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959 records – page 1 of 96.

[3rd Report from Birgitta Hospital: care project and reaction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256327
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Apr 14;68(16):1826-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-1971
Source
CANNT J. 2013 Apr-Jun;23(2):59-60
Publication Type
Article

The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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The 'ability' paradigm in vocational rehabilitation: challenges in an Ontario injured worker retraining program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131610
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
E. MacEachen
A. Kosny
S. Ferrier
K. Lippel
C. Neilson
R L Franche
D. Pugliese
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. emaceachen@iwh.on.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics - methods
Workers' Compensation - organization & administration
Abstract
In recent years, a focus on workers' ability, rather than impairment, has guided disability management services. However, a challenge with the notion of 'ability' is identification of the border between ability and inability. This article considers this gray zone of disability management in the case of a workers' compensation vocational retraining program for injured workers in Ontario.
In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of 71 participants who were directly involved with the vocational retraining process. Workers in the program had on average incurred injury 3 years earlier. Procedural and legal documents were also analyzed. Principles of grounded theory and discourse analysis guided the data gathering and analysis.
A program focus on worker abilities did not allow for consideration of unresolved medical problems. Concepts such as maximum medical rehabilitation distracted attention from workers' ongoing chronic and unstable health situations, and incentive levers to employers directed some of the least capable workers into the program. As well, communication pathways for discussing health problems were limited by rules and provider reluctance to reveal problems. Therefore, workers completing the program were deemed 'employable', while ongoing and problematic health conditions preventing employment remained relatively uncharted and invisible.
This study reinforces how the shift in disability management paradigm to a focus on ability and return to work requires consideration of environmental conditions, including policies and programs and implementation. A focus on the environment in which worker ability can be enacted might be as important as a focus on improving individual worker characteristics.
PubMed ID
21894535 View in PubMed
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The Aboriginal tea ceremony: its relevance to psychiatric practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160645
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ernest Hunter
Author Affiliation
Remote Area Mental Health Service, Queensland Health, Queensland, Australia. Ernest_hunter@health.qld.gov.au
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Ceremonial Behavior
Culture
Drinking Behavior
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Physician's Practice Patterns
Professional-Patient Relations
Tea
Abstract
To examine the elements of the Aboriginal tea ceremony and its relevance to psychiatric practice.
Through the Aboriginal tea ceremony, the mental health professional is able to convey that care and concern balance experience and expertise. These underpinning principles have wide application.
PubMed ID
17957527 View in PubMed
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[Abuse of women. Clergy. Women are secretly ashamed about abuse]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75367
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1985 Jan 9;85(2):23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1985
Author
T. Hegner
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1985 Jan 9;85(2):23-5
Date
Jan-9-1985
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Pastoral Care
Professional-Patient Relations
Spouse Abuse
PubMed ID
3848200 View in PubMed
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Access to dental care for low-income adults: perceptions of affordability, availability and acceptability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134419
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bruce B Wallace
Michael I Macentee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, 2199 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada. bbw@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community Health Services - economics
Dental Care - economics
Dentists - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Poverty
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Work
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore access to dental care for low-income communities from the perspectives of low-income people, dentists and related health and social service-providers. The case study included 60 interviews involving, low-income adults (N = 41), dentists (N = 6) and health and social service-providers (N = 13). The analysis explores perceptions of need, evidence of unmet needs, and three dimensions of access--affordability, availability and acceptability. The study describes the sometimes poor fit between private dental practice and the public oral health needs of low-income individuals. Dentists and low-income patients alike explained how the current model of private dental practice and fee-for-service payments do not work well because of patients' concerns about the cost of dentistry, dentists' reluctance to treat this population, and the cultural incompatibility of most private practices to the needs of low-income communities. There is a poor fit between private practice dentistry, public dental benefits and the oral health needs of low-income communities, and other responses are needed to address the multiple dimensions of access to dentistry, including community dental clinics sensitive to the special needs of low-income people.
PubMed ID
21590434 View in PubMed
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Access to osteoporosis treatment is critically linked to access to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161794
Source
Med Care. 2007 Sep;45(9):896-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Suzanne M Cadarette
Monique A M Gignac
Susan B Jaglal
Dorcas E Beaton
Gillian A Hawker
Author Affiliation
Osteoporosis Research Program, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. s.cadarette@utoronto.ca
Source
Med Care. 2007 Sep;45(9):896-901
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - utilization
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mass Screening - utilization
Ontario - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
To determine if inequities in access to osteoporosis investigation [dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) testing] and treatment (bisphosphonate, calcitonin, and/or raloxifene) exist among older women in a region with universal health care coverage.
Community-dwelling women aged 65-89 years residing within 2 regions of Ontario, Canada were randomly sampled. Data were collected by standardized telephone interview. Potential correlates of DXA testing (verified by physician records), and current treatment were grouped by type as: "predisposing characteristics," "enabling resources," or "need factors" based on hypothesized relationships formulated before data collection. Variables associated with each outcome independent of "need factors" identified inequities in the system.
Of the 871 participants (72% response rate), 55% had been tested by DXA and 20% were receiving treatment. Using multiple variable logistic regression to adjust for need factors, significant inequities in access to DXA testing existed by age, health beliefs, education, income, use of preventive health services, region, and provider sex. DXA testing mediated access to treatment; 34% of those having had a DXA were treated compared with 2% of those who did not. Among women with osteoporosis, correctly reporting that their DXA test indicated osteoporosis and higher perceived benefits of taking pharmacological agents for osteoporosis were associated with treatment.
Significant inequities in access to fracture prevention exist in a region with universal health care coverage. Improved access to DXA and better communication to patients of both their DXA results and the benefits of treatment has the potential to reduce the burden of osteoporosis.
PubMed ID
17712261 View in PubMed
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Accounts of pain experience in an elderly care context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146404
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):55-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ulla Hellström Muhli
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Commun Med. 2010;7(1):55-64
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Narration
Pain - psychology
Pain Measurement
Professional-Patient Relations
Psycholinguistics
Qualitative Research
Sociometric Techniques
Sweden
Abstract
This article aims to show how a discourse and communication based approach in the context of the care of the elderly provides a basis for reflecting on pain. Based on six hours of data from talk encounters between care professionals and elderly clients, an activity analysis of institutional settings and categorization of interactional discourse was undertaken. The focus was: (a) how elderly people initiated painful accounts, and (b) how the professionals oriented to such accounts. It is found that pain-talks are governed by the institutional practice of different phases:framing; mapping troubles and symptoms; clients' self presentations; counseling, and concluding. This phase structure exemplifies knowledge of communicative activities and is part of practical knowledge which the party, or at least the professional, is expected to become acquainted with. A thematic interactional map of critical moments related to pain as (a) social death and hope, and (b) presentation of self as past and self as present emerges. The caring aspect is to support hope and to change the focus from social death to life and recovering. In foregrounding health, it is important for the elderly people to affirm their identity of themselves as being good and honest persons.
PubMed ID
21462857 View in PubMed
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959 records – page 1 of 96.