Skip header and navigation

Refine By

564 records – page 1 of 57.

Absolute fracture risk reporting in clinical practice: a physician-centered survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159036
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
W D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg R2H 2A6 Manitoba, Canada. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density - physiology
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fractures, Bone - economics - prevention & control - radiography
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Osteoporosis - economics - physiopathology - radiotherapy
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice
Risk Assessment - economics - standards
Specialization - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Non-expert clinical practitioners who had received bone density reports based on 10-year absolute fracture risk were surveyed to determine their response to this new system. Absolute fracture risk reporting was well received and was strongly preferred to traditional T-score-based reporting. Non-specialist physicians were particularly supportive of risk-based bone mineral density (BMD) reporting.
Absolute risk estimation is preferable to risk categorization based upon BMD alone. The objective of this study was to specifically assess the response of non-expert clinical practitioners to this approach.
In January 2006, the Province of Manitoba, Canada, started reporting 10-year osteoporotic fracture risks for patients aged 50 years and older based on the hip T-score, gender, age, and multiple clinical risk factors. In May 2006 and October 2006, a brief anonymous survey was sent to all physicians who had requested a BMD test during 2005 and 206 responses were received.
When asked whether the report contained the information needed to manage patients, the mean score for the absolute fracture risk report was higher than for the T-score-based report (p
PubMed ID
18239957 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to syringes for HIV prevention for injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia: syringe purchase test study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115926
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:183
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ekaterina V Fedorova
Roman V Skochilov
Robert Heimer
Patricia Case
Leo Beletsky
Lauretta E Grau
Andrey P Kozlov
Alla V Shaboltas
Author Affiliation
The Biomedical Center, 8, Viborgskaya Street, St. Petersburg 194044, Russia. ekaterina_fedorova@yahoo.com
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:183
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Commerce - methods
Female
HIV Infections - etiology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Pharmacies - classification - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Syringes - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
The HIV epidemic in Russia is concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). This is especially true for St. Petersburg where high HIV incidence persists among the city's estimated 80,000 IDUs. Although sterile syringes are legally available, access for IDUs may be hampered. To explore the feasibility of using pharmacies to expand syringe access and provide other prevention services to IDUs, we investigated the current access to sterile syringes at the pharmacies and the correlation between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence in St. Petersburg.
965 pharmacies citywide were mapped, classified by ownership type, and the association between pharmacy density and HIV prevalence at the district level was tested. We selected two districts among the 18 districts--one central and one peripheral--that represented two major types of city districts and contacted all operating pharmacies by phone to inquire if they stocked syringes and obtained details about their stock. Qualitative interviews with 26 IDUs provided data regarding syringe access in pharmacies and were used to formulate hypotheses for the pharmacy syringe purchase test wherein research staff attempted to purchase syringes in all pharmacies in the two districts.
No correlation was found between the density of pharmacies and HIV prevalence at the district level. Of 108 operating pharmacies, 38 (35%) did not sell syringes of the types used by IDUs; of these, half stocked but refused to sell syringes to research staff, and the other half did not stock syringes at all. Overall 70 (65%) of the pharmacies did sell syringes; of these, 49 pharmacies sold single syringes without any restrictions and 21 offered packages of ten.
Trainings for pharmacists need to be conducted to reduce negative attitudes towards IDUs and increase pharmacists' willingness to sell syringes. At a structural level, access to safe injection supplies for IDUs could be increased by including syringes in the federal list of mandatory medical products sold by pharmacies.
Notes
Cites: J Urban Health. 2013 Apr;90(2):276-8322718357
Cites: J Urban Health. 2010 Dec;87(6):942-5321116724
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1998;18 Suppl 1:S60-709663626
Cites: J Infect. 1996 Jan;32(1):53-628852552
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Aug 3;313(7052):272-48704541
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1995 Sep 1;10(1):82-97648290
Cites: J Urban Health. 2004 Dec;81(4):661-7015466847
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2003 Nov 21;3:3714633286
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 2003 Oct;14(10):697-70314596774
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1998;18 Suppl 1:S94-1019663631
Cites: AIDS. 2006 Apr 4;20(6):901-616549975
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006 Apr 15;41(5):657-6316652041
Cites: AIDS Behav. 2006 Nov;10(6):717-2116642418
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 Jan;97(1):117-2417138929
Cites: Health Hum Rights. 2012;14(2):34-4823568946
Cites: AIDS Behav. 2010 Aug;14(4):932-4118843531
Cites: J Urban Health. 2010 Jul;87(4):543-5220549568
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Jun 1;109(1-3):79-8320060238
Cites: J Urban Health. 2009 Nov;86(6):918-2819921542
Cites: J Urban Health. 2009 Jul;86 Suppl 1:131-4319507037
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Nov 15;372(9651):1733-4518817968
Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-3618313910
PubMed ID
23452390 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of dental hygienists in diagnosing dental decay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34761
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):182-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
K. Ohrn
C G Crossner
I. Börgesson
A. Taube
Author Affiliation
College of Health and Caring Professions, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):182-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Dental Caries - diagnosis - pathology - radiography
Dental Hygienists
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentists
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Observer Variation
Professional Practice - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health Dentistry
Sweden
Tooth - pathology - radiography
Abstract
During recent decades, the duties and care rendered by Swedish dental hygienists have continuously expanded, and since 1991 they are licensed to practice dental hygiene independently. The aim of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of dental hygienists in examining and recording dental caries in comparison with dentists performing identical examinations. The study included two parts: A) Registration of carious lesions from radiographs of 100 extracted teeth, where the correct diagnosis could be verified, and B) clinical examination and registration of carious lesions in 213 patients. No statistically significant differences could be found between the dental hygienists' and their control dentists' accuracy to diagnose and record dental decay, with the exception of the number of initial lesions (white spot lesions) registered clinically, where the dental hygienists recorded more buccal and lingual lesions. Irrespective of the group of examiners (dental hygienists or dentists), however, the inter-examiner variation was wide. The variation decreased with the size of the lesion and increased with the age of the patient. This study suggests that no patient with a restorative treatment need would have been neglected if the dental hygienists had performed the examination, and, possibly, a more accurate non-restorative treatment need would have been addressed.
PubMed ID
8871016 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acute care nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154071
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(4):100-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Christina Hurlock-Chorostecki
Mary van Soeren
Sharon Goodwin
Author Affiliation
Parkwood Hospital of St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada. tina.hurlock-chorostecki@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(4):100-16
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - nursing
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nurse Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Nurse's Role
Nursing Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Professional Autonomy
Professional Practice Location
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
In spite of the long history of nurse practitioner practice in primary healthcare, less is known about nurse practitioners in hospital-based environments because until very recently, they have not been included in the extended class registration (nurse practitioner equivalent) with the College of Nurses of Ontario. Recent changes in the regulation of nurse practitioners in Ontario to include adult, paediatric and anaesthesia, indicates that a workforce review of practice profiles is needed to fully understand the depth and breadth of the role within hospital settings. Here, we present information obtained through a descriptive, self-reported survey of all nurse practitioners working in acute care settings who are not currently regulated in the extended class in Ontario. Results suggest wide acceptance of the role is concentrated around academic teaching hospitals. Continued barriers exist related to legislation and regulation as well as understanding and support for the multiple aspects of this role beyond clinical practice. This information may be used by nurse practitioners, nursing leaders and other administrators to position the role in hospital settings for greater impact on patient care. As well, understanding the need for regulatory and legislative changes to support the hospital-based Nurse Practitioner role will enable greater impact on health human resources and healthcare transformation.
PubMed ID
19029848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute rheumatic fever and poststreptococcal reactive arthritis: diagnostic and treatment practices of pediatric subspecialists in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193938
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Jul;28(7):1681-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
N. Birdi
M. Hosking
M K Clulow
C M Duffy
U. Allen
R E Petty
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Jul;28(7):1681-8
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Reactive - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Canada
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Pediatrics
Professional Practice
Questionnaires
Rheumatic Fever - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Abstract
We conducted a survey of pediatric specialists in rheumatology, cardiology, and infectious diseases to ascertain present Canadian clinical practice with respect to diagnosis and treatment of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and poststreptococcal reactive arthritis (PSReA), and to determine what variables influence the decision for or against prophylaxis in these cases.
A questionnaire comprising 6 clinical case scenarios of acute arthritis occurring after recent streptococcal pharyngitis was sent to members of the Canadian Pediatric Rheumatology Association, and to heads of divisions of pediatric cardiology and pediatric infectious diseases at the 16 university affiliated centers across Canada.
There is considerable variability with respect to diagnosis in cases of ReA following group A streptococcal (GAS) infection both within and across specialties. There is extensive variability regarding the decision to provide prophylaxis in cases designated as ARF or PSReA. Findings indicated that physicians are most comfortable prescribing antibiotic prophylaxis in the presence of clear cardiac risk and are less inclined to such intervention for patients diagnosed with PSReA. When prophylaxis was recommended for cases of PSReA, the majority of respondents prescribed longer term courses of antibiotics.
The lack of observed consistency in diagnosis and treatment in cases of reactive arthritis post-GAS infection likely reflects the lack of universally accepted criteria for diagnosis of PSReA and insufficient longterm data regarding carditis risk within this population. There is a need for clear definitions and treatment guidelines to allow greater consistency in clinical practice across pediatric specialties.
PubMed ID
11469479 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapted Physical Activity Professionals in Rehabilitation: An Explorative Study in the Norwegian Context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298444
Source
Adapt Phys Activ Q. 2018 Oct 01; 35(4):458-475
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2018
Author
Øyvind F Standal
Tor Erik H Nyquist
Hanne H Mong
Author Affiliation
1 OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University.
Source
Adapt Phys Activ Q. 2018 Oct 01; 35(4):458-475
Date
Oct-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Exercise
Humans
Norway
Professional Practice
Professional Role
Rehabilitation
Abstract
Adapted physical activity (APA) is characterized by a strong orientation to professional practice. Currently, there exists limited empirical research about the professional status of APA in the context of rehabilitation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe and understand the professional status, role, and work tasks of APA specialists in Norway. For the purpose of the study, the authors conducted group interviews with APA specialists and individual interviews with unit leaders at six rehabilitation institutions in the national specialist health care services. The results highlight the content of the work tasks, the roles in the cross-professional teams, the status in the institutions, and what the participants perceive to be the knowledge base for their profession. Although these results may be specific to the Norwegian context, the authors also discuss possible implications of their findings for APA in an international perspective.
PubMed ID
30366504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to guidelines on antibiotic treatment for respiratory tract infections in various categories of physicians: a retrospective cross-sectional study of data from electronic patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271494
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
David Tell
Sven Engström
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To study how prescription patterns concerning respiratory tract infections differ between interns, residents, younger general practitioners (GPs), older GPs and locums.
Retrospective study of structured data from electronic patient records.
Data were obtained from 53 health centres and 3 out-of-hours units in Jönköping County, Sweden, through their common electronic medical record database.
All physicians working in primary care during the 2-year study period (1 November 2010 to 31 October 2012).
Physicians' adherence to current guidelines for respiratory tract infections regarding the use of antibiotics.
We found considerable differences in prescribing patterns between physician categories. The recommended antibiotic, phenoxymethylpenicillin, was more often prescribed by interns, residents and younger GPs, while older GPs and locums to a higher degree prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. The greatest differences were seen when the recommendation in guidelines was to refrain from antibiotics, as for acute bronchitis. Interns and residents most often followed guidelines, while compliance in descending order was: young GPs, older GPs and locums. We also noticed that male doctors were somewhat overall more restrictive with antibiotics than female doctors.
In general, primary care doctors followed national guidelines on choice of antibiotics when treating respiratory tract infections in children but to a lesser degree when treating adults. Refraining from antibiotics seems harder. Adherence to national guidelines could be improved, especially for acute bronchitis and pneumonia. This was especially true for older GPs and locums whose prescription patterns were distant from the prevailing guidelines.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;8(3):278-8211927025
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(5):366-7112069022
Cites: South Med J. 2001 Apr;94(4):365-911332898
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Jun;47:1217-2411421050
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2012 Apr;18(2):473-8421210896
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2011 Dec;66 Suppl 6:vi3-1222096064
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(4):208-1519929185
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;14(11):1722-3018976555
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2008 Feb;8(2):125-3218222163
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2008 Jan;77(1):50-717185030
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Sep;56(530):680-516954000
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1982 Jul;15(1):111-77086372
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(2):139-4315061670
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2004 Jan;9(1):30-414762318
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2013 Apr 3-16;110(27-28):1282-423951882
PubMed ID
26179648 View in PubMed
Less detail

The adoption of high involvement work practices in Canadian nursing homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165874
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2007;20(1):16-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kent V Rondeau
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. kent.rondeau@ualberta.ca
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2007;20(1):16-26
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Professional Practice
Abstract
The objective of the research is to assess the degree of adoption of high-involvement nursing work practices in long-term care organizations. It seeks to determine the organizational and workplace factors that are associated with the uptake/adoption of ten selected human resource high-involvement employee work practices.
A survey questionnaire was sent to 300 long-term care organizations (nursing homes) in western Canada. Results from 125 nursing home establishments (43 percent response rate) are reported herein.
Of the ten high-involvement nursing work practices examined, employee suggestion and recognition systems are the most widely adopted by homes in the sample, while shared governance and incentive/merit-base pay are used by a small minority of establishments.
The uptake of high-involvement nursing work practices is not adopted in a haphazard fashion. Their uptake is variously associated with a number of establishment and workplace factors, including the presence of a supportive and enabling workplace culture.
The objective of this research is to examine the extent and degree of adoption of high involvement work practices in a sample of long-term care establishments operating in the four provinces of western Canada.
PubMed ID
20690472 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advocate or abdicate: the responsible choice for today's emergency medicine resident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152110
Source
CJEM. 2009 Mar;11(2):123
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Alan Drummond
Source
CJEM. 2009 Mar;11(2):123
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Emergency Medicine - manpower
Humans
Internship and Residency
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Notes
Comment On: CJEM. 2009 Jan;11(1):99-10019166648
PubMed ID
19280721 View in PubMed
Less detail

564 records – page 1 of 57.