Skip header and navigation

Refine By

68 records – page 1 of 7.

Age- and gender-related differences in clinical productivity among Canadian pediatricians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103234
Source
Pediatrics. 1990 Feb;85(2):144-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
M J Rieder
S J Hanmer
R H Haslam
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 1990 Feb;85(2):144-9
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Efficiency
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - manpower
Physicians, Women
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The desire to control health care costs in Canada has led to reductions in postgraduate training posts and physician immigration. To determine the possible effects of these cutbacks on pediatric manpower, a country-wide study was conducted to assess the practice patterns and productivity of Canadian pediatricians. Of the 1960 pediatricians in Canada, 69% completed and returned our questionnaire. Practice descriptions were as follows: 37% practice primary, 25% secondary, and 38% tertiary care. A total of 70% of Canadian pediatricians are men, although this will change with time because 49% of pediatricians younger than 35 years of age are women. Clinical productivity was assessed by five indices: number of clinical hours, patients seen, consultations provided, and hours on call per week, and number of hospital admissions per year. Younger pediatricians were significantly less clinically productive than older pediatricians. Age-matched groups of female pediatricians were significantly less clinically productive than their male counterparts in three of the five indices assessed. Overall, female pediatricians were significantly more likely to work part-time than were male pediatricians (22% vs 16%, P less than .05). When the clinical productivity of part-time pediatricians was assessed, there was no male to female difference noted. However, among full-time pediatricians, men worked significantly more clinical hours per week and saw significantly more patients than did women (P less than .05). According to results, women pediatricians were more satisfied with their practice now than when starting practice than were men (47% vs 41%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2296501 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the goals of urology residency training: perceptions of practicing urologists in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183593
Source
Can J Urol. 2003 Aug;10(4):1917-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Kevin B Morrison
Neil J McLean
Andrew E MacNeily
Author Affiliation
Division of Urology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Can J Urol. 2003 Aug;10(4):1917-23
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Educational Measurement
Goals
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Social Perception
Urology - education - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In an effort to evaluate the perceived utility of specific Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) urology residency training objectives we conducted a survey of the practicing urologists of British Columbia (BC).
A two page semi-structured survey was designed. Validity was evaluated for clarity, content and ease of completion. The survey was mailed-out to all 61 practicing urologists in BC. The survey population was divided into urban, rural, and academic according to location of practice.
Survey response rate was 79% with varying subgroup rates: urban-69% (20/29), rural-94% (17/18) and academic 86% (12/14). Specific clinical components of training were rated as "useful" by the majority of all respondents: pediatric urology (93%), laparoscopy (88%), TRUS (77%), percutaneous renal access (74%), urethral surgery (72%), microsurgery (62%). Renal transplantation was rated "not useful" by 74% of respondents. TRUS, percutaneous renal access and adrenal surgery were perceived as useful by the majority of those practicing in rural and non-academic urban centers compared to those in academic centers where the majority rated these skills as "not useful". Virtually all non-clinical components of training were rated as "useful". The majority of respondents felt that residency training prepared them for the following challenges: accepting responsibility for patient care, assessing scientific literature, ethical decision-making and communication. The majority of respondents felt that residency did not prepare them for the following challenges: time and office management, hospital administration and providing care within a constrained system.
Specific clinical and non-clinical areas of training have high perceived utility in all settings of practice. Certain clinical components of training have high perceived utility only in specific settings of practice. There are many non-clinical components of practice, which are perceived to be important, but for which BC urologists feel inadequately prepared for by their residency training programs. If consistent across Canada, these findings may facilitate a rational approach to the modification of the objectives for urology residency training.
PubMed ID
14503937 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers to providing palliative care in long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164918
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Apr;52:472-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Kevin Brazil
Michel Bédard
Paul Krueger
Alan Taniguchi
Mary Lou Kelley
Carrie McAiney
Christopher Justice
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. brazilk@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Apr;52:472-3
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Continuing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Facility Environment - statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Manpower
Humans
Long-Term Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Male
Ontario
Palliative Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Physician Executives - statistics & numerical data
Principal Component Analysis
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Residential Facilities - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess challenges in providing palliative care in long-term care (LTC) facilities from the perspective of medical directors.
Cross-sectional mailed survey. A questionnaire was developed, reviewed, pilot-tested, and sent to 450 medical directors representing 531 LTC facilities. Responses were rated on 2 different 5-point scales. Descriptive analyses were conducted on all responses.
All licensed LTC facilities in Ontario with designated medical directors.
Medical directors in the facilities.
Demographic and practice characteristics of physicians and facilities, importance of potential barriers to providing palliative care, strategies that could be helpful in providing palliative care, and the kind of training in palliative care respondents had received.
Two hundred seventy-five medical directors (61%) representing 302 LTC facilities (57%) responded to the survey. Potential barriers to providing palliative care were clustered into 3 groups: facility staff's capacity to provide palliative care, education and support, and the need for external resources. Two thirds of respondents (67.1%) reported that inadequate staffing in their facilities was an important barrier to providing palliative care. Other barriers included inadequate financial reimbursement from the Ontario Health Insurance Program (58.5%), the heavy time commitment required (47.3%), and the lack of equipment in facilities (42.5%). No statistically significant relationship was found between geographic location or profit status of facilities and barriers to providing palliative care. Strategies respondents would use to improve provision of palliative care included continuing medical education (80.0%), protocols for assessing and monitoring pain (77.7%), finding ways to increase financial reimbursement for managing palliative care residents (72.1%), providing educational material for facility staff (70.7%), and providing practice guidelines related to assessing and managing palliative care patients (67.8%).
Medical directors in our study reported that their LTC facilities were inadequately staffed and lacked equipment. The study also highlighted the specialized role of medical directors, who identified continuing medical education as a key strategy for improving provision of palliative care.
Notes
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1997 Autumn;13(3):13-79354036
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 2004 Nov;20(4):717-34, vii15541622
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2003 Apr;6(2):293-612854949
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2003 May-Jun;4(3):145-5112854988
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2004 Mar-Apr;5(2):114-2214984624
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2004 May-Jun;5(3):147-5515115574
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2004 May-Jun;5(3):197-20615115582
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2004 Aug;7(4):533-4415353097
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1993 May;41(5):541-48486889
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 1995 Aug;11(3):343-587585383
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 1995 Aug;11(3):531-457585395
Cites: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 1999 Jul-Aug;16(4):573-8210661065
Cites: Gerontologist. 2000 Feb;40(1):5-1610750309
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 2000 May;16(2):225-3710783426
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2001 Spring;4(1):9-1311291400
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Apr 25;285(16):208111311096
Cites: Gerontologist. 2001 Apr;41(2):153-6011327480
Cites: Med Health R I. 2001 Jun;84(6):195-811434148
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2002 Feb;5(1):117-2511839234
Cites: Gerontologist. 2003 Apr;43(2):259-7112677083
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2003 Jul-Aug;4(4):231-4312837146
PubMed ID
17327890 View in PubMed
Less detail

Burnout and its causes in Finnish dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228607
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Aug;18(4):208-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
H. Murtomaa
E. Haavio-Mannila
I. Kandolin
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Aug;18(4):208-12
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - etiology
Dental Care
Dental Staff
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Human Engineering
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
In the spring of 1986 burnout and its relation to social and physical environments and the nature of work were studied using a questionnaire sent to a sample of 232 dentists aged under 62 living in the province of Uusimaa, Finland. Most male and female dentists (71 and 67%, respectively) were working in group practices and most (88%) employed an assistant. Professional problems were generally (71%) solved by consulting colleagues. Half of those responding were very satisfied with their relationship to other dental staff. All but 9% of dentists experienced problems in their physical working environments and 22% felt that their uncomfortable working posture interfered significantly with job satisfaction. Women reported chronic work-related conditions diagnosed by a physician more often than men (21 vs. 10%, respectively). At the time of the study, most dentists were experiencing pain in connection with work on patients and 41% of women and 59% of men were experiencing occupational stress. Most dentists experienced at least temporary psychological fatigue as a result of their work and almost half were exhausted at the end of each day. Despite this, most enjoyed working with patients and were enthusiastic about their work. Three aspects of burnout emerged on factor analysis: psychological fatigue, loss of enjoyment of work, and hardening. One third of dentists experienced some hardening and ceased to care greatly what happened to some of their patients. Of the factors associated with working environments, only dissatisfaction with relationships with patients, problems relating to the physical environment and poor working posture significantly increased burnout.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2387138 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian anaesthesia physician resource planning--is it possible?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215420
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1995 Apr;42(4):348-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
N. Donen
I W White
L. Snidal
C A Sanmartin
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1995 Apr;42(4):348-57
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anesthesiology - education - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Certification
Education, Medical, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Female
General Surgery
Health Planning - statistics & numerical data
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Systems
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians, Women - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Societies, Medical
Abstract
This study was undertaken with the objective of assessing current sources of information for anaesthesia Physician Resource Planning (PRP). Four major data bases, the annual reports of Health and Welfare Canada (H&W), the education statistics from the Canadian Post-M.D. Education Registry (CAPER), the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and the Physician Resource Data System of the Canadian Medical Association (PRDS), were examined for the period 1982 to 1991. The ratio of the number of surgical (S) to anaesthesia (A) clinicians decreased over this period despite an increase in the S:A ratios for trainees and certificants. The number of female anaesthetists has progressively increased. A steady decline in the number of rural anaesthetists has occurred. Age distribution of active certified anaesthetists revealed marked inter-regional differences. Little change was noted in the total mean hours worked per week. Each database provided valuable, but limited, data. The PRDS data is useful in assessing trends (age, sex and practice activity). Information provided by H&W tends to underestimate anaesthesia resource information by at least 10%. While information obtained from RCPSC and CAPER is accurate, the current mode of presentation of data limits their usefulness. Integrating data from all the databases appears to provide a meaningful assessment for PRP rather than assessing each database in isolation. Interpretation of the information and its value must take into account the limitations of the data being provided. Assessing present and planning future needs based on the current information structure will prove extremely difficult.
PubMed ID
7788834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian family physicians and complementary/alternative medicine: the role of practice setting, medical training, and province of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147935
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2009 May;46(2):143-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Kristine A Hirschkorn
Robert Andersen
Ivy L Bourgeault
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2009 May;46(2):143-59
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Complementary Therapies - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - education - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Language
Logistic Models
Physicians, Family
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study sheds some light on how and why Canadian family physicians offer complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) services to their patients. Our results suggest that organizational settings discourage physicians from offering CAM, while solo clinics are most conducive. Physicians trained in French-language medical schools are less likely than their English-language trained colleagues to offer CAM services, and those in British Columbia are the most likely to do so. Provincial differences do not appear to be related to the presence or absence of "negative proof" legislation that is considered to facilitate CAM provision by physicians.
PubMed ID
19831238 View in PubMed
Less detail

Careers in health care management, Part 1: Attainment, expectations and aspirations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215830
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1994;7(2):38-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
L. Lemieux-Charles
M. Murray
C. Aird
J. Barnsley
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Administration, University of Toronto.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1994;7(2):38-45
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Mobility
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
Family
Female
Hospital Administrators - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Women, Working - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors conducted a questionnaire survey of health care managers in Canada to learn more about their careers, work experiences and attitudes; and to determine whether their careers differed by such factors as sector of employment, gender, years of experience, education and family status. Major findings include: in teaching and community hospitals, men are more likely to fill chief executive officer (CEO) positions and women tend to be in middle management positions. More men than women in CEO positions reported incomes in the top range ($105,000). Men in CEO and senior management positions are more likely to be married and have children under 16 years of age living at home. Slightly more women than men were clinicians before becoming managers. Most respondents aspired to CEO or senior management positions. Implications for human resources practices are discussed.
PubMed ID
10134901 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical practice for children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146249
Source
Ear Hear. 2010 Jun;31(3):392-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Elizabeth M Fitzpatrick
Andrée Durieux-Smith
Joanne Whittingham
Author Affiliation
Audiology/Speech-Language Pathology Program, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5, Ontario. elizabeth.fitzpatrick@uottawa.ca
Source
Ear Hear. 2010 Jun;31(3):392-400
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Hearing Aids - statistics & numerical data
Hearing Loss, Bilateral - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Hearing Loss, Unilateral - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Hearing Tests - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Neonatal Screening
Prevalence
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Historically, children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss have been reported to experience difficulties related to language and academic functioning. In the context of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening, there is an increasing focus on determining optimal clinical interventions for this population of children. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of mild bilateral or unilateral hearing loss identified in a clinical population from 1990 to 2006 and to document clinical practices related to recommendations and uptake of amplification.
This population-based study consisted of a detailed retrospective chart review of all children identified with mild bilateral or unilateral hearing loss in a Canadian pediatric center between 1990 and 2006. Hearing loss and patient characteristics were extracted to describe the clinical population. Amplification recommendations and uptake of amplification were documented. Clinical decisions regarding amplification practices were explored as a function of age of identification and severity of hearing loss.
A total of 670 children were identified with permanent hearing loss during the 16-yr study period, of which 291 were presented with a mild bilateral or unilateral hearing loss. Detailed reviews of the 255 available medical charts showed that at diagnosis, 178 children presented with mild bilateral, 31 with mild bilateral high frequency, and 46 with unilateral hearing loss. Eighty percent of children had been referred through conventional medical processes before the implementation of universal hearing screening and 20% had been exposed to screening. The average age of identification for the entire group was 54.2 mos (interquartile range, 30.1 to 76.9 mos). Amplification was prescribed for 91.4% of children but there was considerable delay from confirmation of hearing loss to amplification for both children identified with and without screening. Overall, 54.1% received an initial recommendation for amplification and a further 37.3% received a recommendation more than 3 mos after hearing loss confirmation. Practice patterns varied according to category of hearing loss with 60.1% of children with mild bilateral hearing loss receiving an initial recommendation compared with 26.1% of those with unilateral hearing loss. Clinical decision making relative to amplification needs was also changed during the course of audiologic care. The decision to amplify was significantly related to age at identification and degree of hearing loss in the mild bilateral group but not in the unilateral group. Although, more than 90% of children received a recommendation for amplification, chart documentation revealed that less than two thirds of children consistently used their amplification devices. Use of amplification did not vary among children with mild bilateral, mild bilateral high frequency, and unilateral hearing loss.
: This research suggests that there is considerable uncertainty related to clinical recommendations of intervention for this population of children. The impact of parental indecision regarding the benefits of amplification is unknown. Further studies are required to document the potential benefits and factors affecting amplification recommendations and use in the current practice environment where children with mild bilateral or unilateral hearing loss are identified early through newborn hearing screening.
PubMed ID
20054278 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of activity level and service intensity of male and female physicians in five fields of medicine in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214092
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Oct 15;153(8):1097-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1995
Author
C A Woodward
J. Hurley
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Oct 15;153(8):1097-106
Date
Oct-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Dermatology
Family Practice
Female
Health Manpower
Humans
Internal Medicine
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pediatrics
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Women - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Specialization
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine the extent to which physician's sex explains variation in the activity level and service intensity of a cohort of physicians in each of five medical fields after other sources of variation are taken into account.
Data from the Ontario Ministry of Health (MOH) and the CMA were analysed by means of multivariate regression techniques for panel data.
Ontario.
A total of 137 dermatologists, 974 general internists, 330 pediatricians and 941 psychiatrists and a random sample of 2771 family physicians and general practitioners who met the eligibility criteria. Physicians were eligible if they billed the MOH for at least three quarters in 1983, did not bill as a medical laboratory director, provided direct patient care, did not have an alternative funding arrangement with the MOH, remained in the same specialty throughout the study period (1983-90) and billed from an Ontario address.
Three measures of total activity level (annual number of services provided, annual fee-for-service billings and annual mean number of patients seen per quarter) and one measure of service intensity (annual mean number of services per patient per quarter).
Although several variables (e.g., full-time work status, age, type of practice and recent practice move) influenced the four measures examined, physician's sex contributed significantly to explaining variation in activity in 70% of the regression equations. The women provided 33.0% fewere services per year than the men in family and general practice (p
Notes
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1980 Sep;11(3):427-337411068
Cites: J Hum Resour. 1982 Spring;17(2):261-757130708
Cites: J Am Med Womens Assoc. 1993 Sep-Oct;48(5):141-410678203
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Feb;40:249-568130673
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Oct 1;149(7):977-848402426
Cites: Med Care. 1993 Mar;31(3):219-298450680
Cites: Med Care. 1991 Nov;29(11):1083-931943269
Cites: Acad Med. 1991 Aug;66(8):483-51883436
Cites: J Am Med Womens Assoc. 1991 Mar-Apr;46(2):49-542033207
Cites: J R Coll Gen Pract. 1983 Oct;33(255):654-86644671
Cites: J Med Educ. 1984 Nov;59(11 Pt 1):849-556492101
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1985 May 15;132(10):1175-9, 1182-83995440
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1986 Sep-Oct;101(5):513-213094083
Cites: J Health Econ. 1986 Dec;5(4):335-4610282333
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1987 Winter;6(4):104-93428847
Cites: J R Coll Gen Pract. 1987 Dec;37(305):540-33503939
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Jan 15;140(2):212-212910406
Cites: Inquiry. 1989 Spring;26(1):100-152523340
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1990 Mar;80(3):300-42305909
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1990 Jan-Feb;81(1):16-202311044
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Aug 1;143(3):194-2012379127
Cites: Med Care. 1990 Nov;28(11):995-10042250495
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Feb 1;154(3):3038564899
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Feb 15;154(4):446; author reply 446, 4488630832
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Feb 15;154(4):446; author reply 446, 4488630831
PubMed ID
7553517 View in PubMed
Less detail

Demographic characteristics of full-time emergency physicians in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220805
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 1993 Jul;11(4):364-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
S. Lloyd
D. Streiner
S. Shannon
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 1993 Jul;11(4):364-70
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Certification
Emergency Medicine - economics - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe individual and practice characteristics of Canadian emergency physicians, and to determine if these characteristics varied with geographic region, type of certification, or method of reimbursement. The study took place in emergency departments across Canada, and all full-time physicians with certification in emergency medicine, and a random sample of Canadian Association of Emergency Physician members without certification were surveyed with a 23-item questionnaire. Descriptive statistics on individual and practice characteristics were outcome measures. Comparative statistics evaluating demographic characteristics by region, type of certification, and method of reimbursement were used. There were significant differences between responders and nonresponders based on certification (P
PubMed ID
8216518 View in PubMed
Less detail

68 records – page 1 of 7.