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The 2004 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part III--Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181497
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
R M Touyz
N. Campbell
A. Logan
N. Gledhill
R. Petrella
R. Padwal
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. touyzr@icrm.qc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Primary prevention - methods
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Societies, Medical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations regarding the role of lifestyle modification in the treatment and prevention of hypertension.
Lifestyle modification interventions including exercise, weight reduction, alcohol consumption, dietary modification, intake of dietary cations and stress management are reviewed. Antioxidants and fish oil supplements are also reviewed, although specific recommendations cannot be made at present.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from January 2002 to September 2003 to update the 2001 recommendations for the management of hypertension. Supplemental searches in the Cochrane Collaboration databases were also performed. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodology experts.
Key recommendations include the following: lifestyle modification should be extended to nonhypertensive individuals who are at risk for developing high blood pressure; 30 min to 45 min of aerobic exercise should be performed on most days (four to five days) of the week; an ideal body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) should be maintained and weight loss strategies should use a multidisciplinary approach; alcohol consumption should be limited to two drinks or fewer per day, and weekly intake should not exceed 14 standard drinks for men and nine standard drinks for women; a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy products, and maintains an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium, should be followed; salt intake should be restricted to 65 mmol/day to 100 mmol/day in hypertensive individuals and less than 100 mmol/day in normotensive individuals at high risk for developing hypertension; and stress management should be considered as an intervention in selected individuals.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Individuals with irreconcilable competing interests (declared by all members, compiled and circulated before the meeting) relative to any specific recommendation were excluded from voting on that recommendation. Only those recommendations achieving at least 70% consensus are reported here. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968143 View in PubMed
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The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 2 - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143444
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):249-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Nadia A Khan
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Simon W Rabkin
Rhian M Touyz
Norman R C Campbell
Raj Padwal
Tavis S Campbell
M Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Robert R Quinn
Jeff L Mahon
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Marcel Ruzicka
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
Marcel Lebel
Luc Poirier
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Mukul Sharma
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George K Dresser
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen D Burgess
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Richard E Gilbert
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Philip A McFarlane
Robert A Hegele
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):249-58
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Prevention - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Abstract
To update the evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2010.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, randomized trials and systematic reviews of trials were preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the general lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. Progressive renal impairment was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome among patients with chronic kidney disease.
A Cochrane Collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2008 to August 2009 to update the 2009 recommendations. To identify additional studies, reference lists were reviewed and experts were contacted. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
For lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat hypertension, restrict dietary sodium to 1500 mg (65 mmol) per day in adults 50 years of age or younger, to 1300 mg (57 mmol) per day in adults 51 to 70 years of age, and to 1200 mg (52 mmol) per day in adults older than 70 years of age; perform 30 min to 60 min of moderate aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m(2) to 24.9 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week for men or nine standard drinks per week for women; follow a diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources, and that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol; and consider stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should be predicated on the patient's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be decreased to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in patients with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients will require more than one agent to achieve these target blood pressures. Antihypertensive therapy should be considered in all adult patients regardless of age (caution should be exercised in elderly patients who are frail). For adults without compelling indications for other agents, considerations for initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics, angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in patients who are not black), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). A combination of two first-line agents may also be considered as initial treatment of hypertension if systolic blood pressure is 20 mmHg above target or if diastolic blood pressure is 10 mmHg above target. The combination of ACE inhibitors and ARBs should not be used, unless compelling indications are present to suggest consideration of dual therapy. Agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include thiazide diuretics, long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. In patients with coronary artery disease, ACE inhibitors, ARBs or betablockers are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor/diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with proteinuric nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (if intolerant to ACE inhibitors) are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. In selected high-risk patients in whom combination therapy is being considered, an ACE inhibitor plus a long-acting dihydropyridine CCB is preferable to an ACE inhibitor plus a thiazide diuretic. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian lipid treatment guidelines. Selected patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy, but who are otherwise at high risk for cardiovascular events, should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, low-dose acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 80% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
The Canadian Hypertension Education Program process is sponsored by the Canadian Hypertension Society, Blood Pressure Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Canadian Pharmacists Association, the Canadian Council of Cardiovascular Nurses, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20485689 View in PubMed
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[A campaign against home accidents--accident prevention efforts in the communities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228180
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1990
Author
F. Thuen
K I Klepp
R. Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Date
Oct-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Norway
Primary prevention - methods
Abstract
A nation-wide campaign aimed at preventing accidents in the home is being implemented in Norway. 95% of the municipalities acknowledge having received information material from the campaign, 33% report having established accident prevention committees, and 26% report having introduced preventive measures as a result of this national campaign. The study indicates that accidents are not recognized as yet as a major health problem in many municipalities. Identification of accidents as a health problem seems to be an important factor in the preventive efforts. To enhance further accident prevention efforts it seems important to increase awareness of accident as a health problem, and to increase the involvement of key personnel within the community.
PubMed ID
2256065 View in PubMed
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[A clinic for prevention of progression of kidney failure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164390
Source
J Ren Care. 2006 Jul-Sep;32(3):153-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Brousseau
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier Ambulatoire Régionale de Laval, Québec, Kanada. abrousse_charl@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
J Ren Care. 2006 Jul-Sep;32(3):153-6
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - diagnosis - prevention & control
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - prevention & control
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Patient care team
Patient Education as Topic
Peritoneal dialysis
Primary Prevention
Quebec
Renal Dialysis
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Abstract
Prevention in nephrology is only possible with the cooperation of patients and their families. The nurse plays a considerable role in working with patients and is a major player in the team, responsible for follow-up of the patient, where the earliest interventions can help delay and sometimes avoid dialysis. The hypertension clinic is the beginning of a continuum until dialysis. This paper describes three clinics that are managed in the renal service and indicates how they contribute to offering optimal care to a renal population.
PubMed ID
17393810 View in PubMed
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Active Smarter Kids (ASK): Rationale and design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of daily physical activity on children's academic performance and risk factors for non-communicable diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269990
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir K Resaland
Vegard Fusche Moe
Eivind Aadland
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Øyvind Glosvik
John R Andersen
Olav M Kvalheim
Heather A McKay
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Cluster analysis
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Promotion - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Physical Education and Training
Primary Prevention
Quality of Life
Risk factors
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Evidence is emerging from school-based studies that physical activity might favorably affect children's academic performance. However, there is a need for high-quality studies to support this. Therefore, the main objective of the Active Smarter Kids (ASK) study is to investigate the effect of daily physical activity on children's academic performance. Because of the complexity of the relation between physical activity and academic performance it is important to identify mediating and moderating variables such as cognitive function, fitness, adiposity, motor skills and quality of life (QoL). Further, there are global concerns regarding the high prevalence of lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The best means to address this challenge could be through primary prevention. Physical activity is known to play a key role in preventing a host of NCDs. Therefore, we investigated as a secondary objective the effect of the intervention on risk factors related to NCDs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the ASK study, the ASK intervention as well as the scope and details of the methods we adopted to evaluate the effect of the ASK intervention on 5 (th) grade children.
The ASK study is a cluster randomized controlled trial that includes 1145 fifth graders (aged 10 years) from 57 schools (28 intervention schools; 29 control schools) in Sogn and Fjordane County, Norway. This represents 95.3 % of total possible recruitment. Children in all 57 participating schools took part in a curriculum-prescribed physical activity intervention (90 min/week of physical education (PE) and 45 min/week physical activity, in total; 135 min/week). In addition, children from intervention schools also participated in the ASK intervention model (165 min/week), i.e. a total of 300 min/week of physical activity/PE. The ASK study was implemented over 7 months, from November 2014 to June 2015. We assessed academic performance in reading, numeracy and English using Norwegian National tests delivered by The Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training. We assessed physical activity objectively at baseline, midpoint and at the end of the intervention. All other variables were measured at baseline and post-intervention. In addition, we used qualitative methodologies to obtain an in-depth understanding of children's embodied experiences and pedagogical processes taking place during the intervention.
If successful, ASK could provide strong evidence of a relation between physical activity and academic performance that could potentially inform the process of learning in elementary schools. Schools might also be identified as effective settings for large scale public health initiatives for the prevention of NCDs.
Clinicaltrials.gov ID nr: NCT02132494 . Date of registration, 6(th) of May, 2014.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26215478 View in PubMed
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ADCS Prevention Instrument Project: pilot testing of a book club as a psychosocial intervention and recruitment and retention strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79594
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S203-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Whitehouse Peter J
Rajcan Julia L
Sami Susie A
Patterson Marian B
Smyth Kathleen A
Edland Steven D
George Daniel R
Author Affiliation
University Memory and Aging Center, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44120-1013, USA. peter.whitehouse@case.edu
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S203-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Bibliotherapy
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Patient Selection
Pilot Projects
Primary Prevention
Reading
Social Environment
United States
Abstract
Both psychosocial and biologic interventions may delay or prevent Alzheimer disease. Staying mentally active may help older people maintain their cognitive abilities. In the Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study Prevention Instrument Project a book club was introduced as a recruitment and retention device. A 3-arm study was designed and included: a nonrandomized, self-selected group (n=211) who chose not to participate in the book club, and 2 groups randomly assigned to receive 2 books per year in individual self-improvement (n=210) or community involvement (n=207) categories. Participants reported their reactions to the selections and other reading behaviors. Results from the first 2 years revealed that most book club participants agreed with Likert-type statements indicating the readings were enjoyable (P
PubMed ID
17135813 View in PubMed
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885 records – page 1 of 89.