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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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[8 out of 10 midwives informed about folic acid. Most of them considered their knowledge about folic acid not sufficient]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30331
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-2004
Author
Anette Lundqvist
Anna Lena Wennberg
Gunvor Lövgren
Herbert Sandström
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå universitet. anette.lundqvist@nurs.umu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Date
Apr-7-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Nursing, Continuing
English Abstract
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - complications - prevention & control
Guidelines
Health education
Humans
Maternal health services
Maternal Welfare
Neural Tube Defects - etiology - prevention & control
Nurse Midwives - education
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Deficiency of folic acid increases the risk for neural tube defects among newborn children and megaloblastic anaemia in the mother. The aim of this study was to make a survey of how midwives working in maternity health care, family planning guidance, and specialist prenatal care in a Swedish county inform women of childbearing age about folic acid. The questionnaire study showed that 79% of the midwives informed the women about folic acid. Usually, the women received information first when they asked for it and midwifes were less prone to inform young women about folic acid. 87% of the midwives felt that they did not know enough about folic acid. CONCLUSIONS: Midwives play an important role in information about the need of folic acid intake for women in childbearing age. Changes in local routines, guidelines and further education of midwifes would subsequently provide information about the importance of folic acid to women in childbearing age.
PubMed ID
15146665 View in PubMed
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18F-FDG PET imaging of myocardial viability in an experienced center with access to 18F-FDG and integration with clinical management teams: the Ottawa-FIVE substudy of the PARR 2 trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144812
Source
J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Arun Abraham
Graham Nichol
Kathryn A Williams
Ann Guo
Robert A deKemp
Linda Garrard
Ross A Davies
Lloyd Duchesne
Haissam Haddad
Benjamin Chow
Jean DaSilva
Rob S B Beanlands
Author Affiliation
National Cardiac PET Centre and Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-74
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Heart - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Heart Failure - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization
Patient care team
Positron-Emission Tomography
Professional Competence
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Survival Analysis
Tissue Survival
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Abstract
(18)F-FDG PET may assist decision making in ischemic cardiomyopathy. The PET and Recovery Following Revascularization (PARR 2) trial demonstrated a trend toward beneficial outcomes with PET-assisted management. The substudy of PARR 2 that we call Ottawa-FIVE, described here, was a post hoc analysis to determine the benefit of PET in a center with experience, ready access to (18)F-FDG, and integration with clinical teams.
Included were patients with left ventricular dysfunction and suspected coronary artery disease being considered for revascularization. The patients had been randomized in PARR 2 to PET-assisted management (group 1) or standard care (group 2) and had been enrolled in Ottawa after August 1, 2002 (the date that on-site (18)F-FDG was initiated) (n = 111). The primary outcome was the composite endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or cardiac rehospitalization within 1 y. Data were compared with the rest of PARR 2 (PET-assisted management [group 3] or standard care [group 4]).
In the Ottawa-FIVE subgroup of PARR 2, the cumulative proportion of patients experiencing the composite event was 19% (group 1), versus 41% (group 2). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression showed a benefit for the PET-assisted strategy (hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.72; P = 0.005). Compared with other patients in PARR 2, Ottawa-FIVE patients had a lower ejection fraction (25% +/- 7% vs. 27% +/- 8%, P = 0.04), were more often female (24% vs. 13%, P = 0.006), tended to be older (64 +/- 10 y vs. 62 +/- 10 y, P = 0.07), and had less previous coronary artery bypass grafting (13% vs. 21%, P = 0.07). For patients in the rest of PARR 2, there was no significant difference in events between groups 3 and 4. The observed effect of (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management in the 4 groups in the context of adjusted survival curves demonstrated a significant interaction (P = 0.016). Comparisons of the 2 arms in Ottawa-FIVE to the 2 arms in the rest of PARR 2 demonstrated a trend toward significance (standard care, P = 0.145; PET-assisted management, P = 0.057).
In this post hoc group analysis, a significant reduction in cardiac events was observed in patients with (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management, compared with patients who received standard care. The results suggest that outcome may be benefited using (18)F-FDG PET in an experienced center with ready access to (18)F-FDG and integration with imaging, heart failure, and revascularization teams.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):505-620237024
PubMed ID
20237039 View in PubMed
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Ability to solve problems, professionalism, management, empathy, and working capacity in occupational therapy--the professional self description form.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73247
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M T Gullberg
H M Olsson
G. Alenfelt
A B Ivarsson
M. Nilsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Empathy
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Problem Solving
Professional Competence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Abstract
The majority of occupational therapists in Sweden previously worked on large occupational therapy wards. Health care policy has changed over the years and the system has been reorganized accordingly. The employment situation for occupational therapists has also changed. This paper focuses on the perception of professional self among occupational therapists. The objective was to explore the professional self and to suggest components important to the occupational therapist profession. The Professional Self Description Form (PSDF) was used for the exploration of self. The 19 items in the PSDF cover areas relevant to professional functioning and activity. Sixty-eight employed occupational therapists participated. The results of the PSDF were subjected to factor analysis and five factors were obtained; Ability to solve problems, Professionalism, Management, Empathy, and Working capacity. We believe that these five factors can function as improving domains of the role of the professional occupational therapist in Sweden.
PubMed ID
7724926 View in PubMed
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Accuracy among dentists experienced in forensic odontology in establishing identity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219799
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1993 Dec;11(2):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
G. Ekstrom
T. Johnsson
H. Borrman
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Odontology, University of Goteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1993 Dec;11(2):45-52
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentists
Expert Testimony
Forensic Dentistry - standards
Humans
Observer Variation
Professional Competence
Radiography, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 17 forensic odontologists identifying individuals from two sets of radiographs, one regarded as ante- and the other as postmortem. Each case was observed twice and only one pair out of 31 did not match. The observers were asked to comment about each case, classifying it as easy, moderate or difficult. The results show that one observer was totally correct in the first analysis while four observers made no errors the second time. In the first evaluation 14 observers made between one and seven errors and two observers made 11 errors each. In the second evaluation 12 observers made between one and seven errors and one observer made 13 errors. At the first evaluation, the observers judged 18 of the cases as easy, eight as medium and five as difficult. At the second evaluation, the observers pronounced 13 of the cases as easy, 13 as medium and five as difficult. The corresponding values for the authors were 6, 12 and 13. Most of the mistakes were made on the cases with no restorations and the incorrect answers were found mostly among the difficult cases. In practical forensic work however additional dental chart information is usually available to the forensic odontologist.
PubMed ID
8040212 View in PubMed
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"A challenge" - healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277305
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Hanna Grundström
Preben Kjølhede
Carina Berterö
Siw Alehagen
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Dysmenorrhea - diagnosis - etiology
Dyspareunia - diagnosis - etiology
Endometriosis - complications - diagnosis
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Male
Menstruation
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives
Ovulation
Pelvic Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Physicians
Professional Competence
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify and describe the experiences of healthcare professionals when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 gynecologists, six general practitioners and nine midwives working at one university hospital, one central hospital, one private gynecology clinic and five healthcare centers in south-east Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative conventional content analysis.
Three clusters were identified: the corroborating encounter, the normal variation of menstruation cycles, and the suspicion of endometriosis. The healthcare professionals tried to make a corroborating encounter by acknowledging the woman, taking time to listen, and giving an explanation for the problems. Healthcare professionals had different ways to determine what was normal as regards menstrual pain, ovulation pain and dyspareunia. They also needed to have the competence to act and react when the symptoms indicated endometriosis.
Meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis is challenging and demands a certain level of competence from healthcare professionals. Sometimes the symptoms are camouflaged as "normal" menstruation pain, making it hard to satisfy the needs of this patient group.
PubMed ID
26826048 View in PubMed
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[A controlled study of the short-term and long-term effects of a "train the trainers" course--secondary publication].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154394
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 27;170(44):3553-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2008
Author
Sune Rubak
Lene Mortensen
Charlotte Ringsted
Bente Malling
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Skejby, Paediatrisk Afdeling, Viborg Hospital, Medicinsk Afdeling, og Aarhus Universitet, Center for Medicinsk Uddannelse. sr@alm.au.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Oct 27;170(44):3553-6
Date
Oct-27-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Feedback
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Learning
Orthopedics - education
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Teaching - methods
Abstract
This is an intervention-study discussing the long-term effects of a 3-day "Train the trainers course" (TTC). In the intervention (I) group 98.4% of doctors participated in a TTC, both specialists and trainees. Knowledge about teaching skills increased in the I group by 25% after the TTC; a result which was sustained at six months. Teaching behaviour was significantly changed as the use of feedback and supervision had increased from a score of 4 to 6 (max. score = 9).
A 3-day residential TTC has a significant impact on knowledge gain concerning teaching skills, teaching behaviour and clinical learning culture after six months.
PubMed ID
18985941 View in PubMed
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Acquiring and refining CBT skills and competencies: which training methods are perceived to be most effective?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148955
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
James Bennett-Levy
Freda McManus
Bengt E Westling
Melanie Fennell
Author Affiliation
University of Sydney and Southern Cross University, Australia. james.bennettlevy@ncahs. health.nsw.gov.au
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognitive Therapy - education
Curriculum
Education
Female
Humans
Male
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
A theoretical and empirical base for CBT training and supervision has started to emerge. Increasingly sophisticated maps of CBT therapist competencies have recently been developed, and there is evidence that CBT training and supervision can produce enhancement of CBT skills. However, the evidence base suggesting which specific training techniques are most effective for the development of CBT competencies is lacking.
This paper addresses the question: What training or supervision methods are perceived by experienced therapists to be most effective for training CBT competencies?
120 experienced CBT therapists rated which training or supervision methods in their experience had been most effective in enhancing different types of therapy-relevant knowledge or skills.
In line with the main prediction, it was found that different training methods were perceived to be differentially effective. For instance, reading, lectures/talks and modelling were perceived to be most useful for the acquisition of declarative knowledge, while enactive learning strategies (role-play, self-experiential work), together with modelling and reflective practice, were perceived to be most effective in enhancing procedural skills. Self-experiential work and reflective practice were seen as particularly helpful in improving reflective capability and interpersonal skills.
The study provides a framework for thinking about the acquisition and refinement of therapist skills that may help trainers, supervisors and clinicians target their learning objectives with the most effective training strategies.
PubMed ID
19703329 View in PubMed
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Active interprofessional education in a patient based setting increases perceived collaborative and professional competence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154632
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Karin Hallin
Anna Kiessling
Annika Waldner
Peter Henriksson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):151-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Professional Competence - standards
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Interprofessional competence can be defined as knowledge and understanding of their own and the other team members' professional roles, comprehension of communication and teamwork and collaboration in taking care of patients.
To evaluate whether students perceived that they had achieved interprofessional competence after participating in clinical teamwork training.
Six hundred and sixteen students from four undergraduate educational programs-medicine, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy-participated in an interprofessional course at a clinical education ward. The students filled out pre and post questionnaires (96% response rate).
All student groups increased their perceived interprofessional competence. Occupational therapy and medical students had the greatest achievements. All student groups perceived improved knowledge of the other three professions' work (p = 0.000000) and assessed that the course had contributed to the understanding of the importance of communication and teamwork to patient care (effect size 1.0; p = 0.00002). The medical students had the greatest gain (p = 0.00093). All student groups perceived that the clarity of their own professional role had increased significantly (p = 0.00003). Occupational therapy students had the greatest gain (p = 0.000014).
Active patient based learning by working together in a real ward context seemed to be an effective means to increase collaborative and professional competence.
PubMed ID
18937139 View in PubMed
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734 records – page 1 of 74.