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Adolescent health, school health activities, community contexts, and health surveys in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9622
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2003 Oct;33(4):226-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Kristina Berg-Kelly
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg University, Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Göteborg, Sweden. kristina@bob-kelly.se
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2003 Oct;33(4):226-30
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Community Health Planning
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Risk-Taking
School Health Services - organization & administration
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
School health activities have been very important in improving adolescent health in Sweden for almost 200 years. In the 1800s, emphasis was on medical services. Vaccination programs and medical examinations became the key issues. Deterioration of adolescent health in the 1960s changed the objectives of both school education and health services to health promotion. Important members of the community followed suit and involvement of the local community has remained a hallmark, even though the extent and direction varies. The subsequent period was characterized by substantial improvement in adolescent health behavior. The latter years of the 1980s and the 1990s saw deterioration of adolescent health behavior. Less emphasis on health promotion, decentralization of school health responsibility from physicians to administrators, and heavy savings directed toward schools were important mediators. Adolescents were also more engaged in international youth cultures with liberal practices, such as drug use. Community surveys of adolescent health behaviors have proven to be important in mobilizing broad local involvement in adolescent health promotion. The lesson learned is that health promotion has to involve as many community members as possible. Coordinating resources and having unified objectives is cost efficient
Notes
Comment In: J Adolesc Health. 2003 Oct;33(4):213-414519559
PubMed ID
14519563 View in PubMed
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Au coeur de la vie: the Quebec Heart Health Dissemination Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192726
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Renaud
G. Paradis
Author Affiliation
Direction de la santé publique de Montréal-Centre, Université de Montréal, département de médecine sociale et préventive, Montréal, Québec.
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:22-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Information Services - organization & administration
National health programs - organization & administration
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
"Au coeur de la vie" is a research project which aims to evaluate the impact of a heart health dissemination program on primary and secondary prevention practices in local community clinics in the province of Quebec, Canada. Because the project starts in 2001 and no data has been collected to date this paper presents the theoretical model, the objectives of the program, the description of the dissemination procedures, and a brief overview of the evaluation.
PubMed ID
11677819 View in PubMed
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A BALANCING VIEW: Dysplasia surveillance in ulcerative colitis--sorting the pro from the con.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178662
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1636-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, 804F-715 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3P4, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1636-7
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - pathology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Colonoscopy - standards - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - pathology
Prevalence
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Risk assessment
Notes
Comment On: Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1633-615330892
Comment On: Am J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;99(9):1631-315330891
PubMed ID
15330893 View in PubMed
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Canada's programs to prevent mental health problems in children: the research-practice gap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177737
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1069-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2004
Author
John D McLennan
Harriet L MacMillan
Ellen Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1069-71
Date
Oct-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - therapy
Mental health
Preventive Medicine - organization & administration
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Research
Notes
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;40(7 Suppl):24S-51S11434483
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jul 28;323(7306):194-811473908
Cites: Prev Sci. 2001 Mar;2(1):1-1311519371
Cites: Prev Sci. 2001 Dec;2(4):209-2711833925
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Sep;110(3):486-9612205249
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2002 Oct;29(5):620-3912238705
Cites: Prev Sci. 2002 Dec;3(4):257-6512458764
Cites: Future Child. 1999 Spring-Summer;9(1):152-7810414015
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Aug 27;278(8):644-529272896
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Aug 27;278(8):637-439272895
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 12;273(14):1106-127707598
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1990 Aug;58(4):437-462212181
Cites: Pediatrics. 1982 Dec;70(6):883-947145543
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jun;94(6):1027-915249310
Cites: Am Psychol. 1999 Sep;54(9):755-6410510665
PubMed ID
15505271 View in PubMed
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Cancer 2000: the need for coordination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224659
Source
J Palliat Care. 1992;8(1):9-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

Capacity building for health promotion and chronic disease prevention--Nova Scotia's experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192727
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
S. Heath
J. Farquharson
D R MacLean
K. Barkhouse
C. Latter
C. Joffres
Author Affiliation
Heart Health Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Promot Educ. 2001;Suppl 1:17-22
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Logistic Models
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Nova Scotia
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development - methods
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to report on the capacity building efforts that took place during the dissemination research phase of Heart Health Nova Scotia (HHNS). HHNS, a health promotion research team, is funded by Health Canada and the Nova Scotia Department of Health. It is located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, a province of 937,000 people situated on the east coast of Canada. It has been a member of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative since its inception in 1989. The first phase of the program, Demonstration, was successfully completed in December 1995 (Heart Health Nova Scotia, 1995). In 1996, HHNS entered its second phase, Dissemination Research, which was conducted between April 1996 and March 2001 in the Western Health Region of Nova Scotia. This was completed in collaboration with organizations, community groups, and government agencies who joined HHNS to form the Heart Health Partnership (HHP) (Heart Health Nova Scotia, 2001). The main aim of this phase of the initiative was to build and research organizational capacity for health promotion and chronic disease prevention.
PubMed ID
11677818 View in PubMed
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Cardiac rehabilitation and the therapeutic environment: the importance of physical, social, and symbolic safety for programme participation among women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123453
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Aug;68(8):1834-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erica J Sutton
Danielle E Rolfe
Mireille Landry
Leonard Sternberg
Jennifer A D Price
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health & the Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. erica.sutton@utoronto.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Aug;68(8):1834-46
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy - organization & administration
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Preference
Power (Psychology)
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration
Safety
Women - psychology
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
To report an exploration of the multidimensionality of safety in cardiac rehabilitation programmes as perceived by women who were enrolled in the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative in Toronto, Canada.
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women. Although cardiac rehabilitation is clinically effective, significantly fewer women than men participate in available programmes. The literature identifies factors affecting women's cardiac rehabilitation participation, and provides possible explanations for this gender disparity. Although safety is mentioned among the barriers to women's cardiac rehabilitation participation, the extent to which safety contributes to programme participation, completion, and maintenance remains under-explored in the cardiac rehabilitation literature.
We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to examine the role safety and place play for women engaged in cardiac prevention and rehabilitation at the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative. Methods. From 2005-2006, 14 participants engaged in semi-structured, qualitative interviews lasting 30-90 minutes. Discussions addressed women's experiences at the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis.
Three themes were developed: 'Safety', which was sub-categorized according to physical, social, and symbolic interpretations of safety, 'searching for a sense of place', and 'confidence and empowerment'.
Feeling physically, socially, and symbolically safe in one's cardiac rehabilitation environment may contribute to programme adherence and exercise maintenance for women. Focusing on comprehensive notions of safety in future cardiac rehabilitation research could offer insight into why many women do not maintain an exercise regimen in currently structured cardiac rehabilitation and community programmes.
PubMed ID
22697385 View in PubMed
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Chest radiograph abnormalities associated with tuberculosis: reproducibility and yield of active cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190720
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2002 Feb;6(2):137-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
S. Graham
Gupta K Das
R J Hidvegi
R. Hanson
J. Kosiuk
Zahrani K Al
D. Menzies
Author Affiliation
Internal Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2002 Feb;6(2):137-42
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Canada - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Radiography, Thoracic - utilization
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - radiography
Urban Population
Abstract
Tertiary care referral centre specialising in respiratory diseases.
Chest radiography is a major screening and diagnostic tool for tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated the reproducibility of a radiographic classification system for screening for active TB of immigration applicants to Canada. We also evaluated the validity of this classification system for detection of prevalent active TB among the screened applicants, as well as tuberculin-positive close contacts and symptomatic patients.
Reproducibility was assessed by re-reading a randomly selected 10% sample of screening chest films. Validity was estimated from the final clinical and microbiologic diagnosis of patients undergoing detailed clinical evaluation.
Inter-reader agreement using five broad categories was moderate (kappas of 0.44-0.56), while intra-reader agreement was substantial (kappas of 0.59-0.72). After adjustment for age and patient group, the adjusted odds of active tuberculosis, relative to normal or minor findings or granulomas, for fibronodular changes was 10.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.2-33), for mass or pleural effusion it was 11.6 (95%CI 3.6-37), and for parenchymal infiltrate it was 46.1 (95%CI 18-117). Among tuberculin-positive close contacts, the probability of active tuberculosis was more than 50% if the radiographs showed any mass, pleural disease, or parenchymal infiltrates.
A simple classification of TB-related chest radiographic abnormalities into five broad categories had moderate to substantial reproducibility of readings, with reasonable validity.
PubMed ID
11931412 View in PubMed
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Children and heart health: the 2002 annual report card on Canadians' health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191205
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Feb;18(2):125-6, 128-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Christine LeGrand
Author Affiliation
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Feb;18(2):125-6, 128-9
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Child
Female
Health education
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
PubMed ID
11875580 View in PubMed
Less detail

123 records – page 1 of 13.