Skip header and navigation

Refine By

25 records – page 1 of 3.

The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care: vascular cognitive impairment screening and assessment practices in an Ontario inpatient stroke rehabilitation facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125960
Source
Top Stroke Rehabil. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):141-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
J Andrew McClure
Katherine Salter
Norine Foley
Hannah Mahon
Robert Teasell
Author Affiliation
Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Top Stroke Rehabil. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):141-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - etiology - rehabilitation
Communication Disorders - etiology - rehabilitation
Dementia, Vascular - complications - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - standards
Middle Aged
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - rehabilitation
Abstract
The Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care suggest that (1) all patients with stroke should be screened for cognitive impairment and (2) persons who are detected as having cognitive impairment on a screening test should receive additional cognitive assessment. The purpose of this study is to determine whether care in an Ontario inpatient stroke rehabilitation facility is consistent with these recommendations.
Stroke patients discharged from an inpatient stroke rehabilitation program located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, from May to October 2009 were included in this study. Charts were reviewed to identify current screening and assessment practices. The percentages of patients formally screened and/or assessed as well as differences between those who were and were not screened are reported.
The study included 123 patients (62 male; mean age = 67.3,SD 15.1). During inpatient rehabilitation, 82.9% of patients were screened using a formal cognitive screening instrument. Patients with cognitive and/or communication deficits were significantly less likely to be screened than those with intact cognitive and communicative abilities. Although 77.5% of those screened scored below the threshold for cognitive impairment, evidence of referral for a comprehensive cognitive assessment was found for only 3 patients.
Although the majority of patients were screened for cognitive impairment while in inpatient rehabilitation, few patients were referred for a comprehensive diagnostic examination. On the basis of these results from a single inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit, it appears that specific cognitive deficits are likely underidentified in stroke rehabilitation patients in Ontario.
PubMed ID
22436362 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Scale (AITCS): development and testing of the instrument.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125845
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(1):58-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Carole A Orchard
Gillian A King
Hossein Khalili
Mary Beth Bezzina
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario. corchard@uwo.ca
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(1):58-67
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient Care Team - statistics & numerical data
Problem-Based Learning - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation - organization & administration
Reproducibility of Results
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
Many health professionals believe they practice collaboratively. Providing insight into their actual level of collaboration requires a means to assess practice within health settings. This chapter reports on the development, testing, and refinement process for the Assessment of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Scale (AITCS). There is a paucity of literature and measurement tools addressing interprofessional collaborative team performance and the nature of effective teamwork processes and patient roles within collaborative teams. These gaps limit our knowledge about how health care teams form and function. Instruments are therefore needed to assess collaborative relationships.
The AITCS, with its 47 items within 4 subscales (partnership, cooperation, coordination, and shared decision making) and assessed on a 5-point Likert scale, was administered to a total of 125 practitioners from 7 health care teams practicing within a variety of settings, in 2 provinces in Canada.
Principal components and factor analysis of data resulted in 37 items loading onto 3 factors, explaining 61.02% of the variance. The internal consistency estimates for reliability of each subscale ranged from 0.80 to 0.97, with an overall reliability of 0.98. Thus, the AITCS is a reliable and valid instrument.
The psychometric analysis of this instrument supports its value in measuring collaboration within teams and when patients are included as team members. The AITCS can be applied to continuing professional education interventions to determine change over time. It has limitations to the Canadian context and within the settings where participants practiced. Further test and retest reliability and longitudinal study application is needed.
PubMed ID
22447712 View in PubMed
Less detail

Best practices in scleroderma: an analysis of practice variability in SSc centres within the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group (CSRG).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122345
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2012 Mar-Apr;30(2 Suppl 71):S38-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sarah Harding
Sarit Khimdas
Ashley Bonner
Murray Baron
Janet Pope
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. sarahharding@rcsi.ie
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2012 Mar-Apr;30(2 Suppl 71):S38-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking - standards
Canada
Consensus
Databases, Factual
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Rheumatology - standards
Scleroderma, Systemic - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There is currently no consensus on best practice in systemic sclerosis (SSc). To determine if variability in treatment and investigations exists, practices among Canadian Sclerodermia Research Group (CSRG) centres were compared.
Prospective clinical and demographic data from adult SSc patients are collected annually from 15 CSRG treatment centres. Laboratory parameters, self-reported socio-demographic questionnaires, current and past medications and disease outcome measures are recorded. For centres with >50 patients enrolled, treatment practices were analysed to determine practice variability.
Data from 640 of 938 patients within the CSRG database met inclusion criteria, where 87.3% were female, the mean ± SEM age was 55.3±0.5, 48.9% had limited SSc and 47.8% had diffuse SSc (and 3.3% uncharacterised). Some investigation and treatment practices were inconsistent among 6 centres including proportion receiving: PDE5 (phosphodiesterase type 5) inhibitors for Raynaud's phenomenon (p=0.036); cyclophosphamide (p=0.037) and azathioprine (p=0.037) for treatment of ILD; and current use of D-penicillamine, although uncommon, varied among sites. Annual echocardiograms and PFTs were frequently done and did not vary among sites but the rate of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was directly related to site size and this was not the case for other organ involvement.
Despite routine tests within a database, site variation in SSc with respect to investigations and management among CSRG centres exists suggesting a need for a standardised approach to the investigation and treatment of SSc. One can speculate that larger centres are more export in detecting PAH.
PubMed ID
22691207 View in PubMed
Less detail

C-HOBIC: standardized clinical outcomes to support evidence-informed nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125574
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25(1):43-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012

Diversity in the pastoral relationship: an evaluation of the helping styles inventory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216053
Source
J Pastoral Care. 1995;49(4):365-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
T S O'Connor
E. Meakes
M. Bourdeau
P. McCarroll-Butler
M. Papp
Author Affiliation
Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pastoral Care. 1995;49(4):365-74
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chaplaincy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Research
Helping Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Psychological
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Pastoral Care - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Abstract
Presents an ethnographic study of practitioners' experiences of the Helping Styles Inventory (HSI). Analyzes the data from twenty-one interviews, noting helpful and limiting aspects of the HSI. Discusses implications of the research for the HSI and for ministry in general.
PubMed ID
10152798 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of the perioperative blood transfusion and blood conservation in cardiac surgery clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists upon clinical practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143411
Source
Anesth Analg. 2010 Aug;111(2):316-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Donald S Likosky
Daniel C FitzGerald
Robert C Groom
Dwayne K Jones
Robert A Baker
Kenneth G Shann
C David Mazer
Bruce D Spiess
Simon C Body
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, The Center for Leadership and Improvement, Dartmouth Medical School, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Dartmouth College, Lebanon, NH, USA.
Source
Anesth Analg. 2010 Aug;111(2):316-23
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - standards
Blood Loss, Surgical - prevention & control
Blood Transfusion - standards
Canada
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Guideline Adherence
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Myocardial Reperfusion - standards
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Perioperative Care
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Postoperative Hemorrhage - prevention & control
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Societies, Medical
Thoracic Surgical Procedures - standards
United States
Abstract
The 2007 Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Clinical Practice Guideline for Perioperative Blood Transfusion and Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery was recently promulgated and has received much attention. Using a survey of cardiac anesthesiologists and perfusionists' clinical practice, we aimed to assess the current practices of perfusion, anesthesia, and surgery, as recommended by the Guidelines, and to also determine the role the Guidelines had in changing these practices.
Nontrainee members of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, the American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion, the Canadian Society of Clinical Perfusion, and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology were surveyed using a standardized survey instrument that examined clinical practices and responses to the Guidelines.
A total of 1402 surveys from 1061 institutions principally in the United States (677 institutions) and Canada (34 institutions) were returned, a 32% response rate. There was wide distribution of the Guidelines with 78% of anesthesiologists and 67% of perfusionists reporting having read all, part, or a summary of the Guidelines. However, only 20% of respondents reported that an institutional discussion had taken place as a result of the Guidelines, and only 14% of respondents reported that an institutional monitoring group had been formed. There was wide variability in current preoperative testing, perfusion, surgical, and pharmacological practices reported by respondents. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported 1 or more practice changes in response to the Guidelines. The changes made were reported to be highly (9%) or somewhat (31%) effective in reducing overall transfusion rates. Only 4 of 38 Guideline recommendations were reported by >5% of respondents to have been changed in response to the Guidelines.
Wide variation in clinical practices of cardiac surgery was reported. Little change in clinical practices was attributed to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Guidelines.
Notes
Comment In: Anesth Analg. 2010 Dec;111(6):1555-921106971
PubMed ID
20488928 View in PubMed
Less detail

Everyday practices at the medical ward: a 16-month ethnographic field study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122971
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:184
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Axel Wolf
Inger Ekman
Lisen Dellenborg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. axel.wolf@gu.se
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:184
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Catchment Area (Health)
Clinical Competence
Confidentiality
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospital Units - manpower
Hospitals, University
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - standards
Patient Care Team - standards
Patient-Centered Care - manpower
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Abstract
Modern hospital care should ostensibly be multi-professional and person-centred, yet it still seems to be driven primarily by a hegemonic, positivistic, biomedical agenda. This study aimed to describe the everyday practices of professionals and patients in a coronary care unit, and analyse how the routines, structures and physical design of the care environment influenced their actions and relationships.
Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted over a 16-month period (between 2009 and 2011) by two researchers working in parallel in a Swedish coronary care unit. Observations, informal talks and formal interviews took place with registered nurses, assistant nurses, physicians and patients in the coronary care unit. The formal interviews were conducted with six registered nurses (five female, one male) including the chief nurse manager, three assistant nurses (all female), two cardiologists and three patients (one female, two male).
We identified the structures that either promoted or counteracted the various actions and relationships of patients and healthcare professionals. The care environment, with its minimalistic design, strong focus on routines and modest capacity for dialogue, restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This resulted in feelings of guilt, predominantly on the part of the registered nurses.
The care environment restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This may result in increased moral stress among those in multi-professional teams who work in the grey area between biomedical and person-centred care.
Notes
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 1999 Sep;6(5):357-7310696183
Cites: J Health Organ Manag. 2010;24(4):412-2721033637
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Apr;38(2):129-4011223054
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1595-60412614708
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Sep;24(3):620-3421050249
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2010 Dec;20(12):1629-4120663934
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):259-6421231787
Cites: J Hosp Med. 2011 Oct;6(8):438-4421990172
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Oct 13;365(15):e3121992473
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2011 Dec;10(4):248-5121764386
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:31922111656
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2012 Mar 15;366(11):1020-722417255
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 May;33(9):1112-921926072
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Sep-Oct;55(2):417-2122417401
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2012 Oct;23(4):342-5022802303
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2003 May;10(3):312-2212762464
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2004 Mar;13(3a):31-815028037
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2004 Jun;18(2):145-5315147477
Cites: Compr Psychiatry. 1969 Jul;10(4):249-585810538
Cites: Science. 1977 Apr 8;196(4286):129-36847460
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1995 Nov;22(5):1006-118568049
Cites: Heart Lung. 1999 May-Jun;28(3):203-910330216
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2005 Apr;50(2):143-5215788078
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2005 Jul;12(4):381-9016045246
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Sep;58(3):296-30416122641
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Dec;19(4):344-5316324058
Cites: Nurs Philos. 2006 Oct;7(4):235-4616965305
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:5117040575
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2006 Dec;56(5):472-917078823
Cites: PLoS Med. 2006 Oct;3(10):e29417076546
Cites: Int J Nurs Pract. 2007 Feb;13(1):61-817244246
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2007 May;14(3):329-4317459817
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007 Jun;6(2):121-916877043
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2008 May;18(5):670-8518223158
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2008 Jun;62(6):657-6418503649
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2008 Jul;17(14):1897-90618592617
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2009 Jan;19(1):17-2919029242
Cites: Nurs Res. 2009 Jan-Feb;58(1):52-6219092555
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Dec 25;359(26):2748-5119109572
Cites: PLoS Med. 2009 Aug;6(8):e100008619668360
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2009 Dec;8(5):349-5419744889
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2010 Jan;47(1):89-10719854441
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2010 Feb;47(2):154-6519577752
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2010 Jul;47(7):909-1720417514
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2010 Jul;20(7):922-3019959823
Cites: J Hosp Med. 2010 Jul-Aug;5(6):335-820803671
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Oct;51(7):1087-11011005395
PubMed ID
22748059 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hemodialysis in a satellite unit: clinical performance target attainment and health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134551
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Jul;6(7):1692-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Michael J Diamant
Ann Young
Kerri Gallo
Wang Xi
Rita S Suri
Amit X Garg
Louise M Moist
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011 Jul;6(7):1692-9
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Care Facilities - standards
Biological Markers - blood
Calcium - blood
Chi-Square Distribution
Community health centers - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Hemodialysis Units, Hospital - standards
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - psychology - therapy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Phosphates - blood
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Renal Dialysis - adverse effects - standards
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Serum Albumin - analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In Canada, patients are increasingly receiving hemodialysis (HD) in satellite units, which are closer to their community but further from tertiary care hospitals and their nephrologists. The process of care is different in the satellites with fewer visits from nephrologists and reliance on remote communication. The objective of this study is to compare clinical performance target attainment and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients receiving HD in satellite versus in-center units.
The London Health Sciences Centre in London, Ontario, Canada, has both tertiary care center and satellite HD units. All eligible patients who received dialysis treatment at one of these units as of July 24, 2008, were enrolled into a cross-sectional study (n = 522). Patient attainment of hemoglobin, albumin, calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) product, Kt/V, and vascular access targets were compared. Participants were also administered the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short-Form questionnaire.
Satellite patients were more likely to attain clinical performance targets for albumin (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 4.87 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.13 to 11.14]), hemoglobin (OR = 1.59 [95% CI: 1.08 to 2.35]), and Ca-P product (OR = 2.02 [95% CI: 1.14 to 3.60]), as well as for multiple targets (P
PubMed ID
21566106 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.