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The 2004 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part III--Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181497
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
R M Touyz
N. Campbell
A. Logan
N. Gledhill
R. Petrella
R. Padwal
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. touyzr@icrm.qc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Primary prevention - methods
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Societies, Medical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations regarding the role of lifestyle modification in the treatment and prevention of hypertension.
Lifestyle modification interventions including exercise, weight reduction, alcohol consumption, dietary modification, intake of dietary cations and stress management are reviewed. Antioxidants and fish oil supplements are also reviewed, although specific recommendations cannot be made at present.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from January 2002 to September 2003 to update the 2001 recommendations for the management of hypertension. Supplemental searches in the Cochrane Collaboration databases were also performed. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodology experts.
Key recommendations include the following: lifestyle modification should be extended to nonhypertensive individuals who are at risk for developing high blood pressure; 30 min to 45 min of aerobic exercise should be performed on most days (four to five days) of the week; an ideal body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) should be maintained and weight loss strategies should use a multidisciplinary approach; alcohol consumption should be limited to two drinks or fewer per day, and weekly intake should not exceed 14 standard drinks for men and nine standard drinks for women; a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy products, and maintains an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium, should be followed; salt intake should be restricted to 65 mmol/day to 100 mmol/day in hypertensive individuals and less than 100 mmol/day in normotensive individuals at high risk for developing hypertension; and stress management should be considered as an intervention in selected individuals.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Individuals with irreconcilable competing interests (declared by all members, compiled and circulated before the meeting) relative to any specific recommendation were excluded from voting on that recommendation. Only those recommendations achieving at least 70% consensus are reported here. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968143 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A campaign against home accidents--accident prevention efforts in the communities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228180
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1990
Author
F. Thuen
K I Klepp
R. Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Date
Oct-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Norway
Primary prevention - methods
Abstract
A nation-wide campaign aimed at preventing accidents in the home is being implemented in Norway. 95% of the municipalities acknowledge having received information material from the campaign, 33% report having established accident prevention committees, and 26% report having introduced preventive measures as a result of this national campaign. The study indicates that accidents are not recognized as yet as a major health problem in many municipalities. Identification of accidents as a health problem seems to be an important factor in the preventive efforts. To enhance further accident prevention efforts it seems important to increase awareness of accident as a health problem, and to increase the involvement of key personnel within the community.
PubMed ID
2256065 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence level of antihypertensive agents in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146044
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Jan;69(1):74-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Sylvie Perreault
Alice Dragomir
Louise Roy
Michel White
Lucie Blais
Lyne Lalonde
Anick Bérard
Author Affiliation
Faculties of Pharmacy and Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sylvie.perreault@umontreal.ca
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Jan;69(1):74-84
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Complications - prevention & control
Dyslipidemias - complications
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Incidence
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Primary prevention - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
* Non-adherence is probably an important source of preventable cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. * However, until now there have been very few large effectiveness studies assessing the relationship between adherence levels to antihypertensive medication and major cardiovascular outcomes for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
* The study results suggest that there is an association between better adherence to antihypertensive agents and a relative risk reduction of coronary artery disease. * Adherence to antihypertensive agents needs to be improved so that patients can benefit from the full protective effects of antihypertensive therapies.
Antihypertensive (AH) agents have been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, including coronary artery disease (CAD). Previous surveys have shown that a substantial number of patients with diagnosed hypertension remain uncontrolled. Non-adherence to AH agents may reduce the effectiveness. The aim was to evaluate the impact of better adherence to AH agents on the occurrence of CAD in a real clinical setting.
A cohort of 83 267 patients was reconstructed using the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec databases. Patients were eligible if they were between 45 and 85 years of age without indication of cardiovascular disease, and had been newly treated with AH agents between 1999 and 2004. A nested case-control design was used to study the incidence of CAD. Every case of CAD was matched for age and duration of follow-up to up to 15 randomly selected controls. The adherence level was measured by calculating the medication possession ratio. Cases' adherence was calculated from the start of follow-up to the time of the CAD (index date). For controls, adherence was calculated from the start of follow-up to the time of selection (index date). Rate ratios of CAD were estimated by conditional logistic regression adjusting for covariables.
The mean patient age was 65 years, 37% were male, 8% had diabetes and 18% had dyslipidaemia. High adherence level (96%) to AH therapy compared with lower adherence level (59%) was associated with a relative risk reduction of CAD events (rate ratios 0.90; 0.84, 0.95). Risk factors for CAD were male gender, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and developing a cardiovascular condition disease during follow-up.
Our study suggests that better adherence to AH agents is associated with a risk reduction of CAD. Adherence to AH agents needs to be improved so that patients can benefit from the full protective effects of AH therapies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20078615 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(11):1055-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
E. Juvonen
E. Ikkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(11):1055-60
Date
1997
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemoglobins - analysis - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Male
Polycythemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Primary prevention - methods
Risk assessment
Risk factors
PubMed ID
11466859 View in PubMed
Less detail

The alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene lung cancer prevention study: design, methods, participant characteristics, and compliance. The ATBC Cancer Prevention Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219137
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-10
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - therapeutic use
Aged
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Clinical Protocols
Double-Blind Method
Drug Monitoring
Drug Therapy, Combination
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Population Surveillance
Primary prevention - methods
Research Design
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene
Abstract
The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Lung Cancer Prevention Study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 x 2 factorial design, primary prevention trial testing the hypothesis that alpha-tocopherol (50 mg/day) and beta-carotene (20 mg/day) supplements reduce the incidence of lung cancer and possibly other cancers. Total and disease-specific mortality and incidence of various diseases and symptoms were monitored for safety. Between 1985 and 1993, 29,133 eligible male smokers aged 50 to 69 years at entry were randomized to receive daily active supplements or placebo capsules for 5 to 8 years (median 6.1 years), accumulating 169,751 follow-up years. This report describes the study design, methods, and protocol as well as the baseline characteristics and capsule compliance of the participants. The ATBC Study is the largest lung cancer chemoprevention trial conducted to date.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):758205274
PubMed ID
8205268 View in PubMed
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[A method for the prognostication and correction of meteopathic reactions. A medical technology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121431
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2012 Mar-Apr;(2):51-4
Publication Type
Article

An approach to the prevention of anxiety-related disorders based on evolutionary medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70722
Source
Prev Med. 2005 Jun;40(6):904-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Bjørn Grinde
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. bjorn.grinde@fhi.no
Source
Prev Med. 2005 Jun;40(6):904-9
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control
Fear - physiology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Primary prevention - methods
Psychophysiology - methods
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - genetics
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anxiety-related disorders are among the more common ailments of modern societies. Presumably, their prevalence is partly due to environmental factors, which suggests that anxiety may be one of the health problems that are aggravated by discords (adverse mismatches) between the present way of life and what our genes are adapted to. Consequently, it may be possible to find preventive measures by using the perspective of evolutionary medicine. I shall argue that the prevalence of anxiety-related problems reflects that the nerve circuitry and endocrine activity associated with the fear function have developed beyond normal. Moreover, that this expansion is due to excessive or abnormal triggering, particularly at an early age. Possible discords that may be responsible, such as present child care practices, will be discussed.
PubMed ID
15850894 View in PubMed
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276 records – page 1 of 28.