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608 records – page 1 of 61.

229 people, 15,000 body parts: pathologists help solve Swissair 111's grisly puzzles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203179
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1999
Author
N. Robb
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Date
Jan-26-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coroners and Medical Examiners - psychology
DNA Fingerprinting
Family - psychology
Grief
Humans
Nova Scotia
Professional-Family Relations
Abstract
Only 1 of the 229 passengers and crew members killed when Swissair Flight 111 crashed off Nova Scotia in September was visually identifiable. Identifying everyone else on board involved medical and dental detective work of the first order.
PubMed ID
9951448 View in PubMed
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Absorbing information about a child's incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96768
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patrizia Lannen
Joanne Wolfe
Jennifer Mack
Erik Onelov
Ullakarin Nyberg
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Author Affiliation
Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess parents' ability to absorb information that their child's cancer was incurable and to identify factors associated with parents' ability to absorb this information. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An anonymous mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August and October of 2001. 449 parents who lost a child to cancer 4-9 years earlier (response rate 80%) completed the survey. 191 (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers and 251 (56%) were mothers. RESULTS: Sixty percent of parents (n = 258) reported that they were able to absorb the information that their child's illness was incurable. Parents were better able to absorb this information when the information was given in an appropriate manner (RR 1.6; CI 1.3-2.0), when they shared their problems with others during the child's illness course (RR 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) and when they had no history of depression (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.8). Parents who reported that they were able to absorb the information were more likely to have expressed their farewells to the child in their desired manner (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Parents who received information that their child's illness was incurable in an appropriate manner are more likely to absorb that information. Whether or not parents are able to absorb the information that their child's cancer is incurable has implications in terms of preparation for the child's impending death.
PubMed ID
20523086 View in PubMed
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Activities of counsellors in a hospice/palliative care environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191781
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Thompson
C. Rose
W. Wainwright
L. Mattar
M. Scanlan
Author Affiliation
Victoria Hospice Society, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Social Support
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This study examined activities related to the provision of psychosocial care by counsellors in the hospice/palliative care setting. A qualitative design using written reports was used in an urban Canadian hospice/palliative care program. A convenient sample of 13 counsellors indicated the activities they typically performed in their work with patients and families. Thematic analysis of the activities directly related to patient and family care was performed and then validated by presenting these activities back to the counsellors in a group setting. Seven themes resulted: 1) companioning; 2) psychosocial assessment, planning, and evaluation; 3) counselling interventions; 4) facilitation and advocacy; 5) patient and family education; 6) consultation and reporting; and 7) team support. These thematic findings confirmed those of previous studies and also highlighted two additional findings. Team support was seen as an activity that directly affected client care, and there was a strong emphasis on the activity of companioning the dying and their families. Also discussed are implications of these results, as well as suggestions for further research.
PubMed ID
11813339 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and implementation of the nurse-family partnership in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Susan M Jack
Dianne Busser
Debbie Sheehan
Andrea Gonzalez
Emily J Zwygers
Harriet L Macmillan
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. jacksm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
International agencies are required to adapt, pilot and then evaluate the effectiveness of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) prior to broad implementation of this public health intervention. The objectives of this qualitative case study were to: 1) determine whether the NFP can be implemented in Canada with fidelity to the US model, and 2) identify the adaptations required to increase the acceptability of the intervention for service providers and families.
108 low-income, first-time mothers in Hamilton, Ontario, received the NFP intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with NFP clients (n=38), family members (n=14) and community professionals (n=24).
Hamilton, Ontario.INTERVENTION AND DATA COLLECTION: An intensive nurse home visitation program delivered to women starting early in pregnancy and continuing until the child was two years old. Processes to adapt and implement the NFP were explored across seven focus groups with public health nurses and managers. Eighty documents were reviewed to identify implementation challenges. Data were analyzed using directed content analysis.
The NFP model elements are acceptable to Canadian health care providers, public health nurses and families receiving the intervention. The primary adaptation required was to reduce nurse caseloads from 25 to 20 active clients. Recommendations for adapting and implementing all model elements are described.
The NFP model requires minor adaptations to increase the acceptability of the intervention to Canadian stakeholders. A consistent approach to adapting the NFP program in Canada is necessary as provincial jurisdictions commit themselves to supporting an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of the NFP.
PubMed ID
23618049 View in PubMed
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Addressing spouses' unique needs after cardiac surgery when recovery is complicated by heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149887
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susanna Agren
Gunilla Hollman Frisman
Sören Berg
Rolf Svedjeholm
Anna Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping S-58185, Sweden. susanna.agren@liu.se
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Empathy
Female
Heart Failure - etiology - nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Professional-Family Relations
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Cardiac surgery places extensive stress on spouses who often are more worried than the patients themselves. Spouses can experience difficult and demanding situations when the partner becomes critically ill.
To identify, describe, and conceptualize the individual needs of spouses of patients with complications of heart failure after cardiac surgery.
Grounded theory using a mix of systematic coding, data analysis, and theoretical sampling was performed. Spouses, 10 women and 3 men between 39 and 85 years, were interviewed.
During analysis, the core category of confirmation was identified as describing the individual needs of the spouses. The core category theoretically binds together three underlying subcategories: security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength. Confirmation facilitated acceptance and improvement of mental and physical health among spouses.
By identifying spouses' needs for security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength, health care professionals can confirm these needs throughout the caring process, from the critical care period and throughout rehabilitation at home. Interventions to confirm spouses' needs are important because they are vital to the patients' recovery.
PubMed ID
19577699 View in PubMed
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Adolescent care. Part 2: communication and referral practices of family physicians caring for adolescents with mental health problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165305
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1442-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Brigitte Maheux
Andrée Gilbert
Nancy Haley
Jean-Yves Frappier
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. brigitte.maheux@umontreal.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1442-3
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Communication
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family
Private Practice
Professional-Family Relations
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To document with whom family physicians communicate when evaluating adolescents with mental health problems, to whom they refer these adolescents, and their knowledge and perceptions of the accessibility of mental health services in their communities.
Mailed survey completed anonymously.
Province of Quebec.
All general practitioners who reported seeing at least 10 adolescents weekly (n = 255) among 707 physicians who participated in a larger survey on adolescent mental health care in general practice.
Whether family physicians communicated with people (such as parents, teachers, or school nurses) when evaluating adolescents with mental health problems. Number of adolescents referred to mental health services during the last year. Knowledge of mental health services in the community and perception of their accessibility.
When asked about the last 5 adolescents seen with symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts, depending on type of practice, 9% to 19% of physicians reported routinely communicating with parents, and 22% to 32% reported not contacting parents. Between 16% and 43% of physicians referred 5 adolescents or fewer to mental health services during a 12-month period. Most practitioners reported being adequately informed about the mental health services available in their local community clinics. Few physicians knew about services offered by private-practice psychologists, child psychiatrists, or community groups. Respondents perceived mental health services in community clinics (CLSCs) as the most accessible and child psychiatrists as the least accessible services.
Few physicians routinely contact parents when evaluating adolescents with serious mental health problems. Collaboration between family physicians and mental health professionals could be improved. The few referrals made to mental health professionals might indicate barriers to mental health services that could mean many adolescents do not receive the care they need. The lack of access to mental health services, notably to child psychiatrists, reported by most respondents could explain why some physicians choose not to refer adolescents.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17279203 View in PubMed
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Adoption of the children's obesity clinic's treatment (TCOCT) protocol into another Danish pediatric obesity treatment clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269068
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sebastian W Most
Birgitte Højgaard
Grete Teilmann
Jesper Andersen
Mette Valentiner
Michael Gamborg
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Protocols
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Parenting
Pediatric Obesity - psychology - therapy
Professional-Family Relations
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Social Class
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Treating severe childhood obesity has proven difficult with inconsistent treatment results. This study reports the results of the implementation of a childhood obesity chronic care treatment protocol.
Patients aged 5 to 18 years with a body mass index (BMI) above the 99th percentile for sex and age were eligible for inclusion. At baseline patients' height, weight, and tanner stages were measured, as well as parents' socioeconomic status (SES) and family structure. Parental weight and height were self-reported. An individualised treatment plan including numerous advices was developed in collaboration with the patient and the family. Patients' height and weight were measured at subsequent visits. There were no exclusion criteria.
Three-hundred-thirteen (141 boys) were seen in the clinic in the period of February 2010 to March 2013. At inclusion, the median age of patients was 11.1 years and the median BMI standard deviation score (SDS) was 3.24 in boys and 2.85 in girls. After 1 year of treatment, the mean BMI SDS difference was -0.30 (95% CI: -0.39; -0.21, p
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 May;91(5):1165-7120219965
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Oct;124(4):1060-819786444
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2010 Nov;99(11):1675-820528793
Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 Jan;127(1):e164-7021149433
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 Feb;12(2):131-4120122135
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Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Dec;120 Suppl 4:S164-9218055651
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Cites: Lancet. 2010 May 15;375(9727):1737-4820451244
PubMed ID
25884714 View in PubMed
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Advanced palliative home care: next-of-kin's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18088
Source
J Palliat Med. 2003 Oct;6(5):749-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Anna Milberg
Peter Strang
Maria Carlsson
Susanne Börjesson
Author Affiliation
Linköpings Universitet, Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Research Unit, Linköping, Sweden. anna.milberg@lio.se
Source
J Palliat Med. 2003 Oct;6(5):749-56
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - psychology
Comparative Study
Family - psychology
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
GOALS: (1). To describe what aspects are important when next-of-kin evaluate advanced palliative home care (APHC) and (2). to compare the expressed aspects and describe eventual differences among the three settings, which differed in terms of length of services, geographic location, and population size. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Four to 7 months after the patient's death (87% from cancer), 217 consecutive next-of-kin from three different settings in Sweden responded (response rate 86%) to three open-ended questions via a postal questionnaire. Qualitative content analysis was performed. MAIN RESULTS: Service aspects and comfort emerged as main categories. The staff's competence, attitude and communication, accessibility, and spectrum of services were valued service aspects. Comfort, such as feeling secure, was another important aspect and it concerned the next-of-kin themselves, the patients, and the families. Additionally, comfort was related to interactional issues such as being in the center and sharing caring with the staff. The actual place of care (i.e., being at home) added to the perceived comfort. Of the respondents, 87% described positive aspects of APHC and 28% negative aspects. No major differences were found among the different settings. CONCLUSIONS: Next-of-kin incorporate service aspects and aspects relating to the patient's and family's comfort when evaluating APHC. The importance of these aspects is discussed in relation to the content of palliative care and potential goals.
PubMed ID
14622454 View in PubMed
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A-FROM in action at the Aphasia Institute.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130778
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Aura Kagan
Author Affiliation
Education and Applied Research, Aphasia Institute, Toronto, Canada. akagan@aphasia.ca
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphasia - psychology - rehabilitation
Awareness
Communication
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Motivation
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - trends
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Care Planning
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Indicators, Health Care - trends
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Treatment Outcome
World Health Organization
Abstract
Aphasia centers are in an excellent position to contribute to the broad definition of health by the World Health Organization: the ability to live life to its full potential. An expansion of this definition by the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) forms the basis for a user-friendly and ICF-compatible framework for planning interventions that ensure maximum real-life outcome and impact for people with aphasia and their families. This article describes Living with Aphasia: Framework for Outcome Measurement and its practical application to aphasia centers in the areas of direct service, outcome measurement, and advocacy and awareness. Examples will be drawn from the Aphasia Institute in Toronto. A case will be made for all aphasia centers to use the ICF or an adaptation of it to further the work of this sector and strengthen its credibility.
PubMed ID
21968558 View in PubMed
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Agreement on disease-specific criteria for do-not-resuscitate orders in acute stroke. Members of the Canadian and Western New York Stroke Consortiums.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212814
Source
Stroke. 1996 Feb;27(2):232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
A V Alexandrov
P M Pullicino
E M Meslin
J W Norris
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Buffalo General Hospital, State University of New York, USA.
Source
Stroke. 1996 Feb;27(2):232-7
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Brain Damage, Chronic
Brain diseases
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality - nursing - physiopathology
Consensus
Ethics, Medical
Ethics, Nursing
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
New York
Patient care team
Patient Selection
Physicians
Professional-Family Relations
Prognosis
Resuscitation Orders
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order is a mechanism of withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The lack of DNR guidelines specific for acute stroke may result in many stroke patients receiving unnecessary and futile resuscitation and ventilator-assisted breathing.
A prospective multicenter evaluation of disease-specific criteria for DNR orders in acute stroke was initiated using a modified Delphi process. The participants were the Canadian and Western New York Stroke Consortium members who are closely involved in caring for acute stroke patients and conducting clinical trials at the academic centers. Previously published provisional criteria were reviewed by the participants. Modifications were made to the criteria until statistically significant agreement (P
PubMed ID
8571415 View in PubMed
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608 records – page 1 of 61.