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Beliefs and reality: detection and prevention of high alcohol consumption in Swedish antenatal clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9412
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):796-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Mona Göransson
Elisabeth Faxelid
Markus Heilig
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, NEUROTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. mona.goransson@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):796-800
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
Culture
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Midwifery
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - standards - trends
Professional Practice - standards - trends
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Substance Abuse Detection - standards - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Public antenatal care (ANC) clinics in Sweden contribute to low prenatal mortality and morbidity, through early detection of somatic risk factors, and referral to appropriate specialized care. Available statistics indicate, however, that this system is ineffective in dealing with psychosocial health problems, such as hazardous drug and alcohol use. Factors underlying this failure have not been explored. METHODS: An anonymous survey was carried out among all 207 ANC midwives in Stockholm County to establish their level of training within this problem area, clinical experience, theoretical clinical strategies, and actual clinical actions. FINDINGS: Responses indicate that ANC midwives: 1. are well aware of the health hazards of drug and alcohol use during pregnancy; 2. confirm having met and cared for subjects with hazardous substance use; 3. are familiar with specialized care resources available for this patient category; 4. make adequate choices regarding clinical action, i.e. problem identification and referral to specialized care, in hypothetical situations of encountering this patient category; 5. report consistent failure to actually exercise these choices in real clinical situations. CONCLUSIONS: A structured, clinically acceptable methodology needs to be developed in order for ANC clinics to fulfill their mission in the area of hazardous substance use in pregnant women.
PubMed ID
15315589 View in PubMed
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