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284 records – page 1 of 29.

Ability to solve problems, professionalism, management, empathy, and working capacity in occupational therapy--the professional self description form.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73247
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M T Gullberg
H M Olsson
G. Alenfelt
A B Ivarsson
M. Nilsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Empathy
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Problem Solving
Professional Competence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Abstract
The majority of occupational therapists in Sweden previously worked on large occupational therapy wards. Health care policy has changed over the years and the system has been reorganized accordingly. The employment situation for occupational therapists has also changed. This paper focuses on the perception of professional self among occupational therapists. The objective was to explore the professional self and to suggest components important to the occupational therapist profession. The Professional Self Description Form (PSDF) was used for the exploration of self. The 19 items in the PSDF cover areas relevant to professional functioning and activity. Sixty-eight employed occupational therapists participated. The results of the PSDF were subjected to factor analysis and five factors were obtained; Ability to solve problems, Professionalism, Management, Empathy, and Working capacity. We believe that these five factors can function as improving domains of the role of the professional occupational therapist in Sweden.
PubMed ID
7724926 View in PubMed
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Achieving clinical improvement: an interdisciplinary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187771
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Diane M Irvine Doran
G Ross Baker
Michael Murray
John Bohnen
Catherine Zahn
Souraya Sidani
Jennifer Carryer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Group Processes
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - standards
Problem Solving
Staff Development
Total Quality Management
Abstract
This study evaluates whether training health care teams in continuous quality improvement methods results in improvements in the care of and outcomes for patients. Nine of the 25 teams who participated in the study were successful in improving the care/outcomes for patients. Successful teams were more effective at problem solving, engaged in more functional group interactions, and were more likely to have physician participation.
PubMed ID
12433246 View in PubMed
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Adolescents in rural communities seeking help: who reports problems and who sees professionals?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181394
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2004 Feb;45(2):396-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Heather A Sears
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada. hsears@unb.ca
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2004 Feb;45(2):396-404
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Problem Solving
Rural Population
Abstract
This study examined whether adolescents who were at various stages of the help-seeking process differed on demographic characteristics, use of informal helpers, and markers of emotional and behavioral adjustment.
Youths (N = 644; Grades 7-12) living in three rural communities completed a survey at school. Three comparisons were made: teenagers who reported having serious problems versus few or no problems in the past year; teenagers who felt that they did or did not need professional help with these problems; and teenagers who had or had not sought professional help.
Rural youths with serious problems were more likely to be girls and to be living with someone other than a parent, were less likely to talk to family members about problems, and reported more negative emotional and behavioral adjustment. Teenagers who perceived a need for professional help also reported poorer emotional and behavioral adjustment. Adolescents who sought professional help were more likely to be in senior high, were less likely to talk to others about problems, and were lower on anxiety.
Rural adolescents' demographic characteristics, use of informal helpers, and markers of emotional and behavioral adjustment each contribute to our understanding of their help-seeking behavior. Future studies must examine how these and other variables combine to discern who reports problems, who perceives a need for help, and who sees professionals.
PubMed ID
14982252 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' own suggestions for bullying interventions at age 13 and 16.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98941
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2010 Apr 1;51(2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2010
Author
Ann Frisén
Kristina Holmqvist
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2010 Apr 1;51(2):123-31
Date
Apr-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Age Factors
Attitude
Empathy
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Problem Solving
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Control, Informal
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
In this study we examined adolescents' perspectives on what interventions they consider to be effective in order to stop the bullying of a student. The adolescents' suggestions were reviewed at two time points, age 13 and 16. Participants were 474 girls and 403 boys at the first point of examination, and 429 girls and 332 boys at the second point of examination. The participants' suggestions were divided into categories based on some of the anti-bullying strategies commonly presented by researchers. Results showed that some anti-bullying strategies were more salient than others in the adolescents' suggestions, and that their suggestions differed as a function of age, sex and to some extent, current experience of victimization. Having serious talks with the students involved was among the most common suggestions at both ages. However, girls were more likely than boys, and non-victims were more likely than victims, to suggest this particular strategy.
PubMed ID
19674402 View in PubMed
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Advancing complex explanatory conceptualizations of daily negative and positive affect: trigger and maintenance coping action patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256512
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2014 Jan;61(1):93-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
David M Dunkley
Denise Ma
Ihno A Lee
Kristopher J Preacher
David C Zuroff
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lady Davis Institute-Jewish General Hospital.
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2014 Jan;61(1):93-109
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Affect
Concept Formation
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Problem Solving
Psychometrics
Psychotherapy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Abstract
The present study addressed a fundamental gap between research and clinical work by advancing complex explanatory conceptualizations of coping action patterns that trigger and maintain daily negative affect and (low) positive affect. One hundred ninety-six community adults completed measures of perfectionism, and then 6 months later completed questionnaires at the end of the day for 14 consecutive days to provide simultaneous assessments of appraisals, coping, and affect across different stressful situations in everyday life. Multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) supported complex explanatory conceptualizations that demonstrated (a) disengagement trigger patterns consisting of several distinct appraisals (e.g., event stress) and coping strategies (e.g., avoidant coping) that commonly operate together across many different stressors when the typical individual experiences daily increases in negative affect and drops in positive affect; and (b) disengagement maintenance patterns composed of different appraisal and coping maintenance factors that, in combination, can explain why individuals with higher levels of self-critical perfectionism have persistent daily negative affect and low positive mood 6 months later. In parallel, engagement patterns (triggers and maintenance) composed of distinct appraisals (e.g., perceived social support) and coping strategies (e.g., problem-focused coping) were linked to compensatory experiences of daily positive affect. These findings demonstrate the promise of using daily diary methodologies and MSEM to promote a shared understanding between therapists and clients of trigger and maintenance coping action patterns that explain what precipitates and perpetuates clients' difficulties, which, in turn, can help achieve the 2 overarching therapy goals of reducing clients' distress and bolstering resilience.
Notes
Erratum In: J Couns Psychol. 2014 Apr;61(2):263
PubMed ID
24447060 View in PubMed
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Alaska unit assists wounded, ill, injured soldiers with difficult adjustments after life's 'curveballs'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264736
Source
Alaska Med. 2013 Sep;54:23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013

All professionals are equal but some professionals are more equal than others? Dominance, status and efficiency in Swedish interprofessional teams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129111
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Sep;26(3):505-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Ingela Thylefors
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. ingela.thylefors@psy.gu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Sep;26(3):505-12
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Problem Solving
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
This study explored status differences in interprofessional teams and their link with efficiency. In total, 62 teams (423 individuals) from occupational health-care, psychiatry, rehabilitation and school health-care responded to a questionnaire. Fifty-four of those teams (360 individuals) also participated in an observation session simulating problem-solving team meetings. Data were reduced to a number of indexes: self-assessed/perceived equality, functional influence and efficiency; and observed verbal dominance/activity and problem-solving capacity. Perceived status differences within the teams appeared moderate, irrespective of professional belonging. With respect to verbal dominance during meetings, however, the findings revealed a hierarchy with psychologists, physicians and social workers at the top together with special education teachers. No relationship was found between self-assessed efficiency and actual problem-solving nor between observed verbal activity and problem-solving. The findings suggest that different problems may demand different prerequisites to be solved effectively: successful solving of simple convergent problems correlated negatively with equality, whereas functional influence was a predictor of success with respect to divergent, complex problem-solving. The findings raise questions about leadership and procedures during team meetings.
PubMed ID
22142248 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A measure of professors' attitudes towards the creativity of student nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227538
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1991;23(1):41-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
D. Gravelle
H. Lazure
M. Reidy
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1991;23(1):41-55
Date
1991
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Creativity
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Problem Solving
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Creativity and problem solving are closely related in the learning and practice of nursing. The problem underlying this study concerns the attitudes of professors of nursing in 321 French language community colleges in Quebec toward the creative characteristics of their students. However, given the absence of a valid and reliable French instrument, this study focused on the validation of a French version of Torrance's Ideal Pupil Checklist. Content, construct and criteria validity were all verified, as well as the stability and homogeneity aspects of reliability.
PubMed ID
1802366 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Swedish Forest Owners' Information and Knowledge-Sharing Networks for Decision-Making: Insights for Climate Change Communication and Adaptation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285685
Source
Environ Manage. 2017 Jun;59(6):885-897
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Karin André
Julia Baird
Åsa Gerger Swartling
Gregor Vulturius
Ryan Plummer
Source
Environ Manage. 2017 Jun;59(6):885-897
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Communication
Community participation
Decision Making
Forestry - methods
Forests
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Perception
Problem Solving
Social Networking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To further the understanding of climate change adaptation processes, more attention needs to be paid to the various contextual factors that shape whether and how climate-related knowledge and information is received and acted upon by actors involved. This study sets out to examine the characteristics of forest owners' in Sweden, the information and knowledge-sharing networks they draw upon for decision-making, and their perceptions of climate risks, their forests' resilience, the need for adaptation, and perceived adaptive capacity. By applying the concept of ego-network analysis, the empirical data was generated by a quantitative survey distributed to 3000 private forest owners' in Sweden in 2014 with a response rate of 31%. The results show that there is a positive correlation, even though it is generally weak, between forest owner climate perceptions and (i) network features, i.e. network size and heterogeneity, and (ii) presence of certain alter groups (i.e. network members or actors). Results indicate that forest owners' social networks currently serve only a minimal function of sharing knowledge of climate change and adaptation. Moreover, considering the fairly infrequent contact between respondents and alter groups, the timing of knowledge sharing is important. In conclusion we suggest those actors that forest owners' most frequently communicate with, especially forestry experts providing advisory services (e.g. forest owner associations, companies, and authorities) have a clear role to communicate both the risks of climate change and opportunities for adaptation. Peers are valuable in connecting information about climate risks and adaptation to the actual forest property.
Notes
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2016 Jun;30(3):582-9226801337
Cites: Ambio. 2014 Oct;43(6):745-5824570210
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Dec 21;107(51):22026-3121135232
Cites: Am J Bot. 2009 Oct;96(10):1767-7821622297
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Sep;66(9):759-6022766781
Cites: J Environ Manage. 2012 Apr 15;96(1):17-2522208394
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e5018223185568
PubMed ID
28275850 View in PubMed
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284 records – page 1 of 29.