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Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
William H Ryding
Author Affiliation
Hastings and Prince Edward Counties Health Unit, Belleville, Ontario, Canada. bryding@hpechu.on.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Care - economics - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
National Health Programs
Poverty
PubMed ID
16480604 View in PubMed
Less detail

3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132831
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ostlund M
Dahlbäck N
Petersson GI
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. martin.ostlund@lnu.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information.
To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker.
We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features.
In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P
Notes
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Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1981;20(3):193-2007286037
PubMed ID
21771714 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for back and neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61395
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jensen IB
Bergström G
Ljungquist T
Bodin L
Author Affiliation
Section for Personal Injury Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Box 127 18, 112 94 Stockholm, Sweden. irene.jensen@cns.ki.se
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Cognitive Therapy
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Pensions
Physical Therapy (Specialty) - economics - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Rehabilitation - economics - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of a behavioural medicine rehabilitation programme and the outcome of its two main components, compared to a 'treatment-as-usual' control group. The study employed a 4 x 5 repeated-measures design with four groups and five assessment periods during a 3-year follow-up. The group studied consisted of blue-collar and service/care workers on sick leave, identified in a nationwide health insurance scheme in Sweden. After inclusion, the subjects were randomised to one of the four conditions: behaviour-oriented physiotherapy (PT), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), behavioural medicine rehabilitation consisting of PT+CBT (BM) and a 'treatment-as-usual' control group (CG). Outcome variables were sick leave, early retirement and health-related quality of life. A cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing the programmes, was made. The results showed, consistently, the full-time behavioural medicine programme being superior to the three other conditions. The strongest effect was found on females. Regarding sick leave, the mean difference in the per-protocol analysis between the BM programme and the control group was 201 days, thus reducing sick leave by about two-thirds of a working year. Rehabilitating women has a substantial impact on costs for production losses, whereas rehabilitating men seem to be effortless with no significant effect on either health or costs. In conclusion, a full-time behavioural medicine programme is a cost-effective method for improving health and increasing return to work in women working in blue-collar or service/care occupations and suffering from back/neck pain.
PubMed ID
15911154 View in PubMed
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3-year impact of a provincial choking prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166017
Source
J Otolaryngol. 2006 Aug;35(4):216-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Nathalie Després
Annie Lapointe
Marie-Claude Quintal
Pierre Arcand
Chantal Giguère
Anthony Abela
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 2006 Aug;35(4):216-21
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Foreign Bodies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the impact of a provincial choking prevention program (CPP) on the incidence of aerodigestive foreign body cases among children.
The CPP, including posters, pamphlets, an informative video, and annual participation in the Parents & Kids Fair, was launched throughout Quebec in October 1999. The incidence rates of aerodigestive foreign body cases prior to implementation (during 1997-1998) and subsequently (2000-2002) within the province and our tertiary care centre (Sainte-Justine Hospital) were compared by estimating incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).
No significant changes in the incidence of aerodigestive foreign body cases after program implementation were observed in our hospital (age-adjusted IRR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79-1.07). The provincial rates were higher after program implementation (age-adjusted IRR 1.15, 95% CI 1.05-1.25).
To influence choking prevention habits, modifications to the campaign are required. Strategies are discussed.
PubMed ID
17176795 View in PubMed
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3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101097
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Author
Macnab, AJ
Rozmus, J
Benton, D
Gagnon, FA
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Hartley Bay Nursing Station, Hartley Bay, British Columbia, Canada
Gagnon Research Associates, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal children
Brush-ins
Canada
Collaborative program
Cross-sectional study
Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score
Dental health
Educational presentations
First Nations
Fluoride application
Oral health and knowledge
Recognition/incentive scheme
School-based program
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.RESULTS: Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness, part 1: contextualizing case management for ending homelessness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130590
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, AB, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management
Community Health Services
Concept Formation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Homeless Persons
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, organizational
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and part-2 articulates the 6 Dimensions of Quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are: (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
21986969 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10 year asthma programme in Finland: major change for the better.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168103
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
T. Haahtela
L E Tuomisto
A. Pietinalho
T. Klaukka
M. Erhola
M. Kaila
M M Nieminen
E. Kontula
L A Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P O Box 160, FIN-00029 HUS, Finland. tari.haahtela@hus.fi
Source
Thorax. 2006 Aug;61(8):663-70
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Communication
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - economics - organization & administration - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Insurance, Disability - economics
Interprofessional Relations
National Health Programs - economics - trends
Pharmaceutical Services - standards
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A National Asthma Programme was undertaken in Finland from 1994 to 2004 to improve asthma care and prevent an increase in costs. The main goal was to lessen the burden of asthma to individuals and society.
The action programme focused on implementation of new knowledge, especially for primary care. The main premise underpinning the campaign was that asthma is an inflammatory disease and requires anti-inflammatory treatment from the outset. The key for implementation was an effective network of asthma-responsible professionals and development of a post hoc evaluation strategy. In 1997 Finnish pharmacies were included in the Pharmacy Programme and in 2002 a Childhood Asthma mini-Programme was launched.
The incidence of asthma is still increasing, but the burden of asthma has decreased considerably. The number of hospital days has fallen by 54% from 110 000 in 1993 to 51 000 in 2003, 69% in relation to the number of asthmatics (n = 135 363 and 207 757, respectively), with the trend still downwards. In 1993, 7212 patients of working age (9% of 80 133 asthmatics) received a disability pension from the Social Insurance Institution compared with 1741 in 2003 (1.5% of 116 067 asthmatics). The absolute decrease was 76%, and 83% in relation to the number of asthmatics. The increase in the cost of asthma (compensation for disability, drugs, hospital care, and outpatient doctor visits) ended: in 1993 the costs were 218 million euro which had fallen to 213.5 million euro in 2003. Costs per patient per year have decreased 36% (from 1611 euro to 1031 euro).
It is possible to reduce the morbidity of asthma and its impact on individuals as well as on society. Improvements would have taken place without the programme, but not of this magnitude.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16877690 View in PubMed
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The 10-year COPD Programme in Finland: effects on quality of diagnosis, smoking, prevalence, hospital admissions and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135938
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Vuokko L Kinnula
Tuula Vasankari
Eva Kontula
Anssi Sovijarvi
Olli Saynajakangas
Anne Pietinalho
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. vuokko.kinnula@helsinki.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish National Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 1998-2007 was set up to reduce the prevalence of COPD, improve COPD diagnosis and care, reduce the number of moderate to severe cases of the disease, and reduce hospitalisations and treatment costs due to COPD. Over 900 events for 25,000 participating healthcare workers were arranged. The major strengths of this programme included multidisciplinary strategies and web-based guidelines in nearly all primary health care centres around the country.
Data from national registries, epidemiological studies and questionnaires were used to measure whether the goals had been reached.
The prevalence of COPD remained unchanged. Smoking decreased in males from 30% to 26% (p
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):109-1021603847
PubMed ID
21431275 View in PubMed
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A 10-year population-based cohort analysis of cataract surgery rates in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162363
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2007 Aug;42(4):552-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Wendy V Hatch
Geta Cernat
Shaun Singer
Chaim M Bell
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2007 Aug;42(4):552-6
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - epidemiology
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We studied the rates and distribution of cataract surgery throughout Ontario using population-based administrative data.
We identified patients who had had cataract surgery performed between April 1, 1994, and March 31, 2005. We calculated crude cataract surgery rates, overall and regional adjusted rates per 100,000 residents aged 65 and over, and age- and sex-specific rates.
The number of cataract surgeries performed on patients over 65 more than doubled, from 43,818 to 90,183, over the 10-year period and accounted for approximately 81% of all cataract surgeries in Ontario. Age- and sex-adjusted rates varied considerably among health administrative geographic regions. For 2004-2005, rates including all cataract surgeries ranged from 4272 to 6563 cataract surgeries per 100,000 residents aged 65 or older.
There has been a significant increase in the number of cataract surgeries performed over the past decade in Ontario with considerable regional variation. Observed rates were higher than those reported for other countries.
PubMed ID
17641696 View in PubMed
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7243 records – page 1 of 725.