Skip header and navigation

Refine By

107 records – page 1 of 11.

The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness, part 1: contextualizing case management for ending homelessness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130590
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, AB, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management
Community Health Services
Concept Formation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Homeless Persons
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, organizational
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and part-2 articulates the 6 Dimensions of Quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are: (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
21986969 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic practice-policy partnerships for health promotion research: experiences from three research programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259816
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Charli C-G Eriksson
Ingela Fredriksson
Karin Fröding
Susanna Geidne
Camilla Pettersson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Program Evaluation
Research Personnel - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The development of knowledge for health promotion requires an effective mechanism for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policymakers. The challenge is better to understand the dynamic and ever-changing context of the researcher-practitioner-policymaker-community relationship.
The aims were to explore the factors that foster Academic Practice Policy (APP) partnerships, and to systematically and transparently to review three cases.
Three partnerships were included: Power and Commitment-Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden; Healthy City-Social Inclusion, Urban Governance, and Sustainable Welfare Development; and Empowering Families with Teenagers-Ideals and Reality in Karlskoga and Degerfors. The analysis includes searching for evidence for three hypotheses concerning contextual factors in multi-stakeholder collaboration, and the cumulative effects of partnership synergy.
APP partnerships emerge during different phases of research and development. Contextual factors are important; researchers need to be trusted by practitioners and politicians. During planning, it is important to involve the relevant partners. During the implementation phase, time is important. During data collection and capacity building, it is important to have shared objectives for and dialogues about research. Finally, dissemination needs to be integrated into any partnership. The links between process and outcomes in participatory research (PR) can be described by the theory of partnership synergy, which includes consideration of how PR can ensure culturally and logistically appropriate research, enhance recruitment capacity, and generate professional capacity and competence in stakeholder groups. Moreover, there are PR synergies over time.
The fundamentals of a genuine partnership are communication, collaboration, shared visions, and willingness of all stakeholders to learn from one another.
PubMed ID
25416579 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active interprofessional education in a patient based setting increases perceived collaborative and professional competence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154632
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Karin Hallin
Anna Kiessling
Annika Waldner
Peter Henriksson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):151-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Professional Competence - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Interprofessional competence can be defined as knowledge and understanding of their own and the other team members' professional roles, comprehension of communication and teamwork and collaboration in taking care of patients.
To evaluate whether students perceived that they had achieved interprofessional competence after participating in clinical teamwork training.
Six hundred and sixteen students from four undergraduate educational programs-medicine, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy-participated in an interprofessional course at a clinical education ward. The students filled out pre and post questionnaires (96% response rate).
All student groups increased their perceived interprofessional competence. Occupational therapy and medical students had the greatest achievements. All student groups perceived improved knowledge of the other three professions' work (p = 0.000000) and assessed that the course had contributed to the understanding of the importance of communication and teamwork to patient care (effect size 1.0; p = 0.00002). The medical students had the greatest gain (p = 0.00093). All student groups perceived that the clarity of their own professional role had increased significantly (p = 0.00003). Occupational therapy students had the greatest gain (p = 0.000014).
Active patient based learning by working together in a real ward context seemed to be an effective means to increase collaborative and professional competence.
PubMed ID
18937139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing elder abuse: the Waterloo restorative justice approach to elder abuse project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135616
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Apr;23(2):127-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arlene Groh
Rick Linden
Author Affiliation
Healing Approaches for Elder Abuse and Mistreatment, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Apr;23(2):127-46
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Elder Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services for the Aged - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Program Evaluation
Risk assessment
Social Support
Vulnerable Populations - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) of Waterloo Region, in partnership with a number of other social service agencies, designed and implemented a restorative justice model applicable to older adults who have been abused by an individual in a position of trust. The project was very successful in building partnerships, as many community agencies came together to deal with the problem of elder abuse. The program also raised the profile of elder abuse in the community. However, despite intensive efforts, referrals to the restorative justice program were quite low. Because of this, the program moved to a new organizational model, the Elder Abuse Response Team (EART), which has retained the guiding philosophy of restorative justice but has broadened the mandate. The team has evolved into a conflict management system that has multiple points of entry for cases and multiple options for dealing with elder abuse. The team has developed a broad range of community partners who can facilitate referrals to the EART and also can help to provide an individualized response to each case. The transition to the EART has been successful, and the number of referrals has increased significantly.
PubMed ID
21462047 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska telemedicine: Growth through collaboration

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6392
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):365-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Patricoski, C
Author Affiliation
Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. cpatricoski@afhcan.org
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):365-86
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network (AFHCAN)
Alaska Federal Healthcare Partnership (AFHCP)
Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council (ATAC)
Alaska Telemedicine Testbed Project (ATTP)
Community health aide program (CHAP)
Organization & administration
Community Health Services
Community Networks
Cooperative Behavior
Forecasting
Health Care Costs
Accessibility
Humans
Medically underserved area
National Health Programs
Policy Making
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quality of Health Care
Remote Consultation
Telecommunications
Telemedicine
Teleradiology
Abstract
The last thirty years have brought the introduction and expansion of telecommunications to rural and remote Alaska. The intellectual and financial investment of earlier projects, the more recent AFHCAN Project and the Universal Service Administrative Company Rural Health Care Division (RHCD) has sparked a new era in telemedicine and telecommunication across Alaska. This spark has been flamed by the dedication and collaboration of leaders at he highest levels of organizations such as: AFHCAN member organizations, AFHCAN Office, Alaska Clinical Engineering Services, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership Office, Alaska Native health Board, Alaska Native Tribal health Consortium, Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council, AT&T Alascom, GCI Inc., Health care providers throughout the state of Alaska, Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of U.S. Senator Ted Steens, State of Alaska, U.S. Department of Homeland Security--United States Coast Guard, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Defense--Air Force and Army, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, University of Alaska, and University of Alaska Anchorage. Alaska now has one of the largest telemedicine programs in the world. As Alaska moves system now in place become self-sustaining, and 2) collaborating with all stakeholders in promoting the growth of an integrated, state-wide telemedicine network.
PubMed ID
15709313 View in PubMed
Less detail

An analysis of the development of a successful medical collaboration to create and sustain family physician anaesthesiology capacity in rural Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174459
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2005 Jun;13(3):178-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jocelyn Lockyer
Peter Norton
Author Affiliation
Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada. lockyer@ucalgary.ca
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2005 Jun;13(3):178-82
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - organization & administration
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Credentialing
Family Practice - organization & administration
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Initial efforts to increase the availability of training positions, standardise training, and obtain national recognition for family physicians who wished to practise anaesthesia had stalled.
To describe the work undertaken to create and sustain family medicine anaesthesiology capacity in Canada.
In our review, we examined the critical aspects of successful intersectoral work, namely, involvement by key stakeholders; the development of decision-making mechanisms; clearly defined objectives, roles and responsibilities; official support and legitimisation from participating organisations and adequate resources for partnership building.
Canadian rural family medicine anaesthesiology practice.
A small steering committee obtained funding for a national meeting of stakeholders and subsequent committee work over an 18-month period. The national meeting brought together the necessary stakeholders to review and discuss the issues and agree on a group-determined agenda, determine a work plan, identify priority areas and allow the College of Family Physicians of Canada to be the lead organisation in moving the work ahead. Within 18 months, the boards of the key organisations had accepted a common set of standards for training and a national curriculum. Work remains in the longer term to identify sustainable funding for training of family physician as well as the provision of continuing medical education for those trained.
Appropriate attention to the key components of successful intersectoral work may enable previously stalled and complex work to move ahead despite opposition.
PubMed ID
15932488 View in PubMed
Less detail

An inter-institutional collaboration: transforming education through interprofessional simulations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113843
Source
J Interprof Care. 2013 Sep;27(5):429-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Sharla King
Jane Drummond
Ellen Hughes
Sharon Bookhalter
Dan Huffman
Dawn Ansell
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Health Sciences Council, Alberta, Canada. sharla.king@ualberta.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2013 Sep;27(5):429-31
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Simulation
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Teaching - methods
Universities
Abstract
An inter-institutional partnership of four post-secondary institutions and a health provider formed a learning community with the goal of developing, implementing and evaluating interprofessional learning experiences in simulation-based environments. The organization, education and educational research activities of the learning community align with the institutional and instructional reforms recommended by the Lancet Commission on Health Professional Education for the 21st century. This article provides an overview of the inter-institutional collaboration, including the interprofessional simulation learning experiences, instructor development activities and preliminary results from the evaluation.
PubMed ID
23679670 View in PubMed
Less detail

An Ontario initiative to enhance the effectiveness of AIDS Service Organizations: Community-Linked Evaluation of AIDS Resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171019
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2005 Mar-Apr;16(2):49-52
Publication Type
Article

Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180433
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2004;10(1):93-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Patricia Dwyer
Valerie Hagerman
Chris-Anne Ingram
Ron MacFarlane
Sherry McCourt
Author Affiliation
TETRA, Faculty of Medicine, MUN, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. patricid@mun.ca
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2004;10(1):93-101
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Cooperative Behavior
Focus Groups
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interviews as Topic
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Organizational Objectives
Prince Edward Island
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Atlantic Canada has some of the earliest, most comprehensive, well-established networks, and innovative applications for telehealth in the country. The region offers a range of models for telehealth, in terms of management structure, coordination, funding, equipment, utilization, and telehealth applications. Collectively, this diversity, experience, and wealth of knowledge can significantly contribute to the development of a knowledge base for excellence in telehealth services. There is no formal process in place for the sharing of information amongst the provinces. Information sharing primarily occurs informally through professional contacts and participation in telehealth organizations. A core group of organizations partnered to develop a process for knowledge exchange to occur. This type of collaborative approach is favored in Atlantic Canada, given the region's economy and available resources. The Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange (ATKE) project centred on the development of a collaborative structure, information sharing and dissemination, development of a knowledge repository and sustainability. The project is viewed as a first step in assisting telehealth stakeholders with sharing knowledge about telehealth in Atlantic Canada. Significant progress has been made throughout the project in increasing the profile of telehealth in Atlantic Canada. The research process has captured and synthesized baseline information on telehealth, and fostered collaboration amongst telehealth providers who might otherwise have never come together. It has also brought critical awareness to the discussion tables of governments and key committees regarding the value of telehealth in sustaining our health system, and has motivated decision makers to take action to integrate telehealth into e-health discussions.
PubMed ID
15104921 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers to patient involvement in health service planning and evaluation: an exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160267
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb;70(2):234-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Anna R Gagliardi
Louise Lemieux-Charles
Adalsteinn D Brown
Terrence Sullivan
Vivek Goel
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Room C8-30, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N3M5. anna.gagliardi@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb;70(2):234-41
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making, Organizational
Female
Health Planning - methods
Health Services Research - methods
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Neoplasms - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Program Evaluation - methods
Qualitative Research
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
Patient involvement in health service planning and evaluation is considered important yet not widely practiced. This study explored stakeholder beliefs about patient participation in performance indicator selection to better understand hypothesized barriers.
Interviews with 30 cancer patients and health professionals from two teaching hospitals were analyzed qualitatively.
All groups believed patients, not members of the public, should be involved in the selection of indicators. Ongoing, interactive methods such as committee involvement, rather than single, passive efforts such as surveys were preferred. Health professionals recommended patients assume a consultative, rather than decision-making role. Older patients agreed with this.
Variable patient interest, health professional attitudes, and a lack of insight on appropriate methods may be limiting patient involvement in this, and other service planning and evaluation activities. More research is required to validate expressed views among the populations these stakeholders represent, and to establish effective methods for engaging patients.
Efforts to encourage a change in health professional attitude may be required, along with dedicated organizational resources, coordinators and training. Methods to engage patients should involve deliberation, which can be achieved through modified Delphi panel or participatory research approaches.
PubMed ID
18023129 View in PubMed
Less detail

107 records – page 1 of 11.