income households. This association was attenuated, but not eliminated, by ethno-cultural background and obesity/overweight. Associations with lower educational attainment in unadjusted models were almost completely mediated by demographic and behavioural variables.
Social gradients in diabetes incidence cannot be explained entirely by demographic and behavioural variables.
PubMed ID
20973430 View in PubMed
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17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2: independent prognostic significance and evidence of estrogen protection in female patients with colon cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18039
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Olayiwola O Oduwole
Markus J Mäkinen
Veli V Isomaa
Anitta Pulkka
Petra Jernvall
Tuomo J Karttunen
Pirkko T Vihko
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu, Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research on Reproductive Health, P.O. Box 5000, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics - pathology
Comparative Study
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Isoenzymes - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
The mRNA expression of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) types 1 and 2 enzymes catalyzing opposite reaction of estrogen metabolism was investigated in colon cancer. Further, the significance of the 17HSD type 2 enzyme as a possible marker of colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis was studied. In the normal mucosa, 17HSD type 2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in the surface epithelium and in the upper parts of the crypts. In the lamina propria expression was seen in endothelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes. In colorectal tumors, 17HSD type 2 expression was in most cases downregulated. Female patients had significantly more cancers with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression (n=11/35; 31%) than male patients (n=3/39; 8%) (P=0.02). We observed a significant impact of 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression on survival in female patients with distal colorectal cancer (n=24), with an overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of 54% in those with low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression. None of the female patients with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression survived (n=11; P=0.0068; log rank 7.32). In male patients, no significant association with survival was observed. Our data provide evidence suggesting that low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression is an independent marker of favorable prognosis in females with distal colorectal cancer, supporting the presence of gender- and location-related differences in the pathogenesis of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
14672733 View in PubMed
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4280 records – page 1 of 428.