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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Dec 9;134(23-24):2245-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-2014
Author
Halvor Aarnes
Tom Andersen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Dec 9;134(23-24):2245-6
Date
Dec-9-2014
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth rate
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Mathematical Computing
Norway
Programming Languages
Seasons
Software
PubMed ID
25492331 View in PubMed
Less detail

CANEST: a microcomputer program for estimating cancer in a cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24799
Source
Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 1991 Jul;35(3):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
B. Sigurgeirsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 1991 Jul;35(3):193-201
Date
Jul-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Incidence
Mathematical Computing
Microcomputers
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Prevalence
Programming Languages
Software
Sweden - epidemiology
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Certain diseases and symptoms carry an overrepresentation of cancer. To be able to measure the strength of such an association it is necessary to be able to predict cancer development in the group being observed. A computer program for computers running under the MS DOS operating system has been developed for this purpose. The program is written in the CLIPPER programming language. The estimates are based on incidence and prevalence data from the Swedish Cancer Registry for the years 1958 to 1986. The program also computes confidence intervals based on the Poisson distribution. The results can be printed out or exported to other programs for further analysis.
PubMed ID
1935012 View in PubMed
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Data transmission: a world of possibilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185039
Source
J AHIMA. 2001 May;72(5):26-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001

Julius--a template based supplementary electronic health record system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163814
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2007;7:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Rong Chen
Gösta Enberg
Gunnar O Klein
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. rong.chen@cambio.se
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2007;7:10
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Information Systems
Computer Security
Computer Systems
Database Management Systems
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Programming Languages
Registries
Sweden
Systems Integration
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
EHR systems are widely used in hospitals and primary care centres but it is usually difficult to share information and to collect patient data for clinical research. This is partly due to the different proprietary information models and inconsistent data quality. Our objective was to provide a more flexible solution enabling the clinicians to define which data to be recorded and shared for both routine documentation and clinical studies. The data should be possible to reuse through a common set of variable definitions providing a consistent nomenclature and validation of data. Another objective was that the templates used for the data entry and presentation should be possible to use in combination with the existing EHR systems.
We have designed and developed a template based system (called Julius) that was integrated with existing EHR systems. The system is driven by the medical domain knowledge defined by clinicians in the form of templates and variable definitions stored in a common data repository. The system architecture consists of three layers. The presentation layer is purely web-based, which facilitates integration with existing EHR products. The domain layer consists of the template design system, a variable/clinical concept definition system, the transformation and validation logic all implemented in Java. The data source layer utilizes an object relational mapping tool and a relational database.
The Julius system has been implemented, tested and deployed to three health care units in Stockholm, Sweden. The initial responses from the pilot users were positive. The template system facilitates patient data collection in many ways. The experience of using the template system suggests that enabling the clinicians to be in control of the system, is a good way to add supplementary functionality to the present EHR systems.
The approach of the template system in combination with various local EHR systems can facilitate the sharing and reuse of validated clinical information from different health care units. However, future system developments for these purposes should consider using the openEHR/CEN models with shareable archetypes.
Notes
Cites: Methods Inf Med. 1997 Aug;36(3):163-719293714
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2004 Mar-Apr;11(2):162-514662800
Cites: Methods Inf Med. 2000 Mar;39(1):50-510786070
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 1998 May-Jun;5(3):237-449609493
PubMed ID
17474997 View in PubMed
Less detail

A knowledge-based care protocol system for ICU.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216223
Source
Medinfo. 1995;8 Pt 2:979-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
F. Lau
D D Vincent
Author Affiliation
Department of Accounting & MIS, Faculty of Business, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Medinfo. 1995;8 Pt 2:979-83
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Clinical Protocols
Critical Pathways
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Decision Trees
Efficiency
Expert Systems
Forecasting
Humans
Intensive Care Units - trends
Length of Stay
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Programming Languages
Risk factors
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
There is a growing interest in using care maps in ICU. So far, the emphasis has been on developing the critical path, problem/outcome, and variance reporting for specific diagnoses. This paper presents a conceptual knowledge-based care protocol system design for the ICU. It is based on the manual care map currently in use for managing myocardial infarction in the ICU of the Sturgeon General Hospital in Alberta. The proposed design uses expert rules, object schemas, case-based reasoning, and quantitative models as sources of its knowledge. Also being developed is a decision model with explicit linkages for outcome-process-measure from the care map. The resulting system is intended as a bedside charting and decision-support tool for caregivers. Proposed usage includes charting by acknowledgment, generation of alerts, and critiques on variances/events recorded, recommendations for planned interventions, and comparison with historical cases. Currently, a prototype is being developed on a PC-based network with Visual Basic, Level-Expert Object, and xBase. A clinical trial is also planned to evaluate whether this knowledge-based care protocol can reduce the length of stay of patients with myocardial infarction in the ICU.
PubMed ID
8591604 View in PubMed
Less detail

Synthesis of elementary single-disease recommendations to support guideline-based therapeutic decision for complex polypathological patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178473
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2004;107(Pt 1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Gersende Georg
Brigitte Séroussi
Jacques Bouaud
Author Affiliation
STIM, DPA/DSI, AP-HP-Paris, 91 boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75634 Paris Cedex 13, France. gge@biomath.jussieu.fr
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2004;107(Pt 1):38-42
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Comorbidity
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Decision Support Techniques
Humans
Hypertension - complications - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Programming Languages
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
Situations managed by clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) usually correspond to general descriptions of theoretical patients that suffer from only one disease in addition to the specific pathology CPGs focus on. The lack of decision support for complex multiple-disease patients is usually transferred to computer-based systems. Starting from the GEM-encoded instance of CPGs, we developed a module that automatically generated IF-THEN-WITH decision rules. A two-stage unification process has been implemented. All the rules whose IF-part is in partial matching with a patient clinical profile were triggered. A synthesis of triggered rules has then been performed to eliminate redundancies and incoherences. All remaining, eventually contradictory, recommendations were displayed to physicians leaving them the responsibility of handling the controversy and thus the opportunity to control the therapeutic decision.
PubMed ID
15360770 View in PubMed
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[Use of computers in the roentgenological diagnosis of gynecologic diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69694
Source
Akush Ginekol (Mosk). 1989 Oct;(10):57-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
E T Mikhailenko
V I Mi'lko
A N Kostiuchenko
K M Golubev
V A Sokolova
Source
Akush Ginekol (Mosk). 1989 Oct;(10):57-8
Date
Oct-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
English Abstract
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - radiography
Humans
Programming Languages
Ukraine
Abstract
The authors analyze the use of computers in x-ray examinations of gynecologic patients. X-ray signs of infertility, endometritis, tuberculosis, myoma, malignant tumors, etc. were formalized. A total of 131 patients were examined and a council of physicians for these cases was computer-simulated. Variants of computer-processed x-ray diagnoses are presented, their informativeness indexes ranging from 0 to 100%. Programmed processing may be realized via SM-4, SM-1420, IZOT-1016C, Electronika 100-25 computers. The FORTRAN program language was employed to make up the programs.
PubMed ID
2694846 View in PubMed
Less detail

What is the coverage of SNOMED CT®on scientific medical corpora?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131613
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;169:814-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Dimitrios Kokkinakis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Language Technology, Department of Swedish Language, the Swedish Language Bank, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. dimitrios.kokkinakis@svenska.gu.se
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;169:814-8
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval
Language
Medical Informatics - methods
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Programming Languages
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine
Terminology as Topic
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
This paper reports on the results of a large scale mapping of SNOMED CT on scientific medical corpora. The aim is to automatically access the validity, reliability and coverage of the Swedish SNOMED-CT translation, the largest, most extensive available resource of medical terminology. The method described here is based on the generation of predominantly safe harbor term variants which together with simple linguistic processing and the already available SNOMED term content are mapped to large corpora. The results show that term variations are very frequent and this may have implication on technological applications (such as indexing and information retrieval, decision support systems, text mining) using SNOMED CT. Naïve approaches to terminology mapping and indexing would critically affect the performance, success and results of such applications. SNOMED CT appears not well-suited for automatically capturing the enormous variety of concepts in scientific corpora (only 6,3% of all SNOMED terms could be directly matched to the corpus) unless extensive variant forms are generated and fuzzy and partial matching techniques are applied with the risk of allowing the recognition of a large number of false positives and spurious results.
PubMed ID
21893860 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.