Skip header and navigation

Refine By

344 records – page 1 of 35.

A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
Less detail

[10-year experience in oral hygiene and the frequency and differential degree of caries activity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242792
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1982 Nov-Dec;61(6):12-5
Publication Type
Article

1970 preventive dentistry program. Immediate and long-term results of a control program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6316
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):88-90
Publication Type
Article

Adherence to perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis among orthopedic trauma patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139154
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Dec;53(6):367-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kristopher M Lundine
Susan Nelson
Richard Buckley
Sven Putnis
Paul J Duffy
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopaedics, Health Sciences Centre, 3330 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, Alberta. krislundine@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Dec;53(6):367-72
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Canada
Cephalexin - therapeutic use
Female
Fractures, Closed - surgery
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Penicillins - therapeutic use
Perioperative Care - standards
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
The goal of this study was to assess whether patients receive their antibiotic prophylaxis as prescribed. We also investigated what doses and durations of antibiotics are typically ordered, which patients actually receive antibiotics and factors causing the ordered antibiotic regimen to be altered.
We performed a retrospective review of 205 patient charts and sent a national survey to all surgeon members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Trauma Society (COTS) about antibiotic prophylaxis in the setting of surgical treatment for closed fractures.
In all, 93% (179 of 193) of patients received an appropriate preoperative dose of antibiotics, whereas less than 32% (58 of 181) of patients received their postoperative antibiotics as ordered. The most commonly stated reason for patients not receiving their postoperative antibiotics as ordered was patients being discharged before completing 3 postoperative doses. There was a 70% (39 of 56) response rate to the survey sent to COTS surgeons. A single dose of a first-generation cephalosporin preoperatively followed by 3 doses postoperatively is the most common practice among orthopedic trauma surgeons across Canada, but several surgeons give only preoperative prophylaxis.
Adherence to multidose postoperative antibiotic regimens is poor. Meta-analyses have failed to demonstrate the superiority of multidose regimens over single-dose prophylaxis. Single-dose preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis may be a reasonable choice for most orthopedic trauma patients with closed fractures.
Notes
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 Nov;20(11):752-510580626
Cites: J Orthop Trauma. 2008 Apr;22(4):264-918404036
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1999 Dec;(369):124-3810611867
Cites: Circulation. 2000 Jun 27;101(25):2916-2110869263
Cites: Mayo Clin Proc. 2000 Sep;75(9):902-610994825
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2001 Mar;31(3):438-4311260156
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(1):CD00024411279687
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Sep 13;345(11):804-911556301
Cites: Am J Infect Control. 2002 Feb;30(1):49-5611852418
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2003 Jun;51(6):1389-9612746377
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2004 Feb;(419):179-8415021151
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Apr 1;350(14):1422-915070792
Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2004 Jul;86(4):263-615239868
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Oct;13(5):384-715465943
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1983 Jun;(176):258-636851335
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1993 Nov;(296):249-558222434
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Apr 27;347(9009):1133-78609746
Cites: Am J Infect Control. 1999 Apr;27(2):97-132; quiz 133-4; discussion 9610196487
Cites: Am J Health Syst Pharm. 1999 Sep 15;56(18):1839-8810511234
Cites: Arch Surg. 2005 Feb;140(2):174-8215724000
Cites: Am J Surg. 2005 Apr;189(4):395-40415820449
Cites: Orthopedics. 2005 Aug;28(8):749-5116119738
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2006 Jan;90(1):233-6016310532
Cites: J Infus Nurs. 2006 Jan-Feb;29(1):20-716428997
Cites: J Orthop Sci. 2006 Jan;11(1):20-716437344
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2006 Feb;15(1):32-816456207
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Apr;119(4):354.e11-916564780
Cites: Orthopedics. 2006 Apr;29(4):329-39; quiz 340-116628993
Cites: Injury. 2006 May;37 Suppl 2:S74-8016651075
Cites: Drugs. 2006;66(8):1089-10516789794
Cites: Med J Malaysia. 2006 Jun;61(2):181-816898309
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2006 Oct;103(4):908-1217000802
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2006 Nov;90(6):1257-6417116446
Cites: AORN J. 2007 Jan;85(1):173-8017223406
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2007 Mar;57(3 Suppl):13S-18S17349459
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2007 Jul;89(7):1605-1817606802
Cites: Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2007 Sep 15;64(18):1927-3417823104
Cites: Orthopedics. 2007 Nov;30(11):920-418019984
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2008 Jan;61(1):214-817999981
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2008 Feb;90(2):226-3218245579
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 1999 Nov;43(3):195-20210582186
PubMed ID
21092428 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents' experiences of a two-year oral health intervention programme in two Swedish secondary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113112
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
E. Hedman
P. Gabre
D. Birkhed
M. Lepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentisty, Public Dental Health, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Communication
Dental Hygienists
Dental Prophylaxis
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Focus Groups
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oral Health
Patient Participation
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Professional-Patient Relations
School Dentistry
Self Concept
Sweden
Time Factors
Trust
Abstract
To describe adolescents' experiences of participating in a school-based oral health intervention programme for 2 years containing education about oral health and fluoride varnish treatment at the school clinic.
Sixteen adolescents aged 13-16 were interviewed in three focus group sessions. A phenomenographic approach was used for analysis.
The results are presented as three themes and seven descriptive categories. The three themes were 'Seeing the dental hygienist', 'Treatments at the dental hygiene clinic' and 'Education about oral health in class'. The results demonstrate satisfaction with the intervention, such as accessibility, time gain and expanding knowledge. On the other hand, feelings of vulnerability in the treatment sessions were expressed. The fluoride varnish treatment was given both positive and negative reviews. The contact between the participants and the dental hygienist was important, and the opportunity to ask questions about oral health issues was emphasized.
Both positive and negative experiences of the programme were found. Adolescence is a transitional period of life, and for this reason, it is important to create a good working alliance between students and the dental hygienist in future school-based oral health interventions.
PubMed ID
23763634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult diabetic and nondiabetic subjects as users of dental services. A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215505
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Apr;53(2):112-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
L. Pohjamo
T. Tervonen
M. Knuuttila
H. Nurkkala
Author Affiliation
Raahe Health Centre, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Apr;53(2):112-4
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - economics - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis - utilization
Diabetes Mellitus - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Utilization of dental services by 30 diabetic and 30 nondiabetic subjects was assessed by longitudinal monitoring over a period of 3 years. All subjects were examined clinically three times, and their treatment consisted mainly of cariologic and periodontal treatment. The treatment was delivered by a dentist and an expanded-duty dental hygienist. The study groups were similar with regard to the total number of dental visits needed. However, the treatment of diabetic subjects was more demanding in that more dentist's workload was needed for the diabetic group. They also missed more appointments without cancellation and therefore more office time had to be reserved for them.
PubMed ID
7610774 View in PubMed
Less detail

The aetiology of paediatric bloodstream infections changes after pneumococcal vaccination and group B streptococcus prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273598
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2015 Sep;104(9):933-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Joachim Luthander
Rutger Bennet
Christian G Giske
Anna Nilsson
Margareta Eriksson
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2015 Sep;104(9):933-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Bacteremia - microbiology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - microbiology - prevention & control
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Retrospective Studies
Staphylococcus aureus
Streptococcus agalactiae
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Sweden
Abstract
This study explored the incidence and aetiology of bloodstream infections after patients received the pneumococcal conjugate vaccination and a risk-based intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis against early onset sepsis caused by group B streptococcus. We also monitored clinically relevant antimicrobial resistance.
We studied 3986 positive blood cultures from children up to 17?years of age at a paediatric hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, using data from medical records before and after the initiatives, to reduce early onset sepsis, were introduced in 2007 and 2008.
Bloodstream infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae declined by 42% overall (5.6 to 3.2/100?000) and by 62% in previously healthy children under 36?months of age (24.2 to 9.2/100?000). Early onset sepsis caused by group B streptococcus declined by 60% (0.5 to 0.2/1000 live born children). Bacterial meningitis caused by these bacteria decreased by 70%. Staphylococcus aureus and various Gram-negative bacteria became the dominant pathogens, in both previously healthy children and those with underlying disease. Overall, antimicrobial resistance remained low between the two 5-year study periods.
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination and risk-based intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis against group B streptococcus effectively decreased the incidence of bloodstream infections. Empirical antibiotic therapy should target Staphylococcus aureus in?both community and hospital-acquired invasive bacterial infections.
PubMed ID
26060088 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A gap in the welfare. Every other low-income earner skips visits to the dentist--a public health problem is to be expected]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75749
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Mar 8-14;103(10):738-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Björn Klinge
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. Bjorn.Klinge@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Mar 8-14;103(10):738-9
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Health Services - economics
Dental Prophylaxis - economics
Health Policy - economics
Humans
Income
Oral Health
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
16610199 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative: providing preventive services for native people of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245036
Source
Can Dent Hyg. 1981;15(3):69-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
S. Hemming
Source
Can Dent Hyg. 1981;15(3):69-70
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Health Services
Dental Prophylaxis
Humans
Indians, North American
PubMed ID
6945895 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Policy statement: recommendations for the prevention of pneumococcal infections, including the use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar), pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and antibiotic prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5510
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Aug;106(2 Pt 1):362-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Aug;106(2 Pt 1):362-6
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Immunocompetence - immunology
Infant
Meningococcal Vaccines
Opportunistic Infections - immunology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Infections - immunology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Risk factors
Vaccines, Conjugate - administration & dosage - immunology
Abstract
Heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) is recommended for universal use in children 23 months and younger, to be given concurrently with other recommended childhood vaccines at 2, 4, 6, and 12 to 15 months of age. For children 7 to 23 months old who have not received previous doses of PCV7, administration of a reduced number of doses is recommended. Two doses of PCV7 are recommended for children 24 to 59 months old at high risk of invasive pneumococcal infection-including children with functional, anatomic, or congenital asplenia; infection with human immunodeficiency virus; and other predisposing conditions-who have not been immunized previously with PCV7. Recommendations have been made for use of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide (23PS) vaccine in high-risk children to expand serotype coverage. High-risk children should be given vaccines at the earliest possible opportunity. Use of antibiotic prophylaxis in children younger than 5 years with functional or anatomic asplenia, including children with sickle cell disease, continues to be recommended. Children who have not experienced invasive pneumococcal infection and have received recommended pneumococcal immunizations may discontinue prophylaxis after 5 years of age. The safety and efficacy of PCV7 and 23PS in children 24 months or older at moderate or lower risk of invasive pneumococcal infection remain under investigation. Current US Food and Drug Administration indications are for administration of PCV7 only to children younger than 24 months. Data are insufficient to recommend routine administration of PCV7 for children at moderate risk of pneumococcal invasive infection, including all children 24 to 35 months old, children 36 to 59 months old who attend out-of-home care, and children 36 to 59 months old who are of Native American (American Indian and Alaska Native) or African American descent. However, all children 24 to 59 months old, regardless of whether they are at low or moderate risk, may benefit from the administration of pneumococcal immunizations. Therefore, a single dose of PCV7 or 23PS vaccine may be given to children 24 months or older. The 23PS is an acceptable alternative to PCV7, although an enhanced immune response and probable reduction of nasopharyngeal carriage favor the use of PCV7 whenever possible.
PubMed ID
10920169 View in PubMed
Less detail

344 records – page 1 of 35.