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1296 records – page 1 of 130.

A 6-year nationwide cohort study of glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes. Risk markers for the development of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32420
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Olsen
A. Sjølie
P. Hougaard
J. Johannesen
K. Borch-Johnsen
K. Marinelli
B. Thorsteinsson
S. Pramming
H B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Neuropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Neurologic Examination
Perception
Probability
Risk factors
Vibration
Abstract
The study aimed to identify risk markers (present at the start of the study in 1989) for the occurrence and progression of microvascular complications 6 years later (in 1995) in a Danish nationwide cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (average age at entry 13.7 years). Probabilities for the development of elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), retinopathy, and increased vibration perception threshold (VPT) could then be estimated from a stepwise logistic regression model. A total of 339 patients (47% of the original cohort) were studied. Sex, age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen and dose, height, weight, HbA(1c), blood pressure, and AER were recorded. In addition, information on retinopathy, neuropathy (VPT), and anti-hypertensive treatment was obtained at the end of the study. HbA(1c) (normal range 4.3-5.8, mean 5.3%) and AER (upper normal limit or =20 microg min(-1)) was found in 12.8% of the patients in 1995, and risk markers for this were increased AER and high HbA(1c), in 1989 (both p6.5 V) was found in 62.5% of patients in 1995, for which the risk markers were male sex (p
PubMed ID
11120452 View in PubMed
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A 10 year follow up of parenteral gold therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14307
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
G. Bendix
A. Bjelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Drug Tolerance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the long term tolerance of parenteral gold and subsequent drug treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including prediction of outcome and 'survival' of sequential treatments. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 376 patients was made, including a detailed screening of 237 patients treated in 1989. Reasons for discontinuing treatment were analysed in life table analyses, which were used to compare patients receiving parenteral gold treatment in 1985 and 1989, and two groups of patients receiving disease modifying antirheumatic drugs after parenteral gold treatment. The causes of discontinuation were followed in sequential treatments. RESULTS: The estimated probability of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment was 29% after six months and 42%, 55%, 74%, and 92% after 1, 2, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Mucocutaneous side effects were the main cause of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment during the first three years, while the probability of discontinuation because of inefficacy dominated after four years. Side effects also constituted the main cause of discontinuation of treatments given after parenteral gold treatment during the first three years of follow up. No significant differences were found when comparing the termination rates between the first and the second and subsequent treatments after parenteral gold treatment. The main reasons for discontinuing one treatment could not predict the cause of discontinuation of the next treatment. CONCLUSION: Mucocutaneous side effects dominated initially, while inefficacy was the dominating cause of discontinuation of long term parenteral gold treatment. No serious side effects were registered. The cause of discontinuation of one treatment did not predict the cause of discontinuation of the following drug. Drug 'survival' was the same in both treatments after parenteral gold treatment.
PubMed ID
8712879 View in PubMed
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30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273361
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sahar Hassani
Anja Schou Lindman
Doris Tove Kristoffersen
Oliver Tomic
Jon Helgeland
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Episode of Care
Hospital Mortality
Hospital records
Hospitals - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient transfer
Probability
Quality Improvement
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC) reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no), as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator.
Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture) are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall) 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days) is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated survival probabilities for AMI in 2011 varied from 80.6% (in the hospital with lowest estimated survival) to 91.7% (in the hospital with highest estimated survival), whereas it ranged from 83.8% to 91.2% in 2013.
Since 2011, several hospitals and hospital trusts have initiated quality improvement projects, and some of the hospitals have improved the survival over these years. Public reporting of survival/mortality indicators are increasingly being used as quality measures of health care systems. Openness regarding the methods used to calculate the indicators are important, as it provides the opportunity of critically reviewing and discussing the methods in the literature. In this way, the methods employed for establishing the indicators may be improved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26352600 View in PubMed
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Academic stream and tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis use among Ontario high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223837
Source
Int J Addict. 1992 May;27(5):561-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
K R Allison
Author Affiliation
North York Community Health Promotion Research Unit, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Addict. 1992 May;27(5):561-70
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Competency-Based Education
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology
Probability
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Conditions
Students
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between academic stream and cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use among 2,543 high school students as part of the Ontario Student Drug Survey (1987). Students in basic and general academic streams were found to have significantly higher levels of cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use compared to advanced level students. The effects of academic stream remain significant (except for alcohol use) when gender, grade average, drug education lessons, and pressure to use these substances are included in multiple regression analysis. The findings indicate that the process of academic streaming needs to be further examined as a possible precipitating factor in drug use.
PubMed ID
1601538 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and consistency of quadratic odds estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225712
Source
Fam Pract. 1991 Sep;8(3):269-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
B W Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824.
Source
Fam Pract. 1991 Sep;8(3):269-75
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Michigan - epidemiology
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Office Visits
Ontario
Probability
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
In medical practices that do not have rosters, only the number of patients who come to the practice can be enumerated: the number who might have visited if they had had a reason to do so remains unknown. The Quadratic Odds Estimator is a technique for estimating the total number of patients cared for by a primary care medical practice, including the non-visitors. A revised version of the model is shown to have an error of less than 1% in predicting the number of patients at risk of visiting a primary care medical practice. Aggregate and sex-specific estimates of total practice size are shown to be comparable to within 2%. The model estimates the prevalence of hypertension among the patients of two family practice resdencies as 18 and 11%. The rationale for employing unconventional regression weights and dual regressions is explained.
PubMed ID
1959728 View in PubMed
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Accuracy at radiography and probing for the diagnosis of proximal caries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238995
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1985 Apr;93(2):178-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1985
Author
I. Mejàre
H G Gröndahl
K. Carlstedt
A C Grever
E. Ottosson
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1985 Apr;93(2):178-84
Date
Apr-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicuspid - radiography
Dental Caries - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiography
False Positive Reactions
Humans
Periodontics - instrumentation
Probability
Sweden
Abstract
In 63 teenagers the proximal surfaces of premolars to be extracted for orthodontic reasons and the adjacent surfaces of neighboring teeth, 598 surfaces in all, were examined radiographically and by probing. Direct inspection after extraction revealed that 51% of the surfaces had incipient carious lesions and 5% lesions with cavities. Of the surfaces with cavities 82.1% were correctly diagnosed radiographically if any radiolucency, regardless of its extent, was used as a diagnostic criterion. However, this yielded a false positive rate of 19.6%. If only radiolucencies extending at least into the inner third of the enamel were called positive the true positive rate was 36.7% and the associated false positive rate 1.6%. At a 5% cavity frequency the predictive positive values were 17% and 53%, respectively. Probing yielded a true positive rate of about 29% and a false positive rate of 1.1% with a predictive positive value of 50-57%. All radiolucencies extending into the dentin were associated with cavities. When the most liberal radiographic criterion was used 37.5% of all carious lesions, whether associated with a cavity or not, were detected and 3.8% of sound surfaces were falsely called carious. The corresponding predictive positive value at the actual rate of incipient lesions and lesions with cavities was 92.6%.
PubMed ID
3858967 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Third Molar Eruption Predictor in predicting eruption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194372
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
I. Ventä
S. Schou
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. irja.venta@helsinki.fi
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Calibration
Denmark
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting - methods
Humans
Male
Molar - radiography
Molar, Third - physiology - radiography
Observer Variation
Odontometry
Probability
Radiography, Panoramic
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Tooth Crown - radiography
Tooth Eruption
Tooth, Impacted - physiopathology
Tooth, Unerupted - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
To evaluate the possibility of applying the Third Molar Eruption Predictor to all panoramic radiographs.
Panoramic radiographs were retrospectively analyzed from a 4-year follow-up study of third molars carried out at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. The radiographs, taken at a mean age of 20.6 years, included 45 unerupted or partially erupted mandibular third molars in 28 subjects. Because the device was calibrated both with simple proportions and by use of the methods of Bayes' Decision Theory, the separation point of the device was therefore adjusted at 12 mm from the distal surface of the second molar.
The predictions of future eruption or impaction made with the calibrated device and the actual clinical outcome 4 years later were in conformity for 80% of the mandibular third molars.
The Third Molar Eruption Predictor may be applied to all panoramic radiographs, but it seems to require calibration before use.
PubMed ID
11402274 View in PubMed
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Acidification of distal esophagus and sleep-related breathing disturbances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179752
Source
Chest. 2004 Jun;125(6):2101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Soren Berg
Victor Hoffstein
Thorarinn Gislason
Author Affiliation
Lund Sleep Study Group, Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Chest. 2004 Jun;125(6):2101-6
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - epidemiology - etiology
Esophagus - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Polysomnography - methods
Pressure
Probability
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sleep Stages
Abstract
To investigate whether distal esophageal acidification occurs during sleep in patients suspected of sleep-disordered breathing, and whether such acidification is related to respiratory abnormalities.
Fourteen middle-aged, snoring men all complaining of daytime sleepiness and suspected of having obstructive sleep apnea.
Sleep laboratory, Pulmonary Department, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Each patient underwent full nocturnal polysomnography testing, which included continuous monitoring of esophageal pressure (Pes) and pH. We identified all pH events, which were defined as a reduction in esophageal pH of >/= 1.0. During each pH event, the respiratory recordings where examined for the presence of apneas or hypopneas, and Pes was recorded. The data were analyzed to determine the possible relationships between pH events and respiratory events, and between changes in pH and changes in Pes. We found that there were more respiratory events than pH events. The mean (+/- SD) number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep was 33 +/- 22, whereas the mean number of pH events per hour of sleep was 7 +/- 6. Overall, 81% of all pH events were associated with respiratory events. Correlation analysis did not reveal any significant relationship between pH events and the magnitude of Pes or apnea-hypopnea index.
Episodes of esophageal acidification are common in patients with sleep apnea, and are usually associated with respiratory and pressure events. However, changes in pH were independent of the magnitude of the Pes.
PubMed ID
15189928 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture relieves pelvic and low-back pain in late pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58300
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Nina Kvorning
Catharina Holmberg
Lars Grennert
Anders Aberg
Jonas Akeson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Hospital of Helsingborg, Sweden. nina.kvorning-ternov@helsingborgslasarett.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):246-50
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - therapy
Pain Measurement
Pelvic Pain - diagnosis - therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - therapy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Probability
Reference Values
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effect and possible adverse effects of acupuncture for pelvic and low-back pain during the last trimester of pregnancy. METHODS: Following individual informed consent, 72 pregnant women reporting pelvic or low-back pain were randomized during pregnancy weeks 24-37 to an acupuncture group (n = 37) or to a control group (n = 35) at three maternity wards in southern Sweden. Traditional acupuncture points and local tender points (TP) were chosen according to individual pain patterns and stimulated once or twice a week until delivery or complete recovery in acupuncture patients. Control patients were given no sham stimulation. Throughout the study period each patient made weekly visual analog scale (VAS) evaluations of maximal and minimal pain intensity as well as three-point assessments of pain intensity during various activities. RESULTS: During the study period, VAS scorings of pain intensity decreased over time in 60% of patients in the acupuncture group and in 14% of those in the control group (p
PubMed ID
14995919 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of the major risk alleles of IRF5 and STAT4 in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90739
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Nordmark G.
Kristjansdottir G.
Theander E.
Eriksson P.
Brun J G
Wang C.
Padyukov L.
Truedsson L.
Alm G.
Eloranta M-L
Jonsson R.
Rönnblom L.
Syvänen A-C
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Gunnel.Nordmark@medsci.uu.se
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Humans
Interferon Regulatory Factors - genetics - immunology
Linear Models
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Probability
Risk factors
STAT4 Transcription Factor - genetics - immunology
Sjogren's Syndrome - genetics - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Primary Sj?gren's syndrome (SS) shares many features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we investigated the association of the three major polymorphisms in IRF5 and STAT4 found to be associated with SLE, in patients from Sweden and Norway with primary SS. These polymorphisms are a 5-bp CGGGG indel in the promoter of IRF5, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10488631 downstream of IRF5 and the STAT4 SNP rs7582694, which tags the major risk haplotype of STAT4. We observed strong signals for association between all three polymorphisms and primary SS, with odds ratios (ORs) >1.4 and P-values
PubMed ID
19092842 View in PubMed
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1296 records – page 1 of 130.