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1165 records – page 1 of 117.

Norway: development of palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188544
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2002 Aug;24(2):211-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Stein Kaasa
Harald Breivik
Marit Jordhøy
Author Affiliation
Unit for Applied Clinical Research and Palliative Medicine Unit, and Norwegian University of Science and Technology Unit, NTNU, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2002 Aug;24(2):211-4
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Program Development
PubMed ID
12231148 View in PubMed
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A journey into school health promotion: district implementation of the health promoting schools approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131459
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Mar;27(1):82-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Doug Gleddie
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Education, Grant MacEwan University, 10700-104 Ave., Edmonton, AB, Canada. gleddied@macewan.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Mar;27(1):82-9
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Program Development
Schools
Abstract
The health-promoting schools approach has gained momentum in the last decade with many jurisdictions providing guidelines and frameworks for general implementation. Although general agreement exists as to the broad strokes needed for effectiveness, less apparent are local implementation designs and models. The Battle River Project was designed to explore one such local implementation strategy for a provincial (Alberta, Canada) health promoting schools program. Located in the Battle River School Division, the project featured a partnership between Ever Active Schools, the school division and the local health authority. Case study was used to come to a greater understanding of how the health promoting schools approach worked in this particular school authority and model. Three themes emerged: participation, coordination and, integration.
PubMed ID
21903687 View in PubMed
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[The main directions of implementation of program of health care modernization in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259443
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Gridnev
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):27-30
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Humans
Moscow
Program development - standards
Abstract
The article considers main-directions of development of Moscow health care including implementation of program of modernization of metropolitan health care and three-level system of medical care support of population.
PubMed ID
25373295 View in PubMed
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[The development of a state anticancer program].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216643
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1995;41(2):35-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

The development of the National Diabetes Surveillance System (NDSS) in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193456
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2001;22(2):67-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
C. Clottey
F. Mo
B. LeBrun
P. Mickelson
J. Niles
G. Robbins
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2001;22(2):67-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Humans
Population Surveillance - methods
Program Development
PubMed ID
11525722 View in PubMed
Less detail

Communicable disease epidemiology training in Northern Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7427
Source
Euro Surveill. 2001 Mar;6(3):47-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
P. Aavitsland
S. Andresen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2001 Mar;6(3):47-50
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Epidemiology - education
Finland
Forecasting
Iceland
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Scandinavia
Abstract
The five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) have a long tradition of collaboration in communicable disease epidemiology and control. The state epidemiologists and the immunisation programme managers have met regularly to discuss common challenges and exchange experiences in surveillance and control of communicable diseases. After the three Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) regained independence in 1991 and the Soviet Union dissolved, contacts were made across the old iron curtain in several areas, such as culture, education, business, military and medicine. Each of the Nordic communicable disease surveillance institutes started projects with partners in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania or the Russian Federation. The projects were in such diverse areas as HIV surveillance and prevention, vaccination programmes and antibiotic resistance.
PubMed ID
11682716 View in PubMed
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Linking research activities with policy and program design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223518
Source
Can J Public Health. 1992 Jul-Aug;83(4):259
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Hyndman
Source
Can J Public Health. 1992 Jul-Aug;83(4):259
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Poverty
Program Development
Notes
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 1992 May-Jun;83(3):181-31525740
PubMed ID
1423103 View in PubMed
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Reaching out: bringing the human factor back to dialysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222336
Source
J CANNT. 1993;3(2):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J. Olson
L. Cielen
Source
J CANNT. 1993;3(2):17-20
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hemodialysis, Home - methods
Humans
Manitoba
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Program Development
Abstract
Prior to the early 1980s, two Winnipeg hospitals provided hemodialysis for all patients in Manitoba with chronic renal failure. Because no other hemodialysis centres existed, families were forced to relocate to the city. Because of these factors, the Manitoba Renal Failure Advisory Committee proposed the development of an outreach hemodialysis program. Under the auspices of the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg, this outreach program has evolved into the current Manitoba Local Centre Dialysis Program. Hemodialysis services are now available in an additional seven health care centres throughout Manitoba and northwestern Ontario. This program has benefited many and in some instances, families previously separated by distances of up to 500 miles have been reunited. Creativity has been one of the most essential ingredients in the evolution of this unique program.
PubMed ID
8148207 View in PubMed
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[The development of public health strategy with the purpose to develop human capital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116676
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;(4):10-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
A I Babenko
Iu I Bravve
A L Tomchuk
E A Babenko
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Jul-Aug;(4):10-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Program Development
Public Health - trends
Russia
Social Support
Abstract
The article substantiates the necessity to develop public health strategy considering the processes of demographic, social, economic progression of society. The core issue in these conditions is human capital and its component--health capital as an integral reflection of different characteristics of population. The definitions of these notions in a social hygienic aspect are presented. The main stages of development of the health strategy such as formation of strategic planning elements, human capital valuation, population health and health capital losses, evaluation of potential demand in medical technologies, medical organizational measures implementation and their input into development of human capital are considered. These positions are supported as determinants of effectiveness of health strategy.
PubMed ID
23373334 View in PubMed
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Medical faculty and curriculum design - 'No, no, it's like this: You give your lectures ...'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148124
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Jul;31(7):642-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Anne Mette Morcke
Berit Eika
Author Affiliation
Medical Education Unit, Aarhus University, Denmark. amm@medu.au.dk
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Jul;31(7):642-8
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Denmark
Faculty, Medical
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Program Development
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to understand more completely the (tacit) curriculum design models of medical faculty. We report on two research questions: (1) Can medical faculty give an account of their curriculum design assumptions? and (2) What are their assumptions concerning curriculum design?
We conducted an explorative, qualitative case study. We interviewed educational decision makers at the three Danish medical schools and associate professors from different courses concerning curriculum design. We carried out four individual, in-depth interviews and four focus groups with 20 participants in all.
Only one decision maker had an explicit curriculum design model. However, all participants had assumptions concerning curriculum design. We displayed their assumptions as five essentially different and increasingly complex models: the method-driven, pragmatically driven content-driven, outcome-driven and vision-driven curriculum design models. In the five models, the role of learning outcomes differs. The differences range from a belief that learning outcomes are essential, to a belief that learning outcomes are unimportant, to a belief that learning outcomes are incompatible with higher education. Finally, we found that teachers do not necessarily play a clear, central role in curriculum design.
PubMed ID
19811148 View in PubMed
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1165 records – page 1 of 117.