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50bp deletion in the promoter for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reduces SOD1 expression in vitro and may correlate with increased age of onset of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156293
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Wendy J Broom
Matthew Greenway
Ghazaleh Sadri-Vakili
Carsten Russ
Kristen E Auwarter
Kelly E Glajch
Nicolas Dupre
Robert J Swingler
Shaun Purcell
Caroline Hayward
Peter C Sapp
Diane McKenna-Yasek
Paul N Valdmanis
Jean-Pierre Bouchard
Vincent Meininger
Betsy A Hosler
Jonathan D Glass
Meraida Polack
Guy A Rouleau
Jang-Ho J Cha
Orla Hardiman
Robert H Brown
Author Affiliation
Day Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. wendy.broom@gmail.com
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Base Sequence
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Homozygote
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Sequence Deletion
Sp1 Transcription Factor - metabolism
Superoxide Dismutase - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to test the hypothesis that a described association between homozygosity for a 50bp deletion in the SOD1 promoter 1684bp upstream of the SOD1 ATG and an increased age of onset in SALS can be replicated in additional SALS and control sample sets from other populations. Our second objective was to examine whether this deletion attenuates expression of the SOD1 gene. Genomic DNA from more than 1200 SALS cases from Ireland, Scotland, Quebec and the USA was genotyped for the 50bp SOD1 promoter deletion. Reporter gene expression analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies were utilized to examine the functional effects of the deletion. The genetic association for homozygosity for the promoter deletion with an increased age of symptom onset was confirmed overall in this further study (p=0.032), although it was only statistically significant in the Irish subset, and remained highly significant in the combined set of all cohorts (p=0.001). Functional studies demonstrated that this polymorphism reduces the activity of the SOD1 promoter by approximately 50%. In addition we revealed that the transcription factor SP1 binds within the 50bp deletion region in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that this deletion reduces expression of the SOD1 gene and that levels of the SOD1 protein may modify the phenotype of SALS within selected populations.
PubMed ID
18608091 View in PubMed
Less detail

The -112G>A polymorphism of the secretoglobin 3A2 (SCGB3A2) gene encoding uteroglobin-related protein 1 (UGRP1) increases risk for the development of Graves' disease in subsets of patients with elevated levels of immunoglobulin E.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138513
Source
J Appl Genet. 2011 May;52(2):201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Dimitry A Chistiakov
Natalia V Voronova
Rust I Turakulov
Kirill V Savost'anov
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, 1st Dorozhny Proezd 1, 117545, Moscow, Russia. dimitry.chistiakov@lycos.com
Source
J Appl Genet. 2011 May;52(2):201-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Graves Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Hypersensitivity - genetics
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Russia - epidemiology
Secretoglobins
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Uteroglobin - blood - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The human secretoglobin 3A2 (SCGB3A2) gene encoding secretory uteroglobin-related protein 1 (UGRP1) resides on the chromosome region 5q31-33 that harbors a susceptibility locus to several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including asthma and Graves' disease (GD). Recently, association between the marker rs1368408 (-112G?>A), located in the promoter region of the SCGB3A2 gene, and susceptibility to GD was found in Chinese and UK Caucasians. The study aim was to evaluate whether this polymorphism confers GD susceptibility in a large population cohort comprising 1,474 Russian GD patients and 1,619 controls. The marker rs1368408 was studied using a TaqMan allele discrimination assay. Serum levels of UGRP1 and immunoglobulin E (IgE) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses. Association between the allele A of SCGB3A2 and a higher risk of GD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.33, P = 2.9 × 10(-5)) was shown. Both affected and non-affected carriers of the higher risk genotype A/A had significantly decreased levels of serum UGRP1 compared to the subjects homozygous for G/G (93 ± 37 pg/ml vs. 132 ± 45 pg/ml, P = 0.0011 for GD patients; 77 ± 28 pg/ml vs. 119 ± 33 pg/ml, P = 0.0019 for controls). Serum IgE levels were significantly higher in non-affected subjects homozygous for A/A compared to control individuals homozygous for G/G (153 ± 46 IU/ml vs. 122 ± 40 IU/ml, P = 0.0095). Our data suggest that the carriage of the SCGB3A2 -112A/A variant increases the risk for GD in subsets of patients with elevated levels of IgE, a hallmark of allergic asthma. Therefore, the SCGB3A2 -112G?>A polymorphism may be considered as a likely marker linking susceptibility to allergy/asthma and GD on chromosome 5q31-33.
PubMed ID
21170691 View in PubMed
Less detail

-160C/A polymorphism in the E-cadherin gene promoter and risk of hereditary, familial and sporadic prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17926
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2004
Author
Jonsson B-A
Adami H-O
Hägglund M
Bergh A
Göransson I
Stattin P
Wiklund F
Grönberg H
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Date
Apr-10-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadherins - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Prostate
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The E-cadherin (CDH1) gene has been associated with prostate carcinogenesis. The C/A polymorphism--160 base pairs relative to the transcription start site has been shown to decrease gene transcription. We analyzed the association between this polymorphism and the risk of sporadic, familial (2 close relatives) and hereditary (3 or more close relatives) prostate cancer. We combined data from 3 population-based epidemiologic studies in Sweden encompassing altogether 1,036 prostate cancer cases and 669 controls that were genotyped for the short nucleotide polymorphism. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated through unconditional logistic regression. We found no significant association between the A-allele and sporadic (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2) or familial (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 0.9-2.2) prostate cancer. In contrast, risk of hereditary cancer was increased among heterozygote CA carriers (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.7) and particularly among homozygote AA carriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.4-4.9). Our data indicate that the -160 single nucleotide polymorphism in CDH1 is a low-penetrant prostate cancer susceptibility gene that might explain a proportion of familial and notably hereditary prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
14961571 View in PubMed
Less detail

The -238 and -308 G-->A polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor alpha gene promoter are not associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or altered birth weight in Danish Caucasians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47878
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S K Rasmussen
S A Urhammer
J N Jensen
T. Hansen
K. Borch-Johnsen
O. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center and Hagedorn Research Institute, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - genetics
Body constitution
Body mass index
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - genetics
Abstract
Recently, two G-->A polymorphisms at positions -308 and -238, in the promoter of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene, have been identified. These variants have, in different ethnic groups, been linked to estimates of insulin resistance and obesity. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether these genetic variants of TNF-alpha were associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or alterations in birth weight in two Danish study populations comprising 380 unrelated young healthy subjects and 249 glucose-tolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients, respectively. All study participants underwent an iv glucose tolerance test with the addition of tolbutamide after 20 min. In addition, a number of biochemical and anthropometric measures were performed on each subject. The subjects were genotyped for the polymorphisms by applying PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. Neither of the variants was related to altered insulin sensitivity index or other features of the insulin resistance syndrome (body mass index, waist to hip ratio, fat mass, fasting serum lipids or fasting serum insulin or C-peptide). Birth weight and the ponderal index were also not associated with the polymorphisms. In conclusion, although the study was carried out on sufficiently large study samples, the study does not support a major role of the -308 or -238 substitutions of the TNF-alpha gene in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or altered birth weight among Danish Caucasian subjects.
PubMed ID
10770222 View in PubMed
Less detail

The -250G>A promoter variant in hepatic lipase associates with elevated fasting serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol modulated by interaction with physical activity in a study of 16,156 Danish subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85800
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Grarup Niels
Andreasen Camilla H
Andersen Mette K
Albrechtsen Anders
Sandbaek Annelli
Lauritzen Torsten
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Jørgensen Torben
Schmitz Ole
Hansen Torben
Pedersen Oluf
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Niels Steensens Vej 1, Gentofte, Denmark. ngrp@steno.dk
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jun;93(6):2294-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Fasting - blood
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipase - genetics
Motor Activity - genetics - physiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hepatic lipase plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein by involvement in reverse cholesterol transport and the formation of atherogenic small dense low-density lipoprotein. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to investigate the impact of variants in LIPC on metabolic traits and type 2 diabetes in a large sample of Danes. Because behavioral factors influence hepatic lipase activity, we furthermore examined possible gene-environment interactions in the population-based Inter99 study. DESIGN: The LIPC -250G>A (rs2070895) variant was genotyped in the Inter99 study (n = 6070), the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care Denmark screening cohort of individuals with risk factors for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 8662), and in additional type 2 diabetic patients (n = 1,064) and glucose-tolerant control subjects (n = 360). RESULTS: In the Inter99 study, the A allele of rs2070895 associated with a 0.057 mmol/liter [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.039-0.075] increase in fasting serum HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 8 x 10(-10)) supported by association in the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen Detected Diabetes in Primary Care study [0.038 mmol/liter per allele (95% CI 0.024-0.053); P = 2 x 10(-7)). The allelic effect on HDL-c was modulated by interaction with self-reported physical activity (P(interaction) = 0.002) because vigorous physically active homozygous A-allele carriers had a 0.30 mmol/liter (95% CI 0.22-0.37) increase in HDL-c compared with homozygous G-allele carriers. CONCLUSIONS: We validate the association of LIPC promoter variation with fasting serum HDL-c and present data supporting an interaction with physical activity implying an increased effect on HDL-c in vigorous physically active subjects carrying the -250 A allele. This interaction may have potential implications for public health and disease prevention.
PubMed ID
18364377 View in PubMed
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The -629C>A polymorphism in the CETP gene does not explain the association of TaqIB polymorphism with risk and age of myocardial infarction in Icelandic men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53840
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
G. Eiriksdottir
M K Bolla
B. Thorsson
G. Sigurdsson
S E Humphries
V. Gudnason
Author Affiliation
Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Hjartavernd, Icelandic Heart Association, Lagmuli 9, 108, Reykjavik, Iceland. gudny@hjarta.is
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Glycoproteins
Homozygote
Humans
Iceland
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions (Genetics) - genetics
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether the well-established effect of the common TaqIB polymorphism in intron 1 of the gene for cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) on high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), could be explained by the recently identified -629C>A functional polymorphism in the promoter. Non-fatal MI cases (388 male) and a control group of 794 healthy men were recruited from the 30 year long prospective Reykjavik Study. In the healthy men the frequency of the TaqIB B2 allele was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.44-0.50) and there was a strong allelic association with the -629A allele (D=-0.21, P
PubMed ID
11689220 View in PubMed
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Abnormal ornithine decarboxylase activity in transgenic mice increases tumor formation and infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19846
Source
Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2001 May;33(5):507-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
P T Kilpeläinen
J. Saarimies
S I Kontusaari
M J Järvinen
A P Soler
M J Kallioinen
O A Hietala
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2001 May;33(5):507-20
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Genitalia, Male - anatomy & histology - enzymology
Heterozygote
Infertility - etiology
Male
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Neoplasms - enzymology - etiology
Ornithine Decarboxylase - genetics - metabolism
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
A transgenic mouse line carrying ornithine decarboxylase cDNA as the transgene under the control of a mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) promoter was generated in order to study whether ornithine decarboxylase transgene expression will have any physiological or pathological effect during the entire life of a transgenic mouse. The high frequency of infertile animals and the loss of pups made the breeding of homozygous mice unsuccessful. However, a colony of heterozygous transgenic mice was followed for 2 years. In adult heterozygous transgenic mice, ornithine decarboxylase activity was significantly increased in the testis, seminal vesicle and preputial gland when compared to non-transgenic controls. In contrast, ornithine decarboxylase activity was decreased in the kidney and prostate of transgenic mice. No significant changes in ornithine decarboxylase activity were found in the ovary and mammary gland and only moderate changes in ornithine decarboxylase activity were detected in the heart, brain, pancreas and lung. The most common abnormalities found in adult animals (12 males and 20 females) of the transgenic line were inflammatory processes, including pancreatitis, hepatitis, sialoadenitis and pyelonephritis. Spontaneous tumors were observed in eight animals, including two benign tumors (one dermatofibroma, one liver hemangioma) and six malignant tumors (one lymphoma, one intestinal and three mammary adenocarcinomas and one adenocarcinoma in the lung). No significant pathological changes were found in 17 nontransgenic controls.
PubMed ID
11331206 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of association between genetic variation in the LIPC gene promoter and plasma lipoproteins in three Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5558
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Sep;146(1):153-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
R A Hegele
S B Harris
J H Brunt
T K Young
A J Hanley
B. Zinman
P W Connelly
Author Affiliation
Blackburn Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medicine, London, Ont., Canada. robert.hegele@rri.on.ca
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Sep;146(1):153-60
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Arteriosclerosis - genetics
Canada
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Lipase - blood - genetics
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Liver - enzymology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Population Surveillance
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Trans-Activation (Genetics)
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
The promoter sequence variant -480T in the hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) has been shown to be significantly associated with low post-heparin hepatic lipase activity. Some studies have also found that the -480T variant is associated with elevation in plasma HDL cholesterol. We tested for associations of LIPC -480T with plasma lipoprotein traits in samples taken from three distinct Canadian populations: 657 Alberta Hutterites, 328 Ontario Oji-Cree and 210 Keewatin Inuit. Plasma HL activity was not available for analyses. The LIPC -480T allele frequencies in these three groups, respectively, were 0.219, 0.527 and 0.383, and the prevalence of LIPC -480T/T homozygotes was, respectively, 0.042, 0.274 and 0.167. No significant association was found between LIPC -480T and plasma HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein AI concentration, after adjusting for covariates including gender and body mass index. There was no consistent relationship between the population mean plasma HDL cholesterol concentration and the population LIPC -480T frequency. Our findings are consistent with the idea that the common promoter variation in LIPC, which has been reported to be associated with variation in post heparin HL activity and HDL triglyceride concentration, is not always associated with variation in plasma HDL cholesterol concentration, possibly due to yet unspecified environmental or genetic factors.
PubMed ID
10487498 View in PubMed
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Acquired macrolide resistance genes in pathogenic Neisseria spp. isolated between 1940 and 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182672
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Sydney Cousin
William L H Whittington
Marilyn C Roberts
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Conjugation, Genetic
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Genotype
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Methyltransferases - genetics
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects - genetics
Neisseria meningitidis - drug effects - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Time Factors
Abstract
Seventy-six Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, isolated between 1940 and 1987, and seven Neisseria meningitidis isolates, isolated between 1963 and 1987, were screened for the presence of acquired mef(A), erm(B), erm(C), and erm(F) genes by using DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR analysis, and sequencing. The mef(A), erm(B), and erm(F) genes were all identified in a 1955 N. gonorrhoeae isolate, while the erm(C) gene was identified in a 1963 N. gonorrhoeae isolate. Similarly, both the mef(A) and erm(F) genes were identified in a 1963 N. meningitidis isolate. All four acquired genes were found in later isolates of both species. The mef(A) gene from a 1975 N. gonorrhoeae isolate was sequenced and had 100% DNA and amino acid identity with the mef(A) gene from a 1990s Streptococcus pneumoniae isolate. Selected early isolates were able to transfer their acquired genes to an Enterococcus faecalis recipient, suggesting that these genes are associated with conjugative transposons. These isolates are the oldest of any species to carry the mef(A) gene and among the oldest to carry these erm genes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14638497 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin and adiponectin receptor gene variants in relation to resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and adiposity-related phenotypes in the Quebec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165769
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ruth J F Loos
Stéphanie Ruchat
Tuomo Rankinen
Angelo Tremblay
Louis Pérusse
Claude Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):26-34
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - genetics - metabolism
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Basal Metabolism - genetics - physiology
Body Composition - genetics
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics - metabolism
Oxygen Consumption - genetics - physiology
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Quebec
Receptors, Adiponectin
Receptors, Cell Surface - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Despite adiponectin's presumed role in fatty acid oxidation and energy homeostasis, little is known about the effect of gene variants on substrate oxidation, energy expenditure, and adiposity-related phenotypes.
We examined the effects of genetic variation in adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2) on resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient (RQ), and adiposity-related phenotypes.
We studied the associations of ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, and ADIPOR2 polymorphisms with resting metabolic rate, RQ, and body mass index, percentage body fat, sum of 6 skinfold thicknesses, waist circumference, and total, subcutaneous, and visceral fat in 759 participants in the Québec Family Study.
The ADIPOQ 45T-->G single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was significantly (P = 0.0002 to 0.04) associated with overall adiposity and abdominal adiposity; the rare homozygotes (G/G) had a leaner phenotype than did the carriers of the common allele. One SNP each in the putative promoter of ADIPOR1 (ie, -3882T-->C) and ADIPOR2 (ie, IVS1 -1352G-->A) was associated with RQ (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively), and the association was even stronger in nonobese persons (P = 0.02 and 0.003). Carriers of the common alleles (ADIPOR1 T and ADIPOR2 G alleles) had a lower RQ than did the rare homozygotes. A significant genotype-by-genotype interaction (P = 0.0002 to 0.02) was found between SNPs in the promoters of ADIPOQ (-3971A-->G) and ADIPOR1 (-3882T-->C). Subjects carrying the minor ADIPOQ allele (G allele) who were rare homozygotes (C/C) for the ADIPOR1 SNP had a higher RQ (P = 0.003) and greater overall (P G variant contributes to overall fatness and abdominal obesity are confirmed. Moreover, variants in the promoter region of both ADIPOR genes contribute to substrate oxidation.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):1-217209169
PubMed ID
17209173 View in PubMed
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316 records – page 1 of 32.