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How to promote prevention--economic incentives or legal regulations or both?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184764
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2003 Jun;29(3):239-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Kjell Torén
Thomas Sterner
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. kjell.toren@ymk.gu.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2003 Jun;29(3):239-45
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Policy - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Promotion - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Exposure - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Primary Prevention - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Legal regulations of the work environment are probably regarded as the main tools for promoting prevention at the workplace. Legal regulations are expressed as occupational exposure limits, bans, and taxes. Taxes can be regarded as economic incentives as well, and other economic incentives are insurance systems for employers' and consumers' actions. The latter have been found to have profound effects regarding environmental issues and may also, in the future, be a powerful tool for workplace-related prevention. The research in this area is rather limited, but there are some research results that can be obtained from the area of environmental economics. This paper discusses some examples in which legal regulations, economic incentives, or both have been used. Legal regulations and market-based economic incentives may produce similar results, but the economic cost and political feasibility typically differ. This situation makes the selection and design of instruments an important field for future research.
PubMed ID
12828394 View in PubMed
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