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A 3 year follow-up study of health care students' sense of coherence and related smoking, drinking and physical exercise factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186071
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Merja Kuuppelomäki
Pekka Utriainen
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Centre for Social Welfare and Health, Seinäjoki Polytechnic, Koskenalantie 16 Seinäjoki Fin-60220, Finland. merja.kuuppelomaki@seamk.fi
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):383-8
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Educational Status
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Smoking - psychology
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to describe the sense of coherence (SOC) of three groups of Finnish polytechnic students (n=287) at the beginning of their studies and to follow it during a period of 3 year amongst the health care students (n=63) of this group. The associations between SOC and smoking, drinking and physical exercise were also studied. The data were collected with a questionnaire which included Antonovsky's (Adv. Nurs. Sci. 1(1983)37) SOC scale. Data analysis was with SPSS statistical software. The students showed a strong sense of coherence at the beginning of their studies. Physical activity was related to the strength of SOC, but no association was found with smoking and drinking. Health care students showed a stronger SOC at the beginning of their studies than the two other groups. During the follow-up focused on the health care students, SOC weakened in 6%, remained unchanged in 65% and strengthened in 32% of the participants. Smoking, drinking and physical exercise showed no association with these changes. Future research should be focused on identifying factors that are related to SOC during education.
PubMed ID
12667515 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels during breast-feeding with or without maternal or infantile supplementation of vitamin D.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238975
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1985 Apr;4(2):220-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1985
Author
M. Ala-Houhala
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1985 Apr;4(2):220-6
Date
Apr-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Breast Feeding
Calcium - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood
Infant
Magnesium - blood
Phosphorus - blood
Pilot Projects
Rickets - prevention & control
Risk
Seasons
Sunlight
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Abstract
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and alkaline phosphatase levels of breast-fed infants and their mothers were studied by following 100 healthy term mother-infant pairs with different supplementation protocols of vitamin D. A pilot study in winter revealed that six of eight breast-fed infants without vitamin D supplementation had serum 25-OHD levels below the risk limit for rickets (5 ng/ml) at the age of 8 weeks. In the main study in winter groups, it was found that the 25-OHD levels were low (5.6 +/- 3.7 ng/ml) at the age of 8 weeks in the unsupplemented breast-fed infants, whose mothers were given vitamin D supplementation of 1,000 IU/day during lactation (group I), compared with the levels of those infants receiving either 400 (18.0 +/- 8.4 ng/ml, group II) or 1,000 IU (22.8 +/- 11.2 ng/ml, group III) vitamin D (group I vs. group II or III, p less than 0.001; group II vs. group III, NS). In group I 10 of 18 infants had serum 25-OHD levels less than 5 ng/ml compared with none of the infants in groups II and III. Yet the infants with 25-OHD levels less than 5 ng/ml showed no signs of clinical or biochemical rickets at the age of 8 or 20 weeks. In summer at delivery the maternal 25-OHD levels were good, but decreased thereafter. Also in summer groups, the infantile 25-OHD concentrations decreased; however, because the levels at delivery were high, they stayed in the normal range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3989622 View in PubMed
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657del5 mutation in the gene for Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS1) in a cohort of Russian children with lymphoid tissue malignancies and controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184730
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2003 Jul 15;120A(2):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2003
Author
Igor B Resnick
Irina Kondratenko
Eugeni Pashanov
Alexey A Maschan
Alexander Karachunsky
Oleg Togoev
Andrey Timakov
Alexander Polyakov
Svetlana Tverskaya
Oleg Evgrafov
Alexander G Roumiantsev
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Research Institute for Paediatric Hematology, Moscow, Russia. gashka@hadassah.org.il
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2003 Jul 15;120A(2):174-9
Date
Jul-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Breakage - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8
Cohort Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing
Heterozygote
Humans
Loss of Heterozygosity
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - genetics - pathology
Lymphoproliferative Disorders - genetics - pathology
Male
Mutation
Pedigree
Pilot Projects
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - genetics - pathology
Russia
Sequence Deletion
Syndrome
Abstract
Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS, OMIM 251260) is a rare hereditary disease, characterized by immune deficiency, microcephaly, and an extremely high incidence of lymphoid tissue malignancies. The gene mutated in NBS, NBS1, was recently cloned from its location on chromosome 8q21. The encoded protein, nibrin (p95), together with hMre11 and hRad50, is involved in the double-strand DNA break repair system. We screened two Russian cohorts for the 657del5 NBS1 mutation and found no carriers in 548 controls and two carriers in 68 patients with lymphoid malignancies: one with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and one with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Several relatives of the second patient, who were carriers of the same mutation, had cancer (ALL, breast cancer, GI cancers). These preliminary data suggest that NBS1 mutation carriers can be predisposed to malignant disorders.
PubMed ID
12833396 View in PubMed
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2006 Ontario Survey on the Prevalence and Control of Hypertension (ON-BP): rationale and design of a community-based cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156763
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):503-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
J George Fodor
Frans H H Leenen
Eftyhia Helis
Penelope Turton
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Canada. gfodor@ottawaheart.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):503-5
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Abstract
The presently available Canadian data, based on direct measurements of blood pressure (BP) from the Canadian Heart Health Surveys, are more than 15 years old. In view of major changes in the demographics and health status of the Ontario population, there is an urgent need to update this information. On the initiative of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, jointly with Statistics Canada, designed and implemented a population-based cross-sectional survey of hypertension in the Province of Ontario: the 2006 Ontario Survey on the Prevalence and Control of Hypertension (ON-BP).
To establish the prevalence of hypertension in the Ontario adult population between the ages of 20 and 79 years; to assess the awareness, current status and management of hypertension; and to gather respondent information about sex, age, physical measurements, personal health practices, socioeconomic measures, ethnicity and comorbidities.
The present paper describes the background history and the successive steps undertaken during the implementation of this project.
The authors' experiences from the ON-BP indicate that close co-operation between research scientists, statisticians, governmental and nongovernmental organizations -- in the present case, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario -- is essential to conduct a successful, large-scale survey of BP distribution.
Notes
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2001 Mar;14(3):241-711281235
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 14;289(18):2363-912746359
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jul 9;290(2):199-20612851274
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2004 Apr;17(4):354-6015062890
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Jan;22(1):11-915106785
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Aug;22(8):1479-8515257169
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2004 Oct;54(507):765-7115469676
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jun 1;146(11):1997-20051596849
Cites: Hypertension. 1995 Jul;26(1):60-97607734
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jul 20;313(7050):1478688776
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Fam Pract. 2006 Feb;23(1):20-716332947
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2006;24(5):425-4116706569
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Mar 3;369(9563):750-617336651
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):467-7317487292
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):561-517534463
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Mar;21(3):280-318219304
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1441-918490640
PubMed ID
18548149 View in PubMed
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Absence of nutritional or clinical consequences of decentralized bulk food portioning in elderly nursing home residents with dementia in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196462
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Nov;100(11):1354-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
B. Shatenstein
G. Ferland
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Nov;100(11):1354-60
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Canada
Dementia - metabolism
Eating - physiology - psychology
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Weight Gain
Abstract
To evaluate the nutritional and clinical consequences of changing from a centralized food delivery system to decentralized bulk food portioning; a system in which meal portioning occurs on residents' floors of a nursing home.
A pilot study with a pre-post design
The study took place on one floor of a home for elderly persons with dementia. Of the 34 residents, 22 (1 man) participated in this study. Average age was 82 years (range = 55 to 94 years). Nutritional status was verified before introduction of the bulk food portioning system by 3 nonconsecutive days of observed food intakes, anthropometric measurements (height, weight, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper-arm circumference), and biochemical parameters (albumin, lymphocytes, glucose, sodium, potassium, transferrin, vitamin B-12, folate, hemoglobin). Trained dietitians collected the dietary and anthropometric data and validated the food intake estimates and anthropometric measurements. Data were also collected 10 weeks after implementation of the new food distribution system.
Paired t tests adjusted by a Bonferroni correction assessed differences between values measured before and after introduction of the new food distribution system.
Average food consumption increased substantially and significantly after introduction of the bulk food portioning system. Mean energy intakes rose from 1,555 to 1,924 kcal/day and most other nutrients also increased, many significantly, but there were no changes in anthropometric values or biochemical parameters, except for albumin level which decreased to the lower normal limit.
Portioning of food in the residents' dining room simulates a homelike atmosphere thereby encouraging increased food consumption. With well-trained and enthusiastic staff, this system could contribute to improved nutritional status in the very elderly, even those who have dementia. Dietitians have a key role to play in overseeing residents' nutritional needs and in training, supervising, and motivating foodservice personnel.
PubMed ID
11103658 View in PubMed
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Accelerated decline in Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence rate during the screen and treat project in Vammala, Finland, as demonstrated in 29- to 45-year-old pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181548
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Leena Rehnberg-Laiho
Anniina Salomaa
Hilpi Rautelin
Pentti Koskela
Seppo Sarna
Timo U Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Haartman Institute, Haartmaninkatu 3, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Stomach Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The potential preventability of serious helicobacter-associated diseases - especially gastric cancer - has evoked interest in eradicating this pathogen from the population. We assessed the efficacy of the pioneering screen and treat intervention project in Vammala by studying helicobacter seroprevalence in pregnant women representing the normal population. Consecutive maternity clinic samples from native Finnish females at five different localities in 1995 (n=701) and 2000 (n=772) were investigated for class IgG H. pylori antibodies by enzyme immunoassay (Pyloriset EIA-G III, Orion Diagnostica, Espoo, Finland). In Vammala the change in helicobacter seroprevalence was -13%-units (between 1995 and 2000; p=0.0125, chi-square test) in > or =29-year-old females, +1.6%-units (difference statistically non-significant) in
PubMed ID
14961972 View in PubMed
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Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and concurrent validity of measures to predict older driver involvement in motor vehicle crashes: an Emergency Department pilot case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161383
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Frank J Molnar
Shawn C Marshall
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Keith G Wilson
Anna M Byszewski
Ian Stiell
Author Affiliation
CanDRIVE(1): a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Aging funded New Emerging Team, Elisabeth-Bruyère Research Institute, 43 Bruyère Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 5C8. fmolnar@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Head Movements
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Psychomotor Performance
Questionnaires
Reaction Time
Risk
Visual Fields
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Older drivers have one of the highest motor vehicle crash (MVC) rates per kilometer driven, largely due to the functional effects of the accumulation, and progression of age-associated medical conditions that eventually impact on fitness-to-drive. Consequently, physicians in many jurisdictions are legally mandated to report to licensing authorities patients who are judged to be medically at risk for MVCs. Unfortunately, physicians lack evidence-based tools to assess the fitness-to-drive of their older patients. This paper reports on a pilot study that examines the acceptability and association with MVC of components of a comprehensive clinical assessment battery.
To evaluate the acceptability to participants of components of a comprehensive assessment battery, and to explore potential predictors of MVC that can be employed in front-line clinical settings.
Case-control study of 10 older drivers presenting to a tertiary care hospital emergency department after involvement in an MVC and 20 age-matched controls.
The measures tested were generally found to be acceptable to participants. Positive associations (p
PubMed ID
17854579 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and commitment group therapy for health anxiety--results from a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108574
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
T. Eilenberg
L. Kronstrand
P. Fink
L. Frostholm
Author Affiliation
The Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Barthsgade 5.1, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Questionnaires
Abstract
Health anxiety (or hypochondriasis) is prevalent, may be persistent and disabling for the sufferers and associated with high societal costs. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a new third-wave behavioral cognitive therapy that has not yet been tested in health anxiety. 34 consecutive Danish patients with severe health anxiety were referred from general practitioners or hospital departments and received a ten-session ACT group therapy. Patients were followed up by questionnaires for 6 months. There were significant reductions in health anxiety, somatic symptoms and emotional distress at 6 months compared to baseline: a 49% reduction in health anxiety (Whiteley-7 Index), a 47% decrease in emotional distress (SCL-8), and a 40% decrease in somatic symptoms (SCL-90R Somatization Subscale). The patients' emotional representations and perception of the consequences of their illness (IPQ) improved significantly, and 87% of the patients were very or extremely satisfied with the treatment.
PubMed ID
23871841 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of ostomy surgery--a Swedish pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216403
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1995;9(1):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G. Nordström
K. Lützén
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1995;9(1):11-5
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disabled Persons - psychology
Enterostomy - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
The main purpose of this pilot study was instrument development, focused on personal adjustment following ostomy surgery. Two instruments were used: a translated and revised version of the Acceptance of Disability Scale, Modified (ADM), and Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence (SOC) questionnaire. A sample of 26 patients enrolled consecutively at the Ostomy Care Centre at a Swedish hospital were included in the study. A Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.95 was obtained for the ADM Scale, Swedish version, which is consistent with the results of similar studies. A significant difference between the ADM scores and type of ostomy surgery indicated that persons with a continent ostomy had a greater acceptance of ostomy surgery than had subjects with conventional ostomy surgery. A close correlation between ADM and SOC was obtained, indicating that persons who accept ostomy surgery will also have a good sense of coherence. The result of this pilot study indicates that further research using both measures may be useful in order to identify which factors are of relevance for nursing practice.
PubMed ID
7777747 View in PubMed
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2602 records – page 1 of 261.