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304 records – page 1 of 31.

[Abolish the humiliating age limit of 65!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195893
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 6;97(49):5828
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-6-2000
Author
B. Blomquist
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 6;97(49):5828
Date
Dec-6-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Employment
Health Policy
Humans
Physicians
Prejudice
Private Sector
Public Sector
Sweden
PubMed ID
11188049 View in PubMed
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[About health care profit: USA is not a model!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161515
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Aug 8-21;104(32-33):2263
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bror Gårdelöf
Author Affiliation
Bror.Gardelov@lio.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Aug 8-21;104(32-33):2263
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce
Health Policy - economics
Health Services - economics
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics
Private Sector
Sweden
United States
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 2007 Jul 11-24;104(28-29):2091-217702384
PubMed ID
17822208 View in PubMed
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[About the mentally retarded in post-war Norway].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256712
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Jul 1;134(12-13):1263-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2014
Author
Linda H Nesby
Author Affiliation
Institutt for kultur og litteratur Fakultet for humaniora, samfunnsvitenskap og lærerutdanning Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges arktiske universitet.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Jul 1;134(12-13):1263-7
Date
Jul-1-2014
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intellectual Disability - therapy
Medicine in Literature
Mentally Disabled Persons
Norway
Nursing Homes
Private Sector
Sterilization, Involuntary - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The article takes as its subject Gaute Heivoll's latest novel Over det kinesiske hav [Across the Chinese Ocean], which describes the establishment of a private nursing home at Finsland in Vest-Agder county immediately before the liberation. The novel's protagonist describes retrospectively how his parents adopted a number of mentally disabled persons, among them a group of siblings from Stavanger. When their adoptive family is exposed to a tragedy, views on who are the providers and receivers of care are challenged, as are concepts such as madness and normality. The article shows how a fictional exposée of conditions for the mentally disabled in recent Norwegian history can provide new perspectives on historic health and care practices. Reading Gaute Heivoll's Over det kinesiske hav highlights the practice of placing patients in private care, as well as the 1934 Act that authorised the sterilisation of mentally disabled persons.
PubMed ID
24989210 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jan 16;176(2):209
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-16-2007
Author
Richard D Cohen
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jan 16;176(2):209
Date
Jan-16-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease
Disabled Persons
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Insurance Coverage
Private Sector
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Aug 15;175(4):329, 33116908885
Comment On: CMAJ. 2006 Aug 15;175(4):329, 33116908885
PubMed ID
17224603 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Access to and continuity of primary medical care of different providers as perceived by the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164689
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Pirjo Halonen
Arto Vehviläinen
Jorma Takala
Esko Kumpusalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Unit of Family Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pekka.mantyselka@uku.fi
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study people's views on the accessibility and continuity of primary medical care provided by different providers: a public primary healthcare centre (PPHC), occupational healthcare (OHC), and a private practice (PP).
A nationwide population-based questionnaire study.
Finland.
A total of 6437 (from a sample of 10,000) Finns aged 15-74 years.
Period of time (in days) to get an appointment with any physician was assessed via a single structured question. Accessibility and continuity were evaluated with a five-category Likert scale. Values 4-5 were regarded as good.
Altogether 72% had found that they could obtain an appointment with a physician within three days, while 6% had to wait more than two weeks. Older subjects and subjects with chronic diseases perceived waiting times as longer more often than younger subjects and those without chronic diseases. The proportion of subjects who perceived access to care to be good was 35% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 78% in a PP. The proportion of subjects who were able to get successive appointments with the same doctor was 45% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 81% in a PP. A personal doctor system was related to good continuity and access in a PPHC.
Access to and continuity of care in Finland are suboptimal for people suffering from chronic diseases. The core features of good primary healthcare are still not available within the medical care provided by public health centres.
Notes
Cites: Fam Pract. 2000 Jun;17(3):236-4210846142
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2000 Nov;50(460):882-711141874
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Jun;19(2):131-4411482415
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2002 Jun;52(479):459-6212051209
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2002 Oct;37(5):1403-1712479503
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):140-416923622
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Dec;10(4):290-41480869
Cites: J Fam Pract. 2004 Dec;53(12):974-8015581440
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jan 17;174(2):177-8316415462
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Mar;24(1):1-216464807
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;1(3):149-5515043376
PubMed ID
17354156 View in PubMed
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Accident rates and types among self-employed private forest owners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100478
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Ola Lindroos
Lage Burström
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden. ola.lindroos@srh.slu.se
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adult
Causality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forestry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Risk factors
Sick Leave
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
Half of all Swedish forests are owned by private individuals, and at least 215,000 people work in these privately owned forest holdings. However, only lethal accidents are systematically monitored among self-employed forest workers. Therefore, data from the registries of the Swedish Work Environment Authority, the Labor Insurance Organization and the regional University Hospital in Umeå were gathered to allow us to perform a more in-depth assessment of the rate and types of accidents that occurred among private forest owners. We found large differences between the registries in the type and number of accidents that were reported. We encountered difficulties in defining "self-employed forest worker" and also in determining whether the accidents that did occur happened during work or leisure time. Consequently, the estimates for the accident rate that we obtained varied from 32 to > or = 4300 injured persons per year in Sweden, depending on the registry that was consulted, the definition of the sample population that was used, and the accident severity definition that was employed. Nevertheless, the different registries gave a consistent picture of the types of accidents that occur while individuals are participating in self-employed forestry work. Severe accidents were relatively common, as self-employed forestry work fatalities constituted 7% of the total number of fatalities in the work authority registry. Falling trees were associated with many of these fatal accidents as well as with accidents that resulted in severe non-fatal injuries. Thus, unsafe work methods appeared more related to the occurrence of an accident than the equipment that was being used at the time of the accident (e.g., a chainsaw). Improvement of the workers' skills should therefore be considered to be an important prevention measure that should be undertaken in this field. The challenges in improving the safety in these smallest of companies, which fall somewhere between the purview of occupational and consumer safety, are exemplified and discussed.
PubMed ID
20728623 View in PubMed
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Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180338
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Bryn Williams-Jones
Janice E Graham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Research & Homerton College, University of Cambridge, UK.
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Research
Genetic Services - economics - ethics - trends
Genetic Testing - economics - ethics - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Industry
Internationality
Marketing
Models, organizational
Patents as Topic
Private Sector
Public Policy
Public Sector
Research Support as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Technology Transfer
Abstract
Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies.
PubMed ID
15115034 View in PubMed
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Addressing challenges in participatory research partnerships in the North: opening a conversation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120750
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Rhonda M Johnson
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Community-Based Participatory Research - ethics
Health Services Research
Humans
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):8-1817451130
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):19-3017451131
Cites: J Urban Health. 2007 Jul;84(4):478-9317436114
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):405-1319917192
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-922584512
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):473-8722067096
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-822584509
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-722584510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-722584511
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2010 Mar;25(1):115-2219854843
PubMed ID
22973564 View in PubMed
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Adopting and implementing nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities: public and private sector roles. A multiple case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124044
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dana Lee Olstad
Kim D Raine
Linda J McCargar
Author Affiliation
Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition, 4-126 Li Ka Shing Centre, 8606 112 St, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Food - standards
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Obesity - prevention & control
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Facilities
Qualitative Research
Recreation
Abstract
Recreational facilities are an important community resource for health promotion because they provide access to affordable physical activities. However, despite their health mandate, many have unhealthy food environments that may paradoxically increase the risk of childhood obesity. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY) are government-initiated, voluntary guidelines intended to facilitate children's access to healthy food and beverage choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities, however few recreational facilities are using them.
We used mixed methods within an exploratory multiple case study to examine factors that influenced adoption and implementation of the ANGCY and the nature of the food environment within three cases: an adopter, a semi-adopter and a non-adopter of the ANGCY. Diffusion of Innovations theory provided the theoretical platform for the study. Qualitative data were generated through interviews, observations, and document reviews, and were analysed using directed content analysis. Set theoretic logic was used to identify factors that differentiated adopters from the non-adopter. Quantitative sales data were also collected, and the quality of the food environment was scored using four complementary tools.
The keys to adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities related to the managers' nutrition-related knowledge, beliefs and perceptions, as these shaped his decisions and actions. The manager, however, could not accomplish adoption and implementation alone. Intersectoral linkages with schools and formal, health promoting partnerships with industry were also important for adoption and implementation to occur. The food environment in facilities that had adopted the ANGCY did not appear to be superior to the food environment in facilities that had not adopted the ANGCY.
ANGCY uptake may continue to falter under the current voluntary approach, as the environmental supports for voluntary action are poor. Where ANGCY uptake does occur, changes to the food environment may be relatively minor. Stronger government measures may be needed to require recreational facilities to improve their food environments and to limit availability of unhealthy foods.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):310-419722347
Cites: Milbank Q. 2004;82(4):581-62915595944
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 May;7(5):2208-2120623020
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PubMed ID
22632384 View in PubMed
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304 records – page 1 of 31.