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4228 records – page 1 of 423.

Big data analysis from Sweden confirms that resting heart rate in late adolescence is significantly associated with incident heart failure and all-cause mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292673
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2018 05 15; 259:220-221
Publication Type
Editorial
Comment
Date
05-15-2018
Author
Polychronis Dilaveris
Dimitrios Tousoulis
Author Affiliation
1st Department of Cardiology, Hippokration General Hospital, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens School of Medicine, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: hrodil1@yahoo.com.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2018 05 15; 259:220-221
Date
05-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Editorial
Comment
Keywords
Adolescent
Heart Failure
Heart rate
Humans
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden
Notes
CommentOn: Int J Cardiol. 2018 May 15;259:109-115 PMID 29579585
PubMed ID
29579605 View in PubMed
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[Counting method for evaluation of possible premature death due to ambient air pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178764
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(6):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
R V Arutiunian
V P Reshetin
V I Kazazian
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(6):27-32
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Humans
Proportional Hazards Models
Russia
Abstract
The authors present evaluation of possible untimely death rate due to ambient air pollution in Russian cities. For evaluation, the authors used data of everyday monitoring of air pollution in 1993 and 1998, carried out by Russian Hydrometeorology Service. Findings are that 219,000-233,000 untimely deaths (or 15-17% of total annual death rate) in Russia could be caused by air pollution. The authors discuss possible factors influencing exactness of the presented evaluation.
PubMed ID
15318455 View in PubMed
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Modelling seasonal and weather dependency of cardiac arrests using the covariate order method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165910
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Jul 30;26(17):3315-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-2007
Author
Jan Terje Kvaløy
Eirik Skogvoll
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway. jan.t.kvaloy@uis.no
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Jul 30;26(17):3315-29
Date
Jul-30-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Service, Hospital
Heart Arrest - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Seasons
Weather
Abstract
A data set concerning cardiac arrests treated by the Emergency Medical Service in Trondheim during a nine year period is analysed. The relationship between the occurrence of cardiac arrest and covariates related to weather and season is examined. The covariate order method is used in the analysis of the data. It is explained how this method can be extended to recurrent event data, and the practical usefulness and flexibility of the method is demonstrated in these analyses. In the analyses a significant relationship between outdoor air temperature, or factors closely related to outdoor air temperature, and the occurrence of cardiac arrest is found. The incidence of cardiac arrest decreases with increasing temperature. Further a significant effect of snowfall is also found, with increased intensity of cardiac arrest on days with snowfall. A more borderline significant effect of precipitation is also identified.
PubMed ID
17195279 View in PubMed
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Accelerated failure time models with covariates subject to measurement error.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164143
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Nov 20;26(26):4817-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2007
Author
Wenqing He
Grace Y Yi
Juan Xiong
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistical and Actuarial Sciences, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ont., Canada N6A 5B7. whe@stats.uwo.ca
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Nov 20;26(26):4817-32
Date
Nov-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Models, Statistical
Ontario
Proportional Hazards Models
Survival Analysis
Abstract
It has been well known that ignoring measurement error may result in substantially biased estimates in many contexts including linear and nonlinear regressions. For survival data with measurement error in covariates there has been extensive discussion in the literature with the focus being on the Cox proportional hazards models. However, the impact of measurement error on accelerated failure time (AFT) models has received little attention, though AFT models are very useful in survival data analysis. In this paper, we discuss AFT models with error-prone covariates and study the bias induced by the naive approach of ignoring measurement error in covariates. To adjust for such a bias, we describe a simulation and extrapolation method. This method is appealing because it is simple to implement and it does not require modelling the true but error-prone covariate process that is often not observable. Asymptotic normality for the resulting estimators is established. Simulation studies are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method as well as the impact of ignoring measurement error in covariates. The proposed method is applied to analyse a data set arising from the Busselton Health study (Australian J. Public Health 1994; 18:129-135).
PubMed ID
17436310 View in PubMed
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Comparison of case-cohort estimators based on data on premature death of adult adoptees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182410
Source
Stat Med. 2003 Dec 30;22(24):3795-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-2003
Author
Liselotte Petersen
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Per Kragh Andersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, DK-1399 Copenhagen K, Denmark. lp@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Stat Med. 2003 Dec 30;22(24):3795-803
Date
Dec-30-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Environment
Genetics
Humans
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Survival Analysis
Abstract
A case-cohort sample of adoptees was collected to investigate genetic and environmental influences on premature death, which motivated us to supplement existing simulation results to explore the performance of various estimators proposed for case-cohort samples of survival data. We studied six regression coefficients estimators, which differ with regard to the weighting scheme used in a pseudo-likelihood function, and two different estimators of their variances. Compared to earlier simulation studies, we changed the following conditions: type of explanatory variable, the distribution of lifetimes, and the percentage of deaths in the full cohort. The latter condition affected the performance of the estimated variances of the regression coefficients, where we found a systematic bias of the estimator, proposed by Self and Prentice, dependent on the percentages of deaths. This dependence of percentages of death was different for different sizes of case-cohort studies. A robust variance estimator showed a better overall performance. The estimators of regression coefficients compared did not differ much, the estimators proposed by Kalbfleisch and Lawless and by Prentice performing very well. Results of the case-cohort data of adoptees were not in conflict with earlier findings of a moderate genetic influence on premature death in adulthood.
PubMed ID
14673939 View in PubMed
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The frequency of alcohol consumption is associated with the stroke mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259934
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2014 Aug;130(2):118-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
S H Rantakömi
S. Kurl
J. Sivenius
J. Kauhanen
J A Laukkanen
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2014 Aug;130(2):118-24
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Stroke - mortality
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the association between the frequency of alcohol consumption and stroke mortality among eastern Finnish men.
This study is a population-based sample of men with an average follow-up of 20.2 years. A total of 2609 men with no history of stroke at baseline participated in the study. During the follow-up, 66 deaths from stroke occurred.
After adjustment for systolic blood pressure, smoking, BMI, diabetes, and socioeconomic status, the relative risk (RR) among men who consumed alcohol 2.5 times per week after adjustment for risk factors. When the total amount of alcohol consumption (g/week) was taken into account with other covariates, RR was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.30-1.68; P = 0.437) for men with alcohol consumption 2.5 times per week compared with nondrinkers, RR was 3.03 (95% CI, 1.19-7.72; P = 0.020).
This study shows a strong association between the frequency of alcohol consumption and stroke mortality, independent of total amount of alcohol consumption. The risk of stroke death was the highest among men who consumed alcohol >2.5 times per week.
PubMed ID
24606050 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(17)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
T. Grove Krause
S. Jakobsen
M. Haarh
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. TGV@ssi.dk
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(17)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Immunization Programs
Information Systems
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Immunisation information systems (IIS) are valuable tools for monitoring vaccination coverage and for estimating vaccine effectiveness and safety. Since 2009, an advanced IIS has been developed in Denmark and will be implemented during 2012–14. This IIS is based on a database existing since 2000. The reporting of all administered vaccinations including vaccinations outside the national programme will become mandatory. Citizens will get access to data about their own vaccinations and healthcare personnel will get access to information on the vaccinations of their patients. A national concept of identification, a national solution combining a personal code and a card with codes, ensures easy and secure access to the register. From the outset, the IIS will include data on childhood vaccinations administered from 1996 and onwards. All Danish citizens have a unique identifier, a so called civil registration number, which allows the linking of information on vaccinations coming from different electronic data sources. The main challenge will be to integrate the IIS with the different electronic patient record systems currently existing at general practitioner, vaccination clinic and hospital level thereby avoiding double-entry. A need has been identified for an updated international classification of vaccine products on the market. Such a classification would also be useful for the future exchange of data on immunisations from IIS between countries.
PubMed ID
22551494 View in PubMed
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Analysing and interpreting competing risk data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167956
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Mar 15;26(6):1360-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2007
Author
Melania Pintilie
Author Affiliation
Ontario Cancer Institute, Clinical Study Coordination and Biostatistics, 610 University Ave, Fl. 15, Rm. 433, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5G 2M9. pintilie@uhnres.utoronto.ca
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Mar 15;26(6):1360-7
Date
Mar-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Causality
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Ontario
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
When competing risks are present, two types of analysis can be performed: modelling the cause specific hazard and modelling the hazard of the subdistribution. This paper contrasts these two methods and presents the benefits of each. The interpretation is specific to the analysis performed. When modelling the cause specific hazard, one performs the analysis under the assumption that the competing risks do not exist. This could be beneficial when, for example, the main interest is whether the treatment works in general. In modelling the hazard of the subdistribution, one incorporates the competing risks in the analysis. This analysis compares the observed incidence of the event of interest between groups. The latter analysis is specific to the structure of the observed data and it can be generalized only to another population with similar competing risks.
Notes
Comment In: Stat Med. 2007 Aug 15;26(18):3521-3; author reply 352317476646
Comment In: Stat Med. 2007 Aug 30;26(19):3676-9; author reply 3679-8017299738
PubMed ID
16900575 View in PubMed
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Disability pension by occupational class--the impact of work-related factors: the Hordaland Health Study Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134122
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:406
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Inger Haukenes
Arnstein Mykletun
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Hans-Tore Hansen
John Gunnar Mæland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, NO-5018 Bergen, Norway. Inger.Haukenes@isf.uib.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:406
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disabled Persons
Employment - classification
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pensions
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
The social gradient in disability pension is well recognized, however mechanisms accounting for the gradient are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between occupational class and subsequent disability pension among middle-aged men and women, and to what extent work-related factors accounted for the association.
A subsample (N = 7031) of the population-based Hordaland Health Study (HUSK) conducted in 1997-99, provided self-reported information on health and work-related factors, and were grouped in four strata by Erikson, Goldthorpe and Portocareros occupational class scheme. The authors obtained follow-up data on disability pension by linking the health survey to national registries of benefit (FD-trygd). They employed Cox regression analysis and adjusted for gender, health (medical conditions, mental health, self-perceived health, somatic symptoms) and work-related factors (working hours, years in current occupation, physical demands, job demands, job control).
A strong gradient in disability pension by occupational class was found. In the fully adjusted model the risk (hazard ratio) ranged from 1.41 (95% CI 0.84 to 2.33) in the routine non-manual class, 1.87 (95% CI 1.07 to 3.27) in the skilled manual class and 2.12 (95% CI 1.14 to 3.95) in the unskilled manual class, employing the administrator and professional class as reference. In the gender and health-adjusted model work-related factors mediated the impact of occupational class on subsequent disability pension with 5% in the routine non-manual class, 26% in the skilled manual class and 24% in the unskilled manual class. The impact of job control and physical demands was modest, and mainly seen among skilled and unskilled manual workers.
Workers in the skilled and unskilled manual classes had a substantial unexplained risk of disability pension. Work-related factors only had a moderate impact on the disability risk. Literature indicates an accumulation of hazards in the manual classes. This should be taken into account when interpreting the gradient in disability pension.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21619716 View in PubMed
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A charitable donation incentive did not increase physician survey response rates in a randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104863
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;67(4):482-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Gihad Nesrallah
Lianne Barnieh
Braden Manns
Catherine Clase
David Mendelssohn
Gordon Guyatt
Author Affiliation
The Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Keenan Research Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5B 1W8, Canada; Department of Nephrology, Humber River Hospital, 200 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario M9N 1N8, Canada. Electronic address: gnesrallah@hrrh.on.ca.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;67(4):482-3
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Canada
Charities
Data Collection - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Physicians - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Reward
PubMed ID
24581299 View in PubMed
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4228 records – page 1 of 423.