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COMPLETE - a school-based intervention project to increase completion of upper secondary school in Norway: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292326
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 03 09; 18(1):340
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-09-2018
Author
T Larsen
H B Urke
I Holsen
C H Anvik
T Olsen
R H Waldahl
K M Antonsen
R Johnson
M Tobro
B Brastad
T B Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Development, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 03 09; 18(1):340
Date
03-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Clinical Protocols
Cluster analysis
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Learning
Male
Mental health
Norway
Program Evaluation
School Health Services
Schools
Student Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Drop out from upper secondary school represents a risk for the future health and wellbeing of young people. Strengthening of psychosocial aspects of the learning environment may be an effective strategy to promote completion of upper secondary school. This paper is a study protocol of a school based cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating two school-based interventions, namely the Dream School Program (DSP) and the Mental Health Support Team (MHST). The interventions aim to improve psychosocial learning environments and subsequently school achievements and decrease drop-out and absence.
The COMPLETE RCT is aimed at youth in upper secondary school, grade 1 (age 15-16 years), and examines the effect of the combination of the DSP and the MHST; and the DSP only, compared with a comparison group on the following primary outcomes: student completion, presence, average grade, and self-reported mental health. Seventeen upper secondary schools from four counties in Norway were randomized to one of the three arms: 1) DSP and MHST; 2) DSP; and 3) comparison (offered DSP intervention in 2018/2019). The study will evaluate the interventions based on information from two cohorts of students (cohort 1 (C1) and cohort 2 (C2)). For C1, data was collected at baseline (August 2016), and at first follow-up seven months later. Second follow-up will be collected 19 months after baseline. For C2, data was collected at baseline (August 2017), and first and second follow-up will be collected similarly to that of C2 seven and 19 months respectively after baseline. Process evaluations based on focus groups, interviews and observation will be conducted twice (first completed spring 2017).
The COMPLETE trial is a large study that can provide useful knowledge about what interventions might effectively improve completion of upper secondary school. Its thorough process evaluation will provide critical information about barriers and points of improvement for optimizing intervention implementation. Findings can guide school development in the perspective of improving psychosocial learning environments and subsequent completion of upper secondary schooling.
The trial was retrospectively registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov register on December 22.2017: NCT03382080 .
Notes
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PubMed ID
29523124 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness and quality of life of a diet intervention postpartum: 2-year results from a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298420
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jan 08; 19(1):38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-08-2019
Author
Lars Hagberg
Anna Winkvist
Hilde K Brekke
Fredrik Bertz
Else Hellebö Johansson
Ena Huseinovic
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Care Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jan 08; 19(1):38
Date
Jan-08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Obesity - diet therapy
Postpartum Period
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Weight Reduction Programs - economics
Abstract
Pregnancy has been identified as a contributor to obesity. We have shown that a diet intervention postpartum produced a 2-y weight loss of 8%. Here, we present the impact of the diet intervention on cost-effectiveness and explore changes in quality of life (QOL).
A total of 110 postpartum women with overweight/obesity were randomly assigned to diet (D-group) or control (C-group). D-group received a 12-wk diet intervention within primary health care followed by monthly emails up to the 1-y follow-up. C-group received a brochure. Changes in QOL were measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey and EQ-5D. The analysis of cost-effectiveness was a cost-utility analysis with a health care perspective and included costs of intervention for stakeholder, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained and savings in health care. The likelihood of cost-effectiveness was examined using the net monetary benefit method.
The D-group increased their QOL more than the C-group at 12 wk. and 1 y, with pronounced differences for the dimensions general health and mental health, and the mental component summary score (all p?
PubMed ID
30621673 View in PubMed
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Early food for future health: a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an eHealth intervention aiming to promote healthy food habits from early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290059
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 20; 17(1):729
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-20-2017
Author
Christine Helle
Elisabet Rudjord Hillesund
Mona Linge Omholt
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. christine.helle@uia.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 20; 17(1):729
Date
09-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Feeding Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - psychology
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine
Abstract
Childhood overweight and obesity is a global public health challenge. Primary prevention initiatives targeting parents have been called for to encourage a positive feeding environment and healthy eating habits that may lay a good foundation for future health. At the same time, there is a need for interventions which combine accessibility and scalability with cost effectiveness. Today's parents are extensive Internet-users, but only a few randomized controlled trials have investigated the use of Internet to promote healthy eating habits in early childhood. In Early Food for Future Health we have developed and will evaluate an Internet-based tool for parents of children between 6 and 12 months, aiming to increase knowledge about infant nutrition and foster protective feeding behavior.
During springtime 2016, parents of children aged between 3 and 5 months were recruited through Norwegian child health centres and announcements on Facebook. After completing the baseline questionnaire, 718 parents were individually randomized to intervention- or control group. The intervention group received monthly emails with links to an age-appropriate web-site when their child was between 6 and 12 months. The control group received ordinary care from the child health centres. The data-collection is ongoing. All participants will be followed up at ages 12 and possibly 24 and 48 months, with questionnaires relating to eating behaviour and feeding practices, food variety and diet quality.
Providing guidance and counseling to parents of infants is an important task for health authorities and the public child health services. Early Food for Future health is an intervention focusing on promoting early healthy food-habits which may prevent childhood overweight and obesity. If proven to be effective, Early Food for Future Health can be used by parents and public health nurses for supplementary guidance on feeding practices and diet. This study has the potential to provide greater insight and understanding regarding early parental feeding practices, child eating behavior and the development and efficacy of Internet-based public health interventions.
ISRCTN13601567 .
Notes
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PubMed ID
28931384 View in PubMed
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Sick-listed workers' expectations about and experiences with independent medical evaluation: a qualitative interview study from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294988
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2018 Jun; 36(2):134-141
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Aase Aamland
Silje Maeland
Author Affiliation
a Research Unit for General Practice , Uni Research Health , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2018 Jun; 36(2):134-141
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Communication
Female
General practitioners
Humans
Independent Medical Evaluation
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Return to work
Sick Leave
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
To reduce the country's sick leave rate, Norwegian politicians have suggested independent medical evaluations (IMEs) for sick-listed workers. IME was tested in a large, randomized controlled trial in one Norwegian county (Evaluation of IME in Norway, or 'the NIME trial'). The current study´s aim was to explore sick-listed workers' expectations about and experiences with participating in an IME.
Nine individual semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted. Our convenience sample included six women and three men, aged 35-59 years, who had diverse medical reasons for being on sick leave. Systematic text condensation was used for analysis.
The participants questioned both the IME purpose and timing, but felt a moral obligation to participate. Inadequate information provided by their general practitioner (GP) to the IME doctor was considered burdensome by several participants. However, most participants appreciated the IME as a positive discussion, even if they did not feel it had any impact on their follow-up or return-to-work process.
According to the sick-listed workers the IMEs were administered too late and disturbed already initiated treatment processes and return to work efforts. Still, the consultation with the IME doctor was rated as a positive encounter, contrary to their expectations. Our results diverge from findings in other countries where experiences with IME consultations have been reported as predominantly negative. These findings, along with additional, upcoming evaluations, will serve as a basis for the Norwegian government's decision about whether to implement IMEs on a regular basis. Key points  Independent medical evaluations for sick-listed workers has been tested out in a large Norwegian RCT and will be evaluated through qualitative interviews with participating stakeholders and by assessing the effects on RTW and costs/benefits. In this study, we explored sick-listed workers' expectations about and experiences with participating in an IME. • Participants questioned both the IME purpose and timing, but felt a moral obligation to participate. • Inadequate information provided by their general practitioner (GP) to the IME doctor was considered burdensome by several participants • Sick-listed workers appreciated the IME as a positive discussion, even if they did not feel it had any impact on their follow-up or return-to-work process.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29644920 View in PubMed
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