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[A course in USA put traces on professional life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143149
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Apr 28-May 4;107(17):1169-70
Publication Type
Article

Adapted Physical Activity Professionals in Rehabilitation: An Explorative Study in the Norwegian Context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298444
Source
Adapt Phys Activ Q. 2018 Oct 01; 35(4):458-475
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2018
Author
Øyvind F Standal
Tor Erik H Nyquist
Hanne H Mong
Author Affiliation
1 OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University.
Source
Adapt Phys Activ Q. 2018 Oct 01; 35(4):458-475
Date
Oct-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Exercise
Humans
Norway
Professional Practice
Professional Role
Rehabilitation
Abstract
Adapted physical activity (APA) is characterized by a strong orientation to professional practice. Currently, there exists limited empirical research about the professional status of APA in the context of rehabilitation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe and understand the professional status, role, and work tasks of APA specialists in Norway. For the purpose of the study, the authors conducted group interviews with APA specialists and individual interviews with unit leaders at six rehabilitation institutions in the national specialist health care services. The results highlight the content of the work tasks, the roles in the cross-professional teams, the status in the institutions, and what the participants perceive to be the knowledge base for their profession. Although these results may be specific to the Norwegian context, the authors also discuss possible implications of their findings for APA in an international perspective.
PubMed ID
30366504 View in PubMed
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Addressing the obesity epidemic: what is the dentist's role?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160732
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Oct;73(8):707-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Jean-Philippe Chaput
Jo-Anne Gilbert
Christian Caron
Belinda Nicolau
Angelo Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Division of Kinesiology (PEPS), Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Oct;73(8):707-9
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Dentists
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Professional Role
Risk factors
Tooth Loss - complications
PubMed ID
17949536 View in PubMed
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Alaska pharmacists: First responders to the pandemic in the last frontier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304529
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2021 Jan-Feb; 61(1):e35-e38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Amy K Paul
Talethia Bogart
Ashley R Schaber
Della C Cutchins
Renee F Robinson
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2021 Jan-Feb; 61(1):e35-e38
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
COVID-19 - diagnosis - therapy
COVID-19 Testing
COVID-19 Vaccines - administration & dosage
Emergency Responders
Humans
Pharmaceutical Services - economics - organization & administration
Pharmacists - economics - organization & administration
Professional Role
Students, Pharmacy - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Pharmacists are among the nation's most accessible and underused health professionals. Within their scope of practice, pharmacists can prescribe and administer vaccines, conduct point-of-care testing, and address drug shortages through therapeutic substitutions.
To better use pharmacists as first responders to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), we conducted a needs and capacity assessment to (1) determine individual commitment to provide COVID-19 testing and management services, (2) identify resources required to provide these services, and (3) help prioritize unmet community needs that could be addressed by pharmacists.
In March 2020, pharmacists and student pharmacists within the Alaska Pharmacist Association worked to tailor, administer, and evaluate results from a 10-question survey, including demographics (respondent name, ZIP Code, cell phone, and alternate e-mail). The survey was developed on the basis of published COVID-19 guidelines, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 screening and management guidelines, National Association of Boards of Pharmacy guidance, and joint policy recommendation from pharmacy organizations.
Pharmacies are located in the areas of greatest COVID-19 need in Alaska. Pharmacists are willing and interested in providing support. Approximately 63% of the pharmacists who completed the survey indicated that they were interested in providing COVID-19 nasal testing, 60% were interested in conducting COVID-19 antibody testing, and 93% were interested in prescribing and administering immunizations for COVID-19, as available. When asked about resources needed to enable pharmacists to prescribe antiviral therapy, 37% of the pharmacists indicated they needed additional education or training, and 39% required access to technology to bill and document provided services.
The primary barrier to pharmacists augmenting the current COVID-19 response is an inability to cover the costs of providing these health services. Pharmacists in Alaska are ready to meet COVID-19-related clinical needs if public and private insurers and legislators can help address the barriers to service sustainability.
PubMed ID
33036935 View in PubMed
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An analysis of present dental professions in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79035
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(4):155-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ordell Sven
Unell Lennart
Söderfeldt Björn
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. sven.ordell@lio.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(4):155-64
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Assistants - statistics & numerical data - trends
Dental Health Services - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data - trends
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data - trends
Dentists - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Professional Competence
Professional Role
Sweden
Abstract
Dentistry in Sweden is predicted to have a shortage of dentists in the future and the division of labour within dentistry will be a more debated question. In order to forecast the effects of such a shortage the professional status of the involved groups must be made clearer. The objective of this paper is to analyse the emergence and present professional status of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The study was conducted on the basis of theories on professions, and their roles in organizations was analysed.The results were applied on the historical emergence, establishment and consolidation of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The results show that a large sector of salaried dentists has not diminished the professional status of the Swedish dentists. Professional ambitions such as many clinical subspecialties and a strong element of research have not been restrained by the public health ambitions in the Public Dental Health Service (PDHS). Presently, other dental professions are dental hygienists, dental technicians and dental nurses. Of these the only other licensed group, the dental hygienists, are an emerging profession.They have an uphill struggle to obtain a full professional status, mainly because their knowledge domains are neither specific nor exclusive to their group. Development of a common core curriculum on a clearly academic level would enhance their professional status. Dental technicians and nurses are lacking fundamental traits as professions. There appears to be little need for additional groups of clinical professions besides dentists and dental hygienists in Swedish dentistry. In conclusion,this analysis provided better understanding of the present status of the Swedish dental professions, to prepare for future restructuring of the dental care system. Further work will be needed to understand the impact of professional traits on the management of groups of professionals.
PubMed ID
17243443 View in PubMed
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The anatomy of a forbidden desire: men, penetration and semen exchange.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175938
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Dave Holmes
Dan Warner
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5. dholmes@uottawa.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Condoms - utilization
Drive
Europe
Gift Giving
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Pleasure-Pain Principle
Postmodernism
Professional Role
Psychoanalytic Interpretation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Semen
Symbolism
Taboo - psychology
Unsafe Sex - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The rising popularity of unprotected anal sex (bareback sex) among men who have sex with men (MSM) is perplexing healthcare providers working in sexual health clinics. Epidemiological research on the topic overlooks several socio-cultural and psychological dimensions. Our research attempts to construct an appropriate theoretical edifice by which we can understand this sexual practice. In order to achieve this objective, a qualitative design was selected and 18 semiconductive in-depth interviews were carried out with barebackers from five European and North American cities. We then analyzed the data using two theoretical approaches that were sensitive to the issues of desire, transgression and pleasure. These theories are those of the late French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, and those of poststructural thinkers, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. These theoretical frameworks helped shed light on the significance of bareback sex, and can potentially influence healthcare providers in gaining a better understanding not only of their clients, but also of their own role in the circuitry of desire at work within bareback. We found that while the exchange of semen constitutes a dangerous and irrational practice to healthcare professionals, it is nevertheless a significant variable in the sexual lives of barebackers that needs to be taken into consideration in the provision of healthcare services.
PubMed ID
15743438 View in PubMed
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Anesthesiologists' and surgeons' perceptions about routine pre-operative testing in low-risk patients: application of the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify factors that influence physicians' decisions to order pre-operative tests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123614
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andrea M Patey
Rafat Islam
Jill J Francis
Gregory L Bryson
Jeremy M Grimshaw
Author Affiliation
Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute - General Campus, Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada. apatey@ohri.ca
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:52
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Clinical Competence
Decision Making
Environment
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine
Motivation
Ontario
Perception
Physicians - psychology
Preoperative Care - methods
Professional Role
Risk factors
Abstract
Routine pre-operative tests for anesthesia management are often ordered by both anesthesiologists and surgeons for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was developed to investigate determinants of behaviour and identify potential behaviour change interventions. In this study, the TDF is used to explore anaesthesiologists' and surgeons' perceptions of ordering routine tests for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery.
Sixteen clinicians (eleven anesthesiologists and five surgeons) throughout Ontario were recruited. An interview guide based on the TDF was developed to identify beliefs about pre-operative testing practices. Content analysis of physicians' statements into the relevant theoretical domains was performed. Specific beliefs were identified by grouping similar utterances of the interview participants. Relevant domains were identified by noting the frequencies of the beliefs reported, presence of conflicting beliefs, and perceived influence on the performance of the behaviour under investigation.
Seven of the twelve domains were identified as likely relevant to changing clinicians' behaviour about pre-operative test ordering for anesthesia management. Key beliefs were identified within these domains including: conflicting comments about who was responsible for the test-ordering (Social/professional role and identity); inability to cancel tests ordered by fellow physicians (Beliefs about capabilities and social influences); and the problem with tests being completed before the anesthesiologists see the patient (Beliefs about capabilities and Environmental context and resources). Often, tests were ordered by an anesthesiologist based on who may be the attending anesthesiologist on the day of surgery while surgeons ordered tests they thought anesthesiologists may need (Social influences). There were also conflicting comments about the potential consequences associated with reducing testing, from negative (delay or cancel patients' surgeries), to indifference (little or no change in patient outcomes), to positive (save money, avoid unnecessary investigations) (Beliefs about consequences). Further, while most agreed that they are motivated to reduce ordering unnecessary tests (Motivation and goals), there was still a report of a gap between their motivation and practice (Behavioural regulation).
We identified key factors that anesthesiologists and surgeons believe influence whether they order pre-operative tests routinely for anesthesia management for a healthy adults undergoing low-risk surgery. These beliefs identify potential individual, team, and organisation targets for behaviour change interventions to reduce unnecessary routine test ordering.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22682612 View in PubMed
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An evaluation by the Norwegian Health Care Supervision Authorities of events involving death or injuries in maternity care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299007
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Oct; 97(10):1206-1211
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Lars Thomas Johansen
Geir Sverre Braut
Jan Fredrik Andresen
Pål Øian
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Board of Health Supervision, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Oct; 97(10):1206-1211
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Birth Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Clinical Competence
Female
Fetal Monitoring - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Interprofessional Relations
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Medical Errors - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Obstetrics - standards
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - standards
Pregnancy
Professional Role
Abstract
We aimed to determine how serious adverse events in obstetrics were assessed by supervision authorities.
We selected cases investigated by supervision authorities during 2009-2013. We analyzed information about who reported the event, the outcomes of the mother and infant, and whether events resulted from errors at the individual or system level. We also assessed whether the injuries could have been avoided.
During the study period, there were 303 034 births in Norway, and supervision authorities investigated 338 adverse events in obstetric care. Of these, we studied 207 cases that involved a serious outcome for mother or infant. Five mothers (2.4%) and 88 infants (42.5%) died. Of the 207 events reported to the supervision authorities, patients or relatives reported 65.2%, hospitals reported 39.1%, and others reported 4.3%. In 8.7% of cases, events were reported by more than 1 source. The supervision authority assessments showed that 48.3% of the reported cases involved serious errors in the provision of health care, and a system error was the most common cause. We found that supervision authorities investigated significantly more events in small and medium-sized maternity units than in large units. Eighteen health personnel received reactions; 15 were given a warning, and 3 had their authority limited. We determined that 45.9% of the events were avoidable.
The supervision authorities investigated 1 in 1000 births, mainly in response to complaints issued from patients or relatives. System errors were the most common cause of deficiencies in maternity care.
PubMed ID
29806955 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of pharmacist contribution to an oncology ward in a Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80594
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2006 Jun;12(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Bremberg Eva Rämme
Hising Christina
Nylén Urban
Ehrsson Hans
Eksborg Staffan
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Pharmacy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.bremberg@karolinska.se
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2006 Jun;12(2):75-81
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Drug Utilization - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Nurses
Oncology Service, Hospital
Patient care team
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pharmacists
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - manpower
Physicians
Professional Role
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this project was to establish the importance of a pharmacist in the health-care team in improving drug use in an oncology ward in the Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. METHODS AND PATIENTS: The pharmacist participated in the medical round in the mornings and worked as a member of the health-care team. Drug-related problems (DRPs) were identified by drug chart reviews based on data from medical files, laboratory tests and interviews with patients and/or relatives. A questionnaire to physicians and nurses was used to evaluate their experiences of the pharmacist's contribution to the oncology ward. RESULTS: In total, 114 DRPs were identified in 58 patients. For each DRP, the pharmacist gave proposals for solutions. Sixty-eight suggestions out of 114 (59.6%) were implemented by the physician. Two suggestions (1.8%) were partly followed. For 32 suggestions (28.0%) it was unclear if they had caused any change in medication. Twelve suggestions (10.5%) were not followed. Most of the physicians and nurses acknowledged the pharmacist's contribution to improved drug use in the ward. CONCLUSION: A pharmacist can improve drug use in an oncology ward as a member of the health-care team. The pharmacist contributes with a systematic focus on the patient from a drug perspective.
PubMed ID
16984745 View in PubMed
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400 records – page 1 of 40.